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1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Ten Questions About Internet Governance

On April 23 in Sao Paulo, Brazil, the “Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance,” also known as “NETmundial” in an allusion to the global football event that will occur later in that country, will be convened. Juan Alfonso Fernández González of the Cuban Communications Ministry and a veteran of the UN internet governance meetings, raises 10 questions that need to be answered at NETmundial.


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    South Korea Bolsters Copyright Strategy In K-Pop Crazy States

    Published on 14 December 2012 @ 1:20 pm

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    Manila, Philippines – With the global success of the dance single Gangnam Style, the heyday of the Korean popular music or K-Pop, along with the country’s other creative content, is proving to be far from over. And it’s providing a good reason for the Republic of Korea to bolster its copyright protection strategy, particularly in countries where its creative content exports are most popular and where copyright infringement is inevitable.

    Kyong-Soo Choe, director general of the Korea Copyright Commission (KCC), said in an interview with Intellectual Property Watch that the Korean government has made substantial investments to protect domestic and foreign copyrights. Part of the mandate of the KCC, an agency under the Korean Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, is to make South Korea a “global copyright leader.”

    Kyong-Soo was in the Philippine capital Manila last week for the Korea-Philippines Copyright Forum, held on 7 December, which was staged to raise copyright awareness in the country where various forms of Korean entertainment such as K-Pop, Korean soap operas or “Koreanovelas” and Korean online games are a hit.

    The popularity of Korean entertainment in the Philippines is just part of the worldwide phenomenon of an unprecedented spread and massive consumption of Korean entertainment called as the “Hallyu Wave” or the “Korean Wave” which rakes in billions of dollars in yearly revenues for the country.

    In the Philippines, for instance, local television companies regularly buy licenses from Korean broadcasters for them to be able to air dubbed versions of Koreanovelas. Local online game publishers also source most of their games from Korean game publishers.

    However, not all Korean creative content that is available in the local market is legitimate. Pirated copies of Korean drama shows, music and games are also easily accessible to the public both offline and online. In general, “there is a very low level of IP consciousness and very low level of IP appreciation among Filipinos,” Mark Herrin of the IP Office of the Philippines told the forum. The Philippines is moving to amend its copyright law to address this nagging piracy problem.

    On 11 December, the Philippine Senate ratified the bicameral conference committee report on the copyright bill amendments, with the target of the Philippine President signing this into law before the end of the year.

    KCC has an office in Manila, launched in May this year. The Manila office is the fourth satellite office of KCC after it opened offices in Beijing and Shanghai in China and in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Soon, another KCC office will open in Vietnam and an office in the United States is in the pipeline as well, Kyong-Soo said.

    “What is most important is to establish good relations between the two countries and to have a better environment for the right holders,” Kyong-Soo said, when asked about the strategy of the state agency in countries where the rate of copyright piracy is high.

    The Philippines and Vietnam are on the 2012 watchlist of the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR), while China and Thailand are on its priority watchlist. The USTR’s Special 301 Report [pdf] unilaterally examines intellectual property rights protection and enforcement in US trading partners and subsequently lists and classifies either as on the watchlist or priority watchlist countries it deems to not offer adequate protection for US IP rights owners.

    With the office in Beijing opened in 2006, KCC’s first office abroad, Kyong-Soo said it is still too early and also difficult to enumerate “tangible results” of its efforts in countries where it has satellite offices. Among other things, the KCC office provides expert advice for rightsholders, the industry and the government; promotes copyright awareness; and engages in copyright information and exchange with local counterparts.

    In addition, as part of KCC’s mandate to hold international cooperation and exchanges in the area of copyright, the agency organises every year bilateral fora between Korea and China, Korea and Japan and multilateral fora and seminars in the Southeast Asian region to exchange information on latest trends in copyright protection.

    Copyright-based industry is an important contributor to South Korea’s economic growth. According to a WIPO-commissioned study [pdf], in 2009 alone, the nominal value of copyright-based industry of South Korea was at 105.4 trillion Korean won (KRW) or about US $97.33 trillion at today’s exchange rate, accounting for 9.89 percent of the country’s GDP.

    At the forum, Do-goo Lee of SBS Content Hub presented the three new modes of copyright infringement, namely torrent; smart phone copyright infringement coming in the forms of free streaming and illegal podcast on iTunes; and unauthentic IPTV business through domestic cable delivery. SBS is South Korea’s giant commercial broadcaster which supplies to broadcasters around the world its hit Koreanovelas.

    Also, South Korean speakers shared at the forum the importance of copyright protection, the roles of the government in IP rights protection, such as making sure to provide governing rules for fair competition, to make appropriate laws and regulations, to implement enforcement measures and to participate in international norm-setting processes.

    Maricel Estavillo may be reached at maricelestavillo@gmail.com.

     

    Comments

    1. PSY et le prix de la neutralisation symbolique du remix | :: S.I.Lex :: says:

      [...] Le Pays du Matin Calme est en effet une contrée qui ne plaisante pas avec le droit d’auteur (c’est le premier pays par exemple à avoir mis en place une riposte graduée à l’imitation de la France). La K-pop fait d’ailleurs partie intégrante du phénomène de l’Hallyu ou « vague coréenne » qui voit depuis plusieurs années la Corée diffuser massivement ses productions culturelles dans les pays asiatiques environnants et dans le monde entier. PSY est d’ailleurs devenu le fer de lance de cette stratégie commerciale, qui passe également par une sensibilité accrue à la lutte contre la contrefaçon en Corée, soumis au piratage massif d’autres pays comme les Philippines par exemple. [...]

    2. PSY et le prix de la neutralisation symbolique du remix · Omnimata says:

      [...] Le Pays du Matin Calme est en effet une contrée qui ne plaisante pas avec le droit d’auteur (c’est le premier pays par exemple à avoir mis en place une riposte graduée à l’imitation de la France). La K-pop fait d’ailleurs partie intégrante du phénomène de l’Hallyu ou « vague coréenne » qui voit depuis plusieurs années la Corée diffuser massivement ses productions culturelles dans les pays asiatiques environnants et dans le monde entier. PSY est d’ailleurs devenu le fer de lance de cette stratégie commerciale, qui passe également par une sensibilité accrue à la lutte contre la contrefaçon en Corée, soumis au piratage massif d’autres pays comme les Philippines par exemple. [...]


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
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