SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »
  • If this goes ahead, as the EU will "speak" for all... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    GI Proponents Assess Progress, Challenges; French Minister Blasts Large-Scale Agriculture

    Published on 24 May 2013 @ 10:36 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    International fair, GI, AOBordeaux, France – In a stronghold of French gastronomy and famous regional products, an industry organisation lobbying for the protection of geographical indications chose this week to convene its general assembly and set the goals for future actions.

    For its tenth anniversary, the Organization for an International Geographical Indications Network (oriGIn) met on 20 May for its general assembly in Aquitaine, a southwest region of France, which is said to hold the world highest concentration of geographical indications (GIs) and appellations of origin (AOs).

    OriGIn held its general assembly at the Bordeaux Agricultural Fair presenting many GIs. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    OriGIn held its general assembly at the Bordeaux Agricultural Fair presenting many GIs. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    GI names of products indicate that those products have a specific geographical origin from which they derive particular qualities, reputation or characteristics. In Europe, those products can benefit from two main types of protection: as GIs (protected geographical indications – PGIs) or AOs (protected designations of origin – PDOs). AOs follow stricter rules than GIs, in particular that products must be produced, processed and prepared in a specific geographical area.

    OriGIn’s general assembly proceeded to re-elect outgoing President Ramón González Figueroa, director general of the Consejo Regulador del Tequila. He was first elected in November 2010.

    The general assembly also delivered the “Bordeaux declaration” [pdf] outlining the orientation and priorities for oriGIn over the next two years.

    Lack of Protection of GI Internet Domains

    The group voiced particular concerns about what it called the abusive use of GIs over the internet, and blamed the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the internet technical oversight body. Massimo Vittori, managing director of oriGIn, cast doubts on the international dimension of ICANN, presenting it as a private-run US-based organisation. The fact that it has not replied to oriGIn requests shows a lack of accountability, he said.

    One of the issues is that the ICANN system of assignation does not consider GIs as prior rights. For example, he said, if somebody registered coca-cola.com this could be challenged by the company through trademark law. However, it would not be the case for GIs, in contravention of the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), which recognises GIs as IP rights.

    Many GIs and AOs are supported by associations which organise promotional events. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    Many GIs and AOs are supported by associations which organise promotional events. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    He also cited ICANN’s initiative to greatly expand the number of domains on the internet. “After the dot” lies another issue, he said, as private companies could acquire the right to manage a domain such as .wine, for example, giving private actors the right to use the domain. This could further affect double-level names like for example – if it existed – bordeaux.wine. Who would then check if this domain really relates to the geographical indications, he asked.

    Hopes For Progress on GIs at WTO, WIPO

    The Bordeaux declaration calls for WTO member states to “make clear and significant progress toward the effective multilateral protection of GIs at the next Ministerial Conference.” Vittori said that there was a “certain fatigue after 10 years” of inconclusive discussions at the WTO, but the newly elected Director General Brazilian Amb. Roberto Carvalho de Azevêdo, who should take over in September (IPW, IP-Watch Briefs, 14 May 2013), and the upcoming ministerial conference in Bali, Indonesia, in December, might give a new impulse to the debate. Brazil, Vittori said, is favourable to GIs, with two or three registrations each month.

    OriGIn members hailed the progress achieved by the World Intellectual Property Organization Working Group on the Development of the Lisbon System. WIPO member states are seeking to revise the Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and their International Registration.

    The main goal of the exercise is to widen the membership of the Lisbon agreement, which currently comprises 28 members. In particular, the working group is seeking to include GIs in the instruments which up to now only covered AOs, and give both the same level of protection. At the last meeting, the group decided to recommend to the Lisbon Union in September that a high-level negotiating meeting be convened in 2015 to approve the amendments (IPW, WIPO, 2 May 2013).

    OriGIn members were invited to taste an array of French GI and AO cheeses. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    OriGIn members were invited to taste an array of French GI and AO cheeses. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    EU Progress in 2012, More in 2013

    In March 2012, the European Commission published a new regulation dubbed the “Milk Package,” establishing that under certain conditions, the supply of cheese registered as GIs or AOs could be regulated through the control of volumes, to safeguard value-added and quality of those products, which was approved by oriGIn.

    The year 2013 is of key importance at the EU level, said Vittori, in particular to the reform of the EU Common Agriculture Policy, expected to be put in place in January 2014.

    Also of interest is the reform of the EU Community Trademark. According to Vittori, in spite of a clearly defined regulation making a prior GI or AO absolute grounds for refusal of a trademark registration, in practice it is sometimes not the case (Article 7 of EU Council regulation 207/2009/EC of February 2009 – Current Community Trademark rules). The reform proposes to clarify the issue (IPW, European Policy, 28 March 2013).

    In the Bordeaux declaration, oriGIn also calls for a “sound community legal framework providing non agricultural GIs with an effective protection against misappropriation and counterfeiting.” Vittori said that oriGIn had participated in an EU study on the topic.

    French Agricultural Minister Advocates GIs

    French Agriculture Minister Stéphane Le Foll spoke at the event and promoted a strong link between agriculture and territory and came out against agricultural trademarks and profit-based agriculture.

    The question, he said, is whether the only way to valorise agriculture and differentiate products is linked to a sole commercial goal of companies that invest in agriculture. Can production processes and the choice of a few elements of production define a product and a trademark, he asked, alluding to a “famous soda,” which has a particular process and uses a certain number of ingredients.

    French Minister Stéphane Le Foll a strong supporter of GIs and AOs. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    French Minister Stéphane Le Foll a strong supporter of GIs and AOs. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    The alternative way, he said, is an agriculture which represents history and traditions, a link between products and a territory, a “terroir” (soil considered to have particular agricultural aptitudes and offering specific characteristics to products grown on it), which is a qualitative element of the finished product.

    He warned against profit-focussed agriculture winning over. Even in Europe, he said, some member states have difficulty seeing that agriculture must have a link with the territory.

    It is a worldwide fight against the proponents of a commercially-focused agriculture and trademarks, he said. In Africa, in Latin and Central America, it is a political and conceptual challenge.

    It is now known, Le Foll said, that in order to tackle the issue of food security, “we will need all of the agricultures of the world,” he said. “Those who imagined that the issue of food security would be solved” by specialising areas and by planning for transferable agricultural areas, betting on maximum productivity, are wrong, Le Foll said, adding that the last 30 years have shown that these systems are not working.

    The current bilateral negotiations between the EU and the United States bring into question the protection of GIs, he said. If a bilateral agreement were to limit the possibility of differentiation of products, “it would be a terrible renunciation,” he concluded.

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.196.23.239