SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Les États-Unis examinent l’utilisation du droit d’auteur comme obstacle aux importations du marché gris

    Published on 13 January 2010 @ 9:17 am

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    Il s’agit d’une utilisation peu conventionnelle de la loi sur le droit d’auteur, mais si Omega SA gagne son procès devant la Cour suprême des États-Unis, le célèbre horloger suisse aura conçu une nouvelle arme puissante contre l’importation de produits du marché gris sur le sol américain.

    Les produits du marché gris sont des produits de marque légitimes qui sont mis sur le marché avec l’autorisation du titulaire de droits, puis sont finalement revendus en dehors des canaux de distribution agréés. En général, un produit destiné à être vendu à un prix relativement faible dans une certaine zone géographique se retrouve vendu dans une autre zone, où les canaux de distributions agréés vendent le même produit de marque à un prix beaucoup plus élevé.

    Les produits du marché gris, qui viennent concurrencer les ventes des produits vendus à des prix plus élevés (avec des marges plus importantes), représentent une aubaine pour les consommateurs et un gros manque à gagner pour de nombreuses entreprises. Selon une enquête réalisée par KPMG et Alliance for Gray Market and Counterfeit Abatement (alliance pour la lutte contre le marché gris et la contrefaçon), en 2007, aux États-Unis, les ventes de produits du marché gris se sont élevées à 58 milliards de dollars US uniquement pour le marché des technologies de l’information, ce qui a représenté pour les entreprises de ce secteur une perte de bénéfices de 10 milliards de dollars.

    Habituellement, les fabricants de produits de marque utilisaient le droit des marques pour lutter contre les importations de produits du marché gris, car les pays traitaient souvent de manière différente les ventes de produits de marque à l’intérieur des frontières et celles réalisées à l’étranger. Au niveau national, dès la première vente autorisée d’un article de marque, les droits du propriétaire de la marque s’épuisaient. Le propriétaire de la marque perdait alors tout contrôle sur la revente de l’article dans le pays. L’acheteur pouvait revendre cet article sur l’ensemble du territoire sans craindre de commettre une infraction vis-à-vis de la marque.

    Cependant, si la première vente autorisée était réalisée à l’étranger, celle-ci n’était pas concernée par le principe de la première vente sur le territoire national et les droits liés à la marque n’étaient donc pas épuisés sur le marché intérieur. Si l’article vendu à l’étranger était revendu et importé sur le territoire national, l’importateur pouvait être accusé de contrefaçon de marque.

    Certains pays continuent de n’appliquer le principe de la première vente qu’à l’intérieur de leurs frontières. En revanche, de nombreux autres pays ont étendu l’application de ce principe au-delà de leurs frontières, de telle façon que l’importation de produits du marché gris dans ces États ne constitue plus une infraction.

    Les États-Unis, par exemple, appliquent le principe de la première vente à toutes les ventes autorisées à l’échelle mondiale. Dès qu’un article de marque est vendu quelque part sur la planète avec le consentement du propriétaire de la marque, celui-ci perd automatiquement tout droit de contrôle sur la revente de cet article. Le détenteur de la marque ne peut donc rien faire contre la revente au marché gris de l’article sur le territoire des États-Unis.

    Néanmoins, le système présente une brèche. Un propriétaire de marque a la possibilité de s’opposer à l’importation d’articles du marché gris si ces derniers sont « matériellement différents » des produits de marque commercialisés aux États-Unis avec son accord. Par conséquent, les fabricants de produits de marque ont usé de divers moyens pour faire ressortir les différences entre les produits destinés au marché américain de ceux destinés à l’étranger. Pour établir cette différence matérielle entre les produits du marché gris et ceux autorisés au États-Unis, certaines entreprises ont pointé du doigt la différence de garantie, d’emballage ou encore de documentation fournie à l’intérieur de l’emballage (écrite en différentes langues). Dans certains cas, ces arguments sont acceptés par les tribunaux américains, mais pas toujours.

    Comme l’a indiqué Ethan Horwitz, juriste spécialiste de la propriété intellectuelle pour le cabinet new-yorkais King & Spalding et auteur du traité en cinq volumes World Trademark Law & Practice, le Japon reconnaît de la même façon l’épuisement des droits sur les marques au niveau international. Un produit du marché gris importé au Japon n’enfreint pas le droit des marques du pays, à condition que la marque de ce produit ait été appliquée avec l’accord de son propriétaire, que le produit provienne bien de ce dernier (ou d’un bénéficiaire de licence agréé) et qu’il ne soit pas qualitativement différent des produits que le propriétaire de la marque a autorisés à la vente au Japon.

    Au sein de l’Union européenne (UE), la situation est un peu plus confuse. Selon Alexander Klett, juriste spécialiste de la propriété intellectuelle au cabinet Reed Smith de Munich, le principe d’épuisement des droits s’applique bien au niveau de l’union. Si un article de marque pénètre au départ le marché par le biais d’une vente dans un État membre de l’UE, les droits s’épuisent automatiquement dans l’ensemble des États membres (à condition que cette vente ait été réalisée avec l’accord du propriétaire de la marque). Ainsi, un produit vendu pour la première fois en Italie peut être revendu en Espagne sans crainte de commettre une atteinte vis-à-vis de la marque.

    Cependant, si un article de marque est vendu pour la première fois en dehors de la zone UE, il est difficile de savoir si l’importation de cet article sur le marché de l’UE sans l’autorisation du propriétaire de la marque constituerait ou non une infraction. « Au fil des ans, cette question a donné lieu à un grand nombre de décisions de jurisprudence », a affirmé Horwitz.

    Une nouvelle tactique : le droit d’auteur

    Le droit des marques étant souvent insuffisant pour empêcher l’importation de produits du marché gris, un nombre croissant de propriétaires de marque tentent d’emprunter de nouvelles voies. Ils utilisent la législation sur le droit d’auteur pour protéger leur marché aux États-Unis. (D’après Klett, cette tactique n’est pas efficace en Europe car l’UE ne dispose pas d’une approche unique et harmonisée du droit d’auteur.)

    Observons la méthode employée par Omega SA. L’horloger a gravé un minuscule dessin (0,5 cm) représentant un globe sur la face inférieure de ses montres. Le dessin est invisible lorsque la montre est portée, il est donc peu probable que des individus achètent une montre haut de gamme de marque Omega dans l’intention de posséder un exemplaire de cette gravure si discrète. Néanmoins, le dessin étant protégé par le droit d’auteur, Omega est en mesure de s’opposer à l’importation de montres sur le marché gris aux États-Unis.

    La section 106(3) de la loi américaine sur le droit d’auteur autorise les titulaires de droit d’auteur à contrôler la distribution des exemplaires de leurs œuvres. Selon la section 602(a) de la loi, ces derniers ont le droit de contrôler les importations des copies de ces œuvres. Par conséquent, toute personne qui importe un exemplaire sans autorisation est coupable de violation du droit d’auteur. C’est précisément l’objet des accusations portées par Omega contre Costco Wholesale Corp., un grand distributeur minimarge qui possède des magasins à travers tous les États-Unis.

    Omega fabrique ses montres en Suisse et les vend en Europe à des prix bien inférieurs aux prix autorisés aux États-Unis. Certaines montres vendues pour la première fois en Europe et destinées à ce marché ont été revendues à Costco, qui les a importées aux États-Unis. Omega s’est opposée à cette importation et a poursuivi Costco en justice pour violation de ses droits en 2004.

    Costco a protesté qu’en vertu de la section 109(a) de la loi sur le droit d’auteur, l’importation des montres ne constituait pas une infraction. En effet, la loi américaine prévoit en matière de droit d’auteur l’application du principe de première vente, qui est tout à fait semblable à celui qui s’applique pour les marques : dès la première vente d’un exemplaire d’une œuvre protégée par droit d’auteur, le titulaire des droits ne peut plus exercer aucun contrôle sur la redistribution de cet exemplaire précis. Le droit de distribution du titulaire de droits s’est éteint et l’acheteur peut revendre, prêter ou donner l’exemplaire sans commettre de violation du droit d’auteur.

    Il existe cependant une différence importante entre le principe de la première vente en matière de droit d’auteur et celui qui s’applique aux marques en droit américain. La loi sur le droit d’auteur comporte une restriction supplémentaire. Son principe de première vente, prévu par la section 109(a), s’applique uniquement aux copies « effectuées légalement au regard du présent titre de loi ».

    Omega a rétorqué que les exemplaires du dessin gravé sur les montres ayant été faits en dehors des États-Unis, ils n’étaient pas couverts par la loi américaine sur le droit d’auteur et n’étaient donc pas concernés par le principe de la première vente. Ce à quoi Costco a répondu que, les exemplaires ayant été fabriqués par le titulaire du droit d’auteur aux États-Unis, ceux-ci devaient être considérés comme « réalisés légalement » au regard du droit américain.

    La Cour d’appel du 9e circuit des États-Unis a approuvé l’interprétation faite par Omega. Le tribunal a donc jugé en 2008 que l’application du principe de la première vente à des produits fabriqués à l’étranger « donnerait lieu à une application inacceptable de la loi américaine sur le droit d’auteur hors des frontières du pays ».

    Costco a demandé à la Cour suprême américaine de réexaminer cette décision. En octobre, la Cour a appelé le ministère américain de la Justice à constituer un acte de recours. Selon de nombreux observateurs, cette demande serait un signe que la Cour suprême pourrait accepter l’affaire.

    Si la décision du 9e circuit est maintenue, il s’agira d’une immense victoire pour les entreprises qui souhaitent mettre un terme à l’importation de produits du marché gris aux États-Unis. D’un autre côté, le coup porté aux consommateurs et aux nombreuses entreprises qui importent ou vendent ce type de produits serait énorme. En outre, selon certains spécialistes, il s’agirait d’un détournement de la loi sur le droit d’auteur.

    « L’utilisation du droit d’auteur pour appuyer la discrimination géographique en matière de prix est un faux prétexte », affirme Eric Goldman, qui enseigne le droit de la propriété intellectuelle à l’Université Santa Clara en Californie. « D’un point de vue économique, je n’ai rien contre la discrimination des prix. En revanche, utiliser le droit d’auteur pour empêcher le transport de marchandises que les gens n’achètent pas en raison de leurs aspects protégés par le droit d’auteur, ça n’a pas de sens ».

    Traduit de l’anglais par Griselda Jung

    Steven Seidenberg may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 107.20.37.62