SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Ten Questions About Internet Governance

On April 23 in Sao Paulo, Brazil, the “Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance,” also known as “NETmundial” in an allusion to the global football event that will occur later in that country, will be convened. Juan Alfonso Fernández González of the Cuban Communications Ministry and a veteran of the UN internet governance meetings, raises 10 questions that need to be answered at NETmundial.


Latest Comments
  • Justice Roberts seems to think that adjusting ones... »
  • These obscured negotiations appear to this reader ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Financement de la recherche-développement de médicaments contre les maladies oubliées : l’OMS s’apprête à publier ses recommandations

    Published on 9 December 2009 @ 11:44 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    Le groupe d’experts sur les financements innovants pour la recherche et le développement, réuni sous les auspices de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), a tenu sa troisième et dernière réunion du 30 novembre au 2 décembre. Le rapport de ce comité très secret devrait être communiqué aux Etats membres dans les semaines qui viennent, selon certaines sources.

    De son côté, le département Santé publique, innovation et propriété intellectuelle de l’OMS a publié récemment un rapport [pdf] sur l’état d’avancement des travaux sur la mise en œuvre de la stratégie mondiale et du plan d’action pour la santé publique, l’innovation et la propriété intellectuelle, qui présente au Conseil exécutif de l’Organisation le détail des activités mises en œuvre jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Un rapport séparé sur le programme de démarrage rapide est également disponible ici [pdf]. Ce programme, qui fait partie intégrante de la stratégie mondiale, a pour objectif d’identifier les mesures relevant de la responsabilité de l’OMS susceptibles d’être mises en œuvre immédiatement afin d’éviter les doublons et de faciliter la coordination.

    Les travaux du groupe d’experts

    Dans son rapport, le groupe d’experts formule des recommandations aux Etats membres concernant les sources potentielles de financements innovants pour la recherche-développement. Ces recommandation s’appuient sur l’examen de propositions qui avaient été soumises lors de deux audiences publiques et évaluées par le groupe sur la base de leur faisabilité et des informations disponibles. Selon ce qu’une source a déclaré à Intellectual Property Watch, certaines propositions étaient intéressantes mais pas suffisamment détaillées, certaines n’étaient tout simplement pas réalisables et d’autres paraissaient utiles a priori mais nécessitaient un examen plus approfondi.

    D’après certaines sources, le rapport est en cours d’achèvement; il devrait être prêt dans les semaines qui viennent, mais un doute subsiste sur le fait de savoir s’il sera rendu public ou communiqué uniquement aux États membres. Son contenu a déjà fait l’objet de fuites, des projets de texte ayant été publiés sur le site internet Wikileaks le 9 décembre. Ils peuvent être consultés ici Les documents disponibles sur ce site comprennent des projets de rapport et une « analyse comparative des propositions de sources de financement innovantes pour la recherche-développement » rédigés par le groupe d’experts et une analyse publiée par la Fédération Internationale des Association de Fabricants de Produits Pharmaceutiques sur le contenu du rapport.

    Ces mêmes sources ont précisé à Intellectual Property Watch que l’un des constats de base faits par le groupe d’experts était que des sommes conséquentes devaient être investies dans le développement de médicaments permettant de traiter les maladies dans les pays en développement. Des progrès ont été accomplis dans ce domaine, mais ils ne sont pas suffisants pour répondre aux besoins. « Le développement de ces médicaments doit être une priorité plus importante.»

    L’une des questions clés auxquelles le groupe d’experts a dû répondre a été de savoir comment récolter des fonds afin de financer la recherche-développement de médicaments contre les maladies négligées. De fait, nombre de propositions qui ont été faites avaient pour objectif de rationnaliser le processus de recherche (et potentiellement, d’en réduire les coûts) et non pas vraiment d’identifier de nouvelles sources de revenus, comme il nous l’a été précisé.

    On en trouve un exemple avec les communautés de brevets qui offrent un système « de guichet unique » proposant des licences pour des produits pharmaceutiques, ce qui permet de réduire les délais et les coûts qu’impliquent les négociations avec chaque détenteur de brevets.

    Les discussions du groupe d’expert sur les sources de financement susceptibles de générer des revenus ont tourné essentiellement, semble-t-il, autour de la question des taxes, notamment de la taxe imposée sur les billets d’avion pour financer l’achats de médicaments par UNITAID, une facilité internationale d’achats de médicaments, de la taxe Tobin, qui propose de taxer les transactions financières, et d’autres taxes sur les marchandises comme le tabac ou les produits pharmaceutiques. L’idée d’un financement par le biais de contributions volontaires, au travers d’un fonds, a également été évoquée, a indiqué une source à Intellectual Property Watch.

    La nécessité de trouver des sources innovantes pour financer la recherche et le développement explique que de nombreux bailleurs de fonds des pays en développement considèrent la création du groupe d’experts comme un résultat important dans le cadre de la stratégie mondiale pour la santé publique, l’innovation et la propriété intellectuelle. Mais ces mêmes bailleurs de fonds se sont déclarés inquiets du secret qui entoure les activités du groupe depuis l’adoption de la stratégie par les Etats membres en mai 2008.

    Vers un renforcement du programme de présélection

    La mise en œuvre de la stratégie mondiale concerne essentiellement trois domaines : l’accès à l’innovation, le renforcement des capacités ainsi que la mobilisation de ressources et de financements viables, comme l’a confirmé à Intellectual Property Watch Precious Matsoso, responsable du département Santé publique, innovation et propriété intellectuelle qui est chargé de la mise en œuvre de la stratégie mondiale.

    Si l’on en croit le rapport sur la stratégie mondiale, les principaux domaines d’action concernent le transfert de technologie et le renforcement des capacités.

    Afin de rationnaliser les processus d’homologation des médicaments, l’OMS travaille actuellement sur l’élaboration de mécanismes permettant de renforcer son programme de présélection des médicaments. Le « programme de présélection peut permettre de soutenir les activités liées à la recherche et au développement, mais c’est un domaine nouveau qui reste à définir », a souligné Precious Matsoso.

    Il ressort du rapport que les activités de renforcement ont consistéprincipalement à élargir la portée de la présélection des médicaments à des produits contre les maladies tropicales négligées, la grippe pandémique et dans le domaine de la santé génésique et à présélectionner trois nouveaux laboratoires de contrôle de la qualité (portant le total de ces laboratoires à 11).

    Par ailleurs, le département Médicaments essentiels et politiques pharmaceutiques de l’OMS collabore avec UNITAID à la mise en place d’une communauté de brevets pour les médicaments, notamment pour les médicaments contre le VIH/sida, a précisé Precious Matsoso. En partenariat avec la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le commerce et le développement (CNUCED) et le Centre international pour le commerce et le développement durable (ICTSD) et avec le soutien de la Commission européenne, il a également mis sur pied un projet qui vise à améliorer l’accès aux médicaments dans les pays en développement en favorisant la production locale et le transfert de technologie, a-t-elle ajouté.

    L’objectif de ce projet «est d’identifier les principaux obstacles à la production locale dans les pays en développement» et à promouvoir le transfert de technologie à la fois entre les pays du Nord et du Sud et entre les pays du Sud, et non pas seulement vers les pays les moins développés comme le prévoient les dispositions relatives au transfert de technologie de l’accord sur les ADPIC. Les premiers travaux porteront sur l’analyse des bailleurs de fonds et des études de cas. Les données préliminaires devraient être disponibles cette semaine.

    Kaitlin Mara may be reached at kmara@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.227.5.234