SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Conférence de Copenhague: incertitude sur les droits de propriété intellectuelle

    Published on 13 November 2009 @ 6:45 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    BARCELONE – Les négociations sur le climat se sont achevées le 6 novembre après une semaine de discussions. Malgré les assurances données par la plupart des délégations sur le fait que tout était possible lors de la Conférence de Copenhague sur le changement climatique qui aura lieu en décembre, l’incertitude demeure sur de nombreuses questions qui concernent notamment le financement, la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, le transfert de technologie et la nature de l’accord qui sera conclu à Copenhague.

    Une réunion de la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (CCNUCC) avait été organisée à Barcelone du 2 au 6 novembre afin de préparer un projet de texte pour la réunion finale de Copenhague qui se tiendra du 7 au 18 décembre. Les pourparlers ont été menés dans le cadre de petits groupes appelés groupes de contact.

    Dans le cadre des discussions, une attention particulière a été portée aux droits de propriété intellectuelle qui, bien que n’ayant pas fait l’objet de pourparlers officiels durant la semaine, ont été mentionnés non seulement dans le document informel sur le transfert de technologie, mais aussi dans la version finale du document informel concernant les mesures d’atténuation publiée le dernier jour.

    Ces documents serviront de base aux discussions qui auront lieu à Copenhague, des discussions qui promettent d’être animées compte tenu de la position dualiste adoptée par certains pays sur la question de la propriété intellectuelle.

    Un nouveau document informel sur l’adoption de mesures renforcées en matière de développement et de transfert de technologie a également été publié par le groupe de contact le dernier jour de la réunion en remplacement de la version publiée mardi, sous le numéro 36, laquelle était contestée par des pays en développement, notamment, l’Inde, la Bolivie, le Bangladesh, et le Groupe des 77, auxquels s’est joint la Chine qui était opposée à ce que les questions liées à la propriété intellectuelle soient retirées du document principal. Elles ont été réintroduites par le nouveau document publié sous le numéro 47.

    Dans le document non officiel numéro 36, les questions portant sur la propriété intellectuelle avaient été reléguées à une annexe, une note de bas de page mentionnant que les questions contenues dans cette annexe pourraient être discutées à une date ultérieure à la Conférence de Copenhague, au grand mécontentement des pays en développement.

    Le 5 novembre, l’Inde, la Bolivie et le Bangladesh ont soumis des amendements au document numéro 36 afin que le texte qui avait été déplacé dans l’annexe soient réintroduit dans le texte principal du projet, selon Ajay Mathur, directeur général du Bureau indien de l’efficacité énergétique (Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency). Le document non officiel numéro 47 a été publié le 6 novembre.

    Le Groupe des 77, ainsi que la Chine ont également déposé des amendements. Un paragraphe 9bis a ainsi été ajouté dans le document numéro 47 qui prévoit l’adoption de mesures spécifiques permettant de lever les obstacles au développement et au transfert de technologie, ainsi que des paragraphes 10bis, 10bis1, 10bis2, et 10bis3 reprenant le texte du document numéro 29 qui a permis de lancer les discussions à Barcelone.

    Le document numéro 47 est disponible en anglais ici [version pdf]
    Le document numéro 36 est disponible en anglais ici [version PDF]

    Les droits de propriété intellectuelle sont importants pour tout le monde dans ce contexte, a indiqué à Intellectual Property Watch Knihiko Shimada, président du groupe de contact sur le renforcement des mesures concernant le développement et le transfert de technologie et coordonnateur des politiques au ministère japonais de l’environnement. Les pays développés ont besoin que les droits de propriété intellectuelle, en tant qu’ils représentent un encouragement à l’innovation, bénéficient d’une protection solide. À l’inverse, les pays en développement voient dans ces droits un obstacle majeur au transfert de technologie et demandent aux pays développés de faire preuve d’une plus grande flexibilité dans ce domaine.

    «Le groupe de négociation de la CCNUCC sur le transfert de technologie devrait prendre conseil auprès de groupes d’experts en matière de propriété intellectuelle tels que l’Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle ou l’Organisation mondiale du commerce », a t-il indiqué. Des représentants de ces deux organisations étaient présents à Barcelone.

    D’après des représentants des pays développés, les pays européens, ainsi que les Etats-Unis et la plupart des autres pays développés considèrent que les questions liées à la propriété intellectuelle n’ont pas leur place dans des négociations sur le changement climatique.

    Le Groupe de contact sur les mesures d’atténuation réintroduit la question des droits de propriété intellectuelle dans les discussions

    Suite à l’offensive menée par les pays en développement le 5 novembre, une mention sur les droits de propriété intellectuelle a été introduite dans un nouveau document informel, qui portait le numéro 42 et remplaçait le document numéro 30, sur les approches susceptibles de favoriser l’adoption de mesures d’atténuation et de renforcer leur efficacité. Le document numéro 42 est disponible en anglais ici [version PDF]

    La formulation utilisée dans ce nouveau document n’est pas sans rappeler celle du document numéro 47. Dans les deux documents, il est précisé que la question des droits de propriété intellectuelle sera discutée à Copenhague dans la mesure où elle n’aura pas été officiellement débattue à Barcelone.

    Dans une conférence de presse, l’Inde a déclaré qu’elle n’était pas prête à un compromis mou, faisant référence à la crainte des pays en développement que les pays développés optent pour l’adoption d’un cadre politique plutôt que pour un accord juridiquement contraignant.

    La Conférence de Copenhague peut néanmoins déboucher sur un résultat positif, a indiqué un représentant indien. « Nous ne baissons pas les bras » a-t-il ajouté. Selon lui, les progrès accomplis sont décevant mais les négociations sont complexes et mettent en jeu des intérêts économiques importants.

    L’Alliance des petits États insulaires a appelé à la conclusion à Copenhague d’un traité juridiquement contraignant, indiquant que la volonté politique était le principal ingrédient pour y parvenir. «Nous ne pouvons pas attendre plus longtemps», a indiqué un représentant.

    Pour le Fonds mondial pour la vie sauvage (World Wildlife Fund), la réunion de Barcelone a été la réunion de l’ambition perdue des pays développés et de l’ambition retrouvée de l’Afrique qui a montré les muscles lors de la réunion, le groupe des pays africains ayant menacé de boycotter les discussions sur le Protocole de Kyoto au début de la semaine.
    Le Groupe des 77 et la Chine ont estimé que peu de progrès avaient été accomplis et que le principal problème résidait dans les objectifs de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre sur lesquels les pays développés refusaient de s’engager. Lors d’une conférence de presse, son représentant a indiqué que le Groupe entendait que des engagements justes et équitables soient pris en matière de transfert de technologie, y compris en ce qui concerne les droits de propriété intellectuelle.

    La CCNUCC espère toujours qu’un traité fort sur la lutte contre le changement climatique sera conclu à Copenhague et appelle les pays à une combinaison forte d’engagement et de compromis pour y parvenir, a précisé Yvo de Boer, Secrétaire exécutif de la CCNUCC, lors d’une conférence de presse.

    La question du changement climatique n’a jamais figuré ci-haut dans l’agenda des dirigeants du monde, a relevé Yvo de Boer ; Nous devons en tirer parti à Copenhague. Si un traité devait être conclu, ses termes devront être négociés à Copenhague. « Après Copenhague, les promesses devront céder la place aux actes», a-t-il ajouté.

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     

    Comments

    1. Frédéric Couchet (fcouchet) 's status on Saturday, 14-Nov-09 15:55:37 UTC - Identi.ca says:

      [...] http://www.ip-watch.org/weblog/2009/11/13/conference-de-copenhague-incertitude-sur-les-droits-de-pr… a few seconds ago from emacs-identicamode [...]


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 107.20.37.62