SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    L’éditeur d’un logiciel open source accuse IBM de concurrence déloyale – IBM demande une analyse

    Published on 26 April 2010 @ 11:03 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    IBM fait l’objet d’une plainte pour concurrence déloyale portée devant la Commission européenne par l’éditeur d’un logiciel open source, qui accuse le géant de l’informatique d’empêcher les consommateurs d’utiliser ce logiciel. Au même moment, la communauté open source craint que le fait qu’IBM, développeur de logiciels open source de premier plan, revendique ses droits de propriété intellectuelle pour barrer la route à un concurrent ne représente une menace pour les logiciels libres et open source, et ne conduise à anéantir les revendications de propriété intellectuelle émises par d’autres acteurs. IBM, pour sa part, réaffirme son soutien à la communauté open source et demande à l’entreprise concurrente d’expliquer dans quelle mesure le logiciel en question n’enfreint pas ses droits de propriété intellectuelle.

    En 1999, l’équipe du projet open source Hercules a créé l’émulateur du même nom. Cette technologie utilise le jeu d’instructions d’IBM, les traduit et les interprète de manière que les programmes et les applications IBM puissent être utilisés sur des macroordinateurs d’une autre marque, comme un serveur Microsoft construit à partir d’une technologie de traitement Intel », explique Ted Henneberry, avocat américain de TurboHercules SAS, l’entité commerciale basée en France qui tente de commercialiser Hercules et qui a déposé la plainte pour concurrence déloyale.

    TurboHercules a été fondée en 2009 par le créateur d’Hercules, Roger Bowler. Peu après que l’entreprise ait vu le jour, en juillet 2009, Bowler a envoyé un courrier [pdf en anglais] à IBM expliquant que l’entreprise essayait de « créer une offre commerciale qui permette aux utilisateurs de choisir entre différentes plateformes compatibles, tout en contribuant à la pérennité de l’environnement pour macroordinateurs d’IBM ». TurboHercules proposait de mettre à la disposition des utilisateurs de macroordinateurs IBM une licence permettant d’utiliser les systèmes d’exploitation IBM sur la plateforme TurboHercules, tout en laissant IBM fixer le prix d’une telle licence « dans un cadre raisonnable et équitable ».

    Un macroordinateur (ou mainframe) est un système doté d’une architecture particulièrement adaptée pour gérer le traitement de grandes quantités de données. Il peut être utilisé pour gérer des transactions effectuées par carte bancaire ou des systèmes de réservation de compagnies aériennes.

    Au mois de novembre, IBM a décliné l’offre en rappelant que l’imitation d’un système exclusif IMB nécessitait l’obtention des droits de propriété intellectuelle de l’entreprise. « Vous comprendrez que l’on ne peut raisonnablement pas demander à IBM d’envisager d’accorder des licences pour l’utilisation de systèmes d’exploitation sur des plateformes contrefaites », a invoqué IBM dans un courrier daté du 4 novembre [pdf en anglais] publié sur le site Internet de TurboHercules.

    Dans sa réponse à IBM datée du 18 novembre [pdf en anglais], TurboHercules a manifesté sa surprise vis-à-vis du fait qu’IBM évoque une violation de ses droits de propriété intellectuelle et fasse preuve de si peu de soutien au mouvement open source, ajoutant qu’une telle attitude était en contradiction avec la position passée du leader mondial et l’engagement pris en 2005 [pdf en anglais] de ne pas revendiquer 500 de ses brevets contre la communauté open source.

    En mars 2010, IBM a finalement répondu [pdf en anglais] en faisant part de « lourds soupçons de violation de technologies brevetées d’IBM », et en rappelant que l’entreprise avait consacré « de nombreuses années et des milliards de dollars à mettre au point » ces technologies, et qu’IBM « est connu pour détenir un grand nombre de droits de propriété intellectuelle dans ce domaine ». Dans ce courrier, IBM dresse une liste de brevets susceptibles d’avoir été violés par Hercules. Selon Bowler, au moins deux de ces brevets sont concernés par l’engagement pris par IBM en 2005.

    « Hercules existe depuis plus de dix ans et n’a jamais fait l’objet d’une réclamation de la part d’IBM pour violation de ses droits de propriété intellectuelle. Il faut également savoir qu’IBM avait consacré un chapitre de l’un de ses Redbooks (guides d’utilisation) à Hercules, avant d’effacer discrètement ce chapitre il y a plusieurs années », a confié Bowler à Intellectual Property Watch.

    Plainte pour concurrence déloyale contre IBM

    Selon un communiqué de presse, TurboHercules a officiellement déposé plainte le 23 mars contre IBM auprès de la direction générale de la concurrence de la Commission européenne, à Bruxelles. Dans sa plainte, TurboHercules accuse IBM de détenir « un monopole absolu sur le marché des systèmes d’exploitation pour macroordinateurs », et d’essayer d’abuser de cette position dominante en privant les consommateurs de la possibilité de faire fonctionner le système d’exploitation IBM sur les macroordinateurs d’autres fabricants, pratiquant ainsi ce que le plaignant qualifie de « vente liée illégale ».

    La direction générale de la Commission va demander à IBM de répondre puis, après avoir analysé la situation au regard d’autres plaintes de même nature, elle décidera si oui ou non ces plaintes justifient d’entamer officiellement une procédure, explique Henneberry.

    D’après TurboHercules, IBM, qui avait autrefois pris le parti de publier des informations pour l’interopérabilité de ses systèmes d’exploitation pour macroordinateurs, aurait récemment ajouté de nouvelles caractéristiques, basées sur des interfaces non documentées, entre les systèmes d’exploitation IBM System z (z/OS) et les macroordinateurs IBM. Ainsi, l’entreprise empêche la communauté open source de « maintenir une compatibilité totale entre Hercules et les systèmes d’exploitation pour macroordinateurs IBM », précise le communiqué.

    Dans sa réclamation pour concurrence déloyale, TurboHercules demande à la Commission européenne de contraindre IBM à mettre sous licence ses systèmes d’exploitation pour macroordinateurs, indépendamment de la plateforme matérielle, et à continuer de publier ses spécifications techniques pour les interfaces et protocoles z/OS, ou à accorder une licence à TurboHercules pour l’utilisation de ces interfaces et protocoles.

    Dans un communiqué de presse daté du 6 avril, Bowler confiait que la décision d’intenter une action contre IBM n’avait pas été prise de gaîté de cœur. « Nous ne cherchons pas à faire payer des amendes à IBM. Nous voulons simplement que l’entreprise accepte de permettre à des consommateurs qui ont acheté en toute légalité des systèmes d’exploitation pour macroordinateurs z/OS d’utiliser ce logiciel sur la plateforme matérielle de leur choix ».

    On ne peut pas comparer Hercules à un « faux sac à main Gucci », explique Bowler. « Il s’agit d’un émulateur tiers, basé sur un logiciel open source, et développé en toute bonne foi à l’aide de la documentation publiée par IBM sur son architecture z ».

    Le mouvement FLOSS menacé ?

    Pour Florian Mueller, développeur de logiciels et initiateur de la campagne NoSoftwarePatents en 2004, les brevets qui, selon IBM, auraient été violés par Hercules pourraient menacer d’autres projets du mouvement FLOSS (mouvement des logiciels libres et open source), comme MySQL, VirtualBox et SQLite.

    Mueller a dressé la liste des brevets qui pourraient menacer d’autres projets open source sur le site Internet de FLOSS. « L’attaque portée par IBM contre Hercules est une attaque contre l’interopérabilité et l’innovation FLOSS en général », dénonce Mueller. Ce dernier appelle à une mesure de réglementation.

    IBM réaffirme son engagement auprès du mouvement open source

    Dans une déclaration envoyée à Intellectual Property Watch, IBM a réaffirmé son engagement auprès de la communauté open source. L’entreprise déclare avoir « depuis plusieurs années investi des milliards de dollars en gage de soutien à cette communauté ».

    « S’il s’avère que TurboHercules est un membre officiel de la communauté open source et répond aux conditions pour bénéficier de l’engagement, alors IBM ne réclamera aucun droit sur les deux brevets revendiqués contre TurboHercules », précise la déclaration. « Cependant, puisque nous ne disposons que de très peu d’éléments sur TurboHercules, c’est à l’entreprise de prouver qu’elle fait partie de la communauté open source ».

    « De plus, nous avons prévenu TurboHercules que son émulateur pourrait bien enfreindre un grand nombre d’autres brevets. L’objet de notre courrier était d’informer TurboHercules de l’existence de nos droits de propriété intellectuelle, afin qu’ils puissent analyser la situation en toute connaissance de cause. Nous attendons avec impatience les résultats de cette analyse ».

    Selon Henneberry, TurboHercules voudrait que la Commission européenne se base sur d’anciennes décisions, comme l’accord passé en 1984 entre la Commission européenne et IBM. IBM avait accepté de se soumettre à une enquête menée par la Commission sur des pratiques identiques à celles concernées par la réclamation de TurboHercules. Suite à cet accord, IBM a dû publier ses protocoles d’interface et d’autres informations techniques permettant à d’autres plateformes matérielles d’être utilisées avec le système d’exploitation IBM. En d’autres termes, IBM n’avait plus le droit d’« enchaîner » son système d’exploitation à sa propre plateforme matérielle.

    IBM avait conservé le droit de se défaire de cet engagement à condition de respecter un préavis, que l’entreprise a donné à la fin des années 90. « À l’époque, la Commission avait affirmé qu’elle continuerait de surveiller le marché », a rappelé Henneberry à Intellectual Property Watch. « Une décision similaire a été rendue par un tribunal américain, mais a été annulée en 2001 ».

    Un débat s’est ouvert au sein de la communauté du libre et de l’open source sur le statut d’entreprise open source de TurboHercules . Des exemples de discussions sur ce sujet sont disponibles ici et ici (en anglais).

    Traduit de l’anglais par Griselda Jung

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.237.90.56