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Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


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    WCIT Split After Split “Vote” On Internet Governance Resolution

    Published on 13 December 2012 @ 3:06 pm

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    Dubai, UAE – A mere resolution, not part of the future International Telecommunication Regulations (ITR), led to yet another escalation at the ongoing World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) in Dubai last night.

    [Update:] The ongoing WCIT negotiations for new ITRs came to a halt after a controversial vote on the nondiscriminatory access of countries to networks. A conclusive vote ended the debate and also the possibility of many ITU member states agreeing on the future ITR. Only 89 of 144 eligible delegations signed, while 55 reserved their right to do as they choose, which for the large blocs, like the US, EU and Japan, but also Kenya, Costa Rica and Colombia, means they can stick to the old ITR. [end]

    The link to the new ITR is here [pdf]. The list of signatories is here. [end update]

    The already tense discussions escalated when the WCIT Chair Mohamed Al Ghanim, after asking for a “sense of the room” by a show of the name plates, declared the resolution adopted by the majority of delegates.

    Late night vote at WCIT; Photo credit: Monika Ermert

    New Zealand, Sweden and Spain issued reservations about that “coup.” The UN International Telecommunication Union (ITU), which is organising the meeting, normally only decides by consensus and not by voting or by majorities, and the ITU secretary general had said the organisation would stick to that rule.

    The United States and European countries spoke against the resolution just before, with US Ambassador Terry Kramer, head of the large US delegation, saying that in any event the US had “not come to this conference in anticipation of a discussion on the internet.” The US and European countries yesterday drew their red lines with regard to the scope. For that camp, the slightest implication for the internet is the trigger to ultimately not sign the potential future ITR.

    The future ITRs, intended to be an update of the existing ITRs, are still far from being delivered. The conference had been expected to produce text ready for signature by tomorrow, Friday.

    But as of Thursday afternoon, there was still no compromise on the hard issues, especially a definition of who would be addressed by the treaty and the potential addition of a general provision on “network security and robustness” and “unsolicited bulk electronic communication.”

    Somehow a “miracle” is needed to save the conference, Franc Dolenc of the Slovenian Regulatory Authority said.

    The draft ITRs as of 13 December are available here.

    The US-based Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) issued a press release in alarm after the late night vote.

    “Last night at 1:30am in the morning the fears of many citizens, businesses, NGOs and public agencies were realized as the chairman of the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) called for an unexpected vote to have a UN agency, where only governments have a real voice, take on a more active role in governing the Internet,” CCIA said in its release.

    “Under no circumstances should the stewards of the Internet be forced to hand over the keys to Internet governance mechanisms to a body where the short-sighted political considerations of morally questionable regimes hold more weight than concerns of the very engineers and programmers who have built and maintained the Internet since its birth,” CCIA President & CEO Ed Black said in the release. “The controversial circumstances that gave rise to yesterday’s Internet power grab should be illuminating.”

    Monika Ermert may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     

    Comments

    1. Domain Industry » Preditable WCIT Outcome Sees US Lead Objections To ITU’s Internet Governance Changes says:

      [...] WCIT Split After Split “Vote” On Internet Governance Resolutionwww.ip-watch.org/2012/12/13/wcit-split-after-split-vote-on-internet-governance-resolution/ [...]


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    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
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