Film Industry Praises Obama’s “Understanding” Of IP’s Importance

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The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) last night quickly congratulated US President Barack Obama on his re-election for four more years, praising his “understanding” of the importance of intellectual property to the US economy. Observers have seen the Obama administration as strongly supportive of the copyright industry, and said Obama received significant campaign financial support from Hollywood while possibly losing ground with the technology industry. And some even see the possibility of a reverse in the US Congress of a trend toward stronger copyright protection.

“I congratulate Barack Obama on his victory tonight. President Obama has demonstrated a great understanding of the importance of intellectual property to the fundamental strength of the American economy,” MPAA Chairman and CEO Chris Dodd said in a statement issued shortly after the election results were decided.

MPAA had praised the work of both candidates in the election, also Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

“In an era of partisan discord, there is bipartisan agreement that protecting American creativity and innovation is critical to our competitive edge in the global marketplace,” Dodd said. “I look forward to continuing to work closely with the Obama Administration to ensure the creative industries have every opportunity to thrive.”

For a short analysis of Obama’s support from Hollywood versus the technology industry, see here.

Meanwhile, the US nonprofit Public Knowledge published an analysis of the election outcome that found the possibility that members of Congress might be more amenable to a reverse in the direction of evermore copyright protection, following the resounding defeats of the so-called SOPA and PIPA bills early this year.

“People are still trying to figure out the long-term effects of 14 million voices united against SOPA and PIPA,” said PK President Gigi Sohn, “but for certain two of the short term effects are 1) there is unlikely to be a bill that strengthens copyright enforcement that moves through either house of Congress without a thorough debate; and 2) there are now more members and Senators looking at the possibility of rolling back some of the relentless march towards stronger and longer copyrights. What makes reform a strong possibility is that it has support from both sides of the aisle.”

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