SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Analysis: Monkey In The Middle Of Selfie Copyright Dispute

The recent case of a monkey selfie that went viral on the web raised thorny issues of ownership between a (human) photographer and Wikimedia. Two attorneys from Morrison & Foerster sort out the relevant copyright law.


Latest Comments
  • are you aware that within the photographic industr... »
  • A VPN is a virtual private network, which generall... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    WIPO Demonstrates 3D Printing: Making The Impossible Possible

    Published on 25 April 2013 @ 11:44 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    3-D printingExperts in the field of three dimensional (3D) printing, invited by the World Intellectual Property Organization, today tried to demystify this technology, which has been much talked about but still not very well understood. Seen by some as a futuristic technology, 3D printing can achieve amazing results but also has technical limits and is not expected to yet lead to a manufacturing revolution.

    The hallway of the WIPO new building hosted a uncommon display of surprising objects on 25 April, a foldable seat made of plastic that once folded vaguely resembles an umbrella, a pair of improbable antique lace high heels plastic shoes, and a collection of equally strange items, all of which were made with 3D printing technology. A “3D printer” was also busy manufacturing a set of plastic objects.

    Human white matter fibers, first accurate model of the wiring of the human brain. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    Human white matter fibers, first accurate model of the wiring of the human brain. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    But 3D printing is not as frivolous as it seems, as many applications can be found in areas such as biology, medical treatments, and the serious-minded Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) will launch 3D print operations in July 2013 to help researchers with prototypes and models for use in the school’s 80 research laboratories.

    WIPO Director General Francis Gurry, chairing the panel discussion organised by WIPO, said 3D printing has potentially enormous implications for manufacturing capacities throughout the world. One of the reasons for the patent system is that technologies are disclosed, Gurry said. In the case of 3D printing, the first patent filing was in 1971and the first patent was granted in 1977, so the technology is now in the public domain, he said.

    For Carla van Steenbergen, legal counsel at Materialise, a company specialised in 3D printing, the correct terminology to describe this technology is “additive manufacturing,” as it only is loosely related to printing. It really is not as simple as pressing the button of a printer, all panellists said. It gives the possibility to manufacture a piece of hardware from digital information, from a computer file containing a design, van Steenbergen explained. The object is then done layer by layer.

    Olivier Olmo, director of operations at EPFL, said several different technologies are available on the market and some are easily found on the internet where people can buy or build their machine. But there was a core difference between professional machines and machines that can be accessed or built by the public in terms of quality and possibilities.

    3D printing in action. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    3D printing in action. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    The main differences between professional machines and the ones accessible by the public is the complexity of the pre-processing of the data that could prove very complicated and not easy to use, he said. The possibilities offered by machines found on the internet are limited to small objects, such as glasses or handles. At EPFL, he said, this technology offers new opportunities to all the laboratories for research purposes and design of prototypes, although there is a limit to the technology.

    Gurry asked what brought the “media hype” around this technology. Van Steenbergen said additive manufacturing applies to many areas, such as in the medical field, like custom implants for hip replacement surgeries. The surgeon will be able to manufacture a custom-made implant from the magnetic resonance imaging of their patients, taking their age into account, van Steenbergen said.

    “It makes the impossible become possible,” she said. Some uniqueness and complexities can only be addressed through additive manufacturing, she added. Simon Jones, partner in DLA Piper’s Intellectual Property & Technological Group, concurred and said the technology has many applications such as human bones, clothing, pharmaceutical products, and pieces of furniture.

    One of the benefits of the technology, is that products can be manufactured anywhere, without the need to move them halfway around the world, he said. It also allows small scale production, he said, with societal and ecological benefits, he added.

    First 3D-printed "Couture" shoes by Naim Josefi made in polyamide by Materialise. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    First 3D-printed “Couture” shoes by Naim Josefi made in polyamide by Materialise. (Photo Credit: Catherine Saez, IP-Watch)

    Several speakers said problems could occur concerning the quality control of the products and as the technology is more widely spread there would be a need for regulatory standards and measures, in all areas, and in particular in the medical sector. Intellectual property might also become an issue as the technology spreads and illegal copying might be hard to avoid, Jones said.

    Erik Ziegler, one of the co-founders of Prevue+Medical, a start-up specialised in 3D printing in medical applications, said that currently the US Food and Drug Administration does not have any regulation on products issued from 3D printing.

    Additive manufacturing has huge possibilities and is game changing, van Steenberger said, as “we are doing things that we could not have done 20 or 30 years ago.” But even if 3D printing can appear as a miracle technology, van Steenbergen said classical manufacturing appears to be here to stay, as 3D printing at this stage cannot represent an alternative.

    Some limitations stem from the fact that some materials cannot be used with this technology, said Olmo. Some 10 or 20 years down the road, 3D printing might be a revolution in terms of technology available for everybody. Then IP protection and regulation will be necessary, he said.

    According to Van Steenberger, Materialise is “flooded” by demands from people wanting to apply 3D printing to their products, but, she said, the applications and use of the technology have to be for the right purposes.

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     

    Comments

    1. WIPO Demonstrates 3D Printing; Making The Impossible Possible – Intellectual Property Watch | 3D Printer Updates says:

      [...] WIPO Demonstrates 3D Printing; Making The Impossible PossibleIntellectual Property WatchExperts in the field of three dimensional (3D) printing, invited by the World Intellectual Property Organization, today tried to demystify this technology, which has been much talked about but still not very well understood. Seen by some as a … [...]

    2. 3D Printers » Blog Archive » WIPO Demonstrates 3D Printing; Making The Impossible Possible - Intellectual Property Watch says:

      [...] WIPO Demonstrates 3D Printing; Making The Impossible PossibleIntellectual Property WatchExperts in the field of three dimensional (3D) printing, invited by the World Intellectual Property Organization, today tried to demystify this technology, which has been much talked about but still not very well understood. Seen by some as a … [...]


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.196.204.15