SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Analysis: Monkey In The Middle Of Selfie Copyright Dispute

The recent case of a monkey selfie that went viral on the web raised thorny issues of ownership between a (human) photographer and Wikimedia. Two attorneys from Morrison & Foerster sort out the relevant copyright law.


Latest Comments
  • are you aware that within the photographic industr... »
  • A VPN is a virtual private network, which generall... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    USTR Froman: ‘We Have Had Over 1,200 Meetings With Congress On TPP’

    Published on 3 April 2014 @ 4:40 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    The United States Trade Representative’s office has held over 1,200 meetings with the US Congress about the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement, USTR Michael Froman told a congressional committee hearing on the US trade agenda today. This appears to counter criticism that the TPP talks have lacked transparency and non-industry input.

    Froman told the House Ways and Means Committee hearing that the 12 Pacific-bordering nations in the TPP talks are trying to finish the deal this year.

    But some in Congress, such as the top Democrat on the committee, have concerns, among them IPR-related issues.

    “In 2014, we will work to conclude negotiations on the TPP agreement,” Froman said in his oral testimony, adding that TPP is being negotiated among 12 countries in the fastest growing region in the world representing nearly 40 percent of global GDP and a third of global trade.

    “We are working to ensure that the final agreement will provide comprehensive market opening for goods and services; strong and enforceable labor and environmental standards; innovative commitments on intellectual property rights; groundbreaking new rules designed to ensure fair competition between State-owned enterprises and private companies; and for the first time, obligations that will address the issues of the digital economy,” he said. “We are also working to complete parallel negotiations with Japan to address longstanding issues related to autos, insurance, and other non-tariff measures.”

    On the trade agenda, Froman also said they hope make “significant progress” this year on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership the US is negotiating with the European Union.

    “And building on last year’s successful launch, we expect to make significant progress this year toward a T-TIP agreement with the European Union,” he said. “This will strengthen the world’s largest trade and investment relationship.”

    Among the top priorities for the US are IP rights, Froman said.

    “The United States is an innovative economy, and the Obama Administration is committed to protecting intellectual property (IP), which is vital to promoting and encouraging innovation and creativity,” he said. “Millions of American jobs rely on IP, and we will continue to use our trade agenda in 2014 to defend the IP rights of our creators and innovators while supporting the freedom of the Internet, encouraging the free flow of information across the digital world, and ensuring access to medicines, particularly by the poor in less developed economies.”

    At the World Trade Organization, Froman said, the US is negotiating on environmental goods, services and information technology.

    “At the WTO, we will capitalize on the success at the 9th Ministerial meeting in Bali last December,” he said. “In March, we notified Congress on our intent to enter into negotiations on an Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) with the world’s largest traders in environmental goods, representing nearly 90 percent of this $1.4 trillion market. We will also move towards conclusion of negotiations on two major sectoral agreements: the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) and the expansion of the WTO Information Technology Agreement (ITA).”

    TPP Transparency

    Froman made a point that Congress has been included in the TPP negotiations.

    “As we pursue this agenda, we will continue to consult with Congress and seek input from a wide range of advisors, stakeholders and the public. We have held over 1,200 meetings with Congress about TPP alone – and that doesn’t include the meetings we’ve had on T-TIP, TPA, AGOA or other trade initiatives,” he said. “Our Congressional partners preview our proposals and give us critical feedback every step of the way.  We also ensure that any Member of Congress can review the negotiating text and has the opportunity to receive detailed briefings by our negotiators.” According to sources, members of Congress may view the text but not take copies, and congressional staff are not cleared to view the text.

    Froman also pointed to a new effort by USTR to create a new public interest advisory committee.

    “We are increasing the diversity of trade policy input we receive through the creation of the Public Interest Trade Advisory Committee (PITAC) to include stakeholders focused on consumer, public health and other public interest issues,” he said. “And, consistent with the statute, the Administration is soliciting qualified candidates to serve on the ITACs, our industry advisory committees, to ensure that they are representative of industry, agriculture, services and labor interests.”

    Levin: “Major Challenges” for TPP

    House Ways and Means Committee ranking member Sander Levin, the committee’s top Democrat, said in his statement at the hearing today that, “The TPP represents both major opportunities and major challenges.”

    “The list of major outstanding issues in TPP is too long to recite or describe here, but includes currency manipulation, environmental protections and labor standards, access to medicines, food safety rules, state-owned enterprises, tobacco controls, cross-border data flows and privacy protections, and investment issues,” Levin said. The hearing was intended to address some of these issues.

    The opportunities, he said, stem from the “dramatic economic growth in Asian Pacific nations.” But the negotiations are at a “critical stage,” he said, and “the outcome of a long list of fundamental issues remains uncertain.”

    “Some of these challenges reflect that this is the most complicated multi-party negotiation in 20 years in terms of the issues involved and the number of countries that individually present negotiating challenges,” said Levin.

    For example, he said, Japan has “the third largest economy in the world with an export-dependent and notoriously closed market.”

    Levin said the US-Korea bilateral agreement was “hard – and remains hard with a number of disturbing implementation issues outstanding, and in some cases growing.  Japan will be harder.”

    He also highlighted other difficulties, such as Vietnam, “a communist country with a long-standing command economy and a very poor record on labor rights and the rule of law.  The Colombia agreement was hard – and remains hard with a deeply troubling record of compliance with the Labor Action Plan.  Vietnam will be harder. ” And, he added, Brunei, Malaysia, and Mexico also present “challenges” with respect to the implementation of the labor commitments.

     

    William New may be reached at wnew@ip-watch.ch.

     

    Comments

    1. godenich says:

      Business may conduct their affairs in private as it sees fit, but when business involves the government, it becomes a public issue. There are no excuses for not disclosing the agreement for debate.

    2. Friday’s Endnotes – 04/04/14 | Copyhype says:

      […] USTR Froman: ‘We Have Had Over 1,200 Meetings With Congress On TPP’ — At a House Ways and Means Committee hearing this week US Trade Representative Froman discussed the Trans-Pacific Partnership, currently being negotiated between a dozen countries. As with all US Free Trade Agreements, the TPP sets standards for IP protection, of which Froman said, “The United States is an innovative economy, and the Obama Administration is committed to protecting intellectual property (IP), which is vital to promoting and encouraging innovation and creativity… Millions of American jobs rely on IP, and we will continue to use our trade agenda in 2014 to defend the IP rights of our creators and innovators while supporting the freedom of the Internet, encouraging the free flow of information across the digital world, and ensuring access to medicines, particularly by the poor in less developed economies.” […]


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.225.24.227