SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »
  • 'Business methods were generally not patentable in... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    IP Professionals Discuss Tech Transfer Potential In Humanitarian Business At WIPO

    Published on 23 January 2013 @ 7:47 pm

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    A global business association held a meeting at the World Intellectual Property Organization this week on IP market developments, including increasing opportunities in technology transfer for commercial purposes. The intimate gathering featured a line-up of high-level speakers, including WIPO Director General Francis Gurry.

    The Licensing Executives Society International (LESI), a US-based association of IP business professionals, held its second Global Technology Impact Forum (GTIF) from 20-22 January. Hosted at WIPO, the event was attended by about 50 participants representing government, industry, research, and private foundations.

    The full agenda is here. Under the theme, “Business and NGO Collaboration for IP Driven Economic Development,” panel session topics included IP driven economic development, commercial IP development, and humanitarian technology transfer.

    Highlighting the private nature of the event, non-governmental organisation Knowledge Ecology International (KEI), pointed out that the international event was not featured on the WIPO events calendar.

    However, James Malackowski, immediate past president of LESI, told Intellectual Property Watch that “everyone is welcome, the more the better” and attributed the low level of public outreach to the fact that the second forum was “more of a working session than the first one.”

    WIPO Looking for PPPs

    During the first day, WIPO Director General Francis Gurry gave an intervention during a panel on “Intellectual Property and Innovation Policy,” highlighting the organisation’s achievements in its aim to improve the global IP system. Examples included the recently signed Beijing Treaty for the protection of audiovisual performances; the anticipated treaty to improve access of public works for visually impaired people; and progress toward agreement on broadcasting and designs.

    In the context of “global economic behaviour” and “global uses of technology” in a world of national IP regulations, Gurry underlined the importance of international legal framework to “ensure an even playing field and try to prevent recourse to technology protectionism.”

    Additionally, Gurry discussed the growing importance of cross-sector collaboration with the growing importance of public-private partnerships and foundations in the international sphere.

    Noting that WIPO would be “looking increasingly for public private partnerships”, he announced that the private sector would be involved in the organisation’s annual general assembly for the first time this year with “at least a half-day devoted to listening to the enterprise sector”.

    Also during the first day, WIPO’s Chief Economist Carsten Fink presented [PPT] the organisation’s latest statistics published in the report, “World Intellectual Property Indicators 2012”. A key finding presented was the growing number of IP filings in 2011 despite the sluggish global economy (IPW, WIPO, 12 December 2012).

    “No one knows better what is needed in an LDC community than an inventor who lives there.” – Thaddeus Burns, senior counsel of IP and Technology Policy at GE

    Targeting the “Bottom of the Pyramid”

    A reflection of new business opportunities in the realm of humanitarian endeavours, the theme of the second day “Invent for Humanity” including a panel on how IP fits into technological progress and sustainable growth.

    Commenting on the humanitarian focus, Malackowski, past president of LESI, told Intellectual Property Watch, “It will be a growing area of technology transfer in the next three to five years, including transfer for commercial purposes.”

    “The bottom of the pyramid, as they call it, is a very large market that people are just beginning to understand how to serve with a profit motive,” Malackowski said.

    In an effort to facilitate technology transfer for businesses of all sizes, LESI is seeking to create a virtual toolbox comprised material needed to facilitate transfers, such as standard contracts and lists of best practices.

    GTIF participants had the opportunity to edit a LESI resolution on IP Business Principles [Word], which was developed based on input from the association’s board and last year’s World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on IP. http://www.weforum.org/content/global-agenda-council-intellectual-property-system-2012

    The list of ten principles is part of a 2030 vision of IP and how practices should be shaped to fit the needs of the future economy and the fair protection of innovation to serve humanity. LESI leaders plan to revise the draft based on GTIF participant feedback present a finalised version this year for their members’ use as well as other organisations.

    The role of IP in humanitarian endeavours varying in scope and size was explored through a few case studies during a second day panel, which was chaired by Jennifer Brant, director of Innovation Insights, an initiative bringing technology provider perspective to the Geneva community.

    Jon de Bufanos, managing director of Natural Innovations, the company behind the Wonderbag, an insulated sac that works like a slow cooker to save on energy and cooking time, discussed his experience managing the company’s IP as it grows internationally. According to the website, the company sold some 500,000 products as of June 2012 and has plans to expand sales in 15 other countries by 2015.

    He said that one of his key leanings was that “protecting IP is expensive,” asking participants, “How does a small organisation with global intentions and global goals go about protecting IP in a cost-effective way?”

    “Policy Paradox”

    Thaddeus Burns, senior counsel for IP and technology policy at General Electric, shared results from the GE Global Innovation Barometer 2013. The international study surveyed over 3,000 business executives on the drivers and barriers to innovation, including IP policies.

    In what Burns called a “policy paradox”, business executives were divided between globalisation and protectionism. According to the study, “71 percent of executives preferred their government prioritize domestic innovation promotion, while 71 percent also wanted their governments to further open markets.”

    Burns commented that one of the main reasons deterring companies from collaborating with other companies is a lack of IP protection in partner countries. However, he insisted that partnership is the best way for companies to grow.

    “No one knows better what is needed in an LDC [least developed country] community than an inventor who lives there,” Burns said.

    Richard Wilder, associate general counsel at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation presented the foundation’s various public health funding options, which includes grants, contracts, and program-related investments (PRIs). The philanthropic giant works with a wide variety of actors from public, private, academic, and NGO sectors.

    On the private foundation’s IP policy, Wilder said, “Our primary goal is to construct and manage foundation-funded projects and the resulting products, services, processes, technology, materials, software, data, and other innovations in a manner that ensures global access.”

    Additionally, Berhane Gebru, director of programmes at FHI 360-Satellife, a US-based non-profit organisation specialising in health information and technology solutions in developing countries, discussed several examples of how the organisation is improving systems across the globe.

    He commented on the “complexity of relations between diverse actors” and “the culture gap” that he faces regularly between private, public and voluntary sectors. “Reaching consensus becomes a necessary evil,” Gebru said.

    2013 Awards

    Two LESI/GTIF award recipients were announced 21 January during the reception and dinner, which was held at the Mandarin Hotel, one of Geneva’s top five star hotels. The USPTO was awarded “The National IP and Technology Transfer Policy” award for its Patents for Humanity programme; and Solar Sister, a social enterprise seeking to eradicate energy poverty through the empowerment of women, was recognized with an award for “Outstanding Humanitarian Technology Transfer Initiative.”

    [Pullquote] “No one knows better what is needed in an LDC community than an inventor who lives there,” said Thaddeus Burns, senior counsel for IP and technology policy at GE

    Rachel Marusak Hermann may be reached at info@ip-watch.org.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 107.20.121.254