SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Analysis: Monkey In The Middle Of Selfie Copyright Dispute

The recent case of a monkey selfie that went viral on the web raised thorny issues of ownership between a (human) photographer and Wikimedia. Two attorneys from Morrison & Foerster sort out the relevant copyright law.


Latest Comments
  • A VPN is a virtual private network, which generall... »
  • Interesting case. I would have hoped for more ela... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Brevetage des gènes: la résistance se renforce aux Etats-Unis et en Europe

    Published on 14 September 2009 @ 9:00 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    L’action en justice intentée récemment contre le Bureau américain des brevets et des marques de commerce, une entreprise de biotechnologie et une fondation concernant des brevets sur les gènes associés au cancer a permis d’attirer l’attention de l’opinion internationale sur la question du brevetage des gènes humains, une pratique contre laquelle un groupe d’associations influentes a exprimé son opposition le 27 août.

    En mai, l’Union américaine pour les libertés civiles (ACLU) et la Fondation des Brevets Publics (Public Patent Foundation) ont engagé une procédure d’opposition contre des brevets concernant deux gènes impliqués dans les cancers du sein et des ovaires. L’ACLU considère sur son site internet que ces brevets sont contraires à la Constitution et illégaux dans la mesure où ils entravent la recherche scientifique et limitent les possibilités de traitement pour les malades.

    La plainte (en anglais), qui a été déposée au nom de quatre organisations scientifiques, de chercheurs, de groupes de santé, de conseillers en génétique et de femmes, visait le Bureau américain des brevets et des marques de commerce (USPTO), l’entreprise de biotechnologie Myriad Genetics et la Fondation de recherche de l’université de l’Utah qui détient aujourd’hui les brevets accordés par l’USPTO à Myriad Genetics sur les gènes connus sous le nom de BRCA1 et BRCA2.

    Il est généralement admis que certaines mutations des gènes BRCA1 et BRCA2 entraînent une prédisposition au cancer du sein et des ovaires. L’annulation des brevets devait permettre, selon l’ACLU, de favoriser les recherches sur ces gènes et la mise au point de nouveaux tests de dépistage et essais cliniques.

    Le 27 août, l’Association américaine de médecine, la Société américaine de génétique humaine, le Collège américain des obstétriciens et des gynécologues, le Collège américain d’embryologie et la Société de médecine de l’État de New York ont rédigé un mémoire à titre d’amicus curiae (en anglais) soutenant l’initiative de l’ACLU.

    Selon Shobita Parthasarathy, co-directrice du programme science, technologie et politique publique de l’université du Michigan, l’action intentée par l’ACLU ne visait pas simplement à faire annuler certains brevets, mais plus généralement à remettre en cause l’octroi de brevets concernant des gènes.

    D’après l’ACLU, près de 20 pour cent des gènes humains sont brevetés aux États-Unis. Pour autant, l’argument selon lequel l’extension de la loi des brevets aux gènes humains serait contraire à la Constitution pourrait ne pas tenir devant la cour, a indiqué Richard Gold, professeur à l’université McGill et président de Innovation Partnership, un groupe d’experts internationaux sur la biotechnologie, l’innovation et la propriété intellectuelle. La raison en est que cette extension n’a pas été décidée par le Congrès américain mais par l’USPTO sur la base des décisions rendues par les tribunaux.

    Le 13 juillet, l’USPTO, l’université de l’Utah et Myriad Genetics ont demandé l’annulation de la plainte au motif que celle-ci n’était pas fondée. «Le système des brevets a fonctionné exactement comme il le devait », a précisé l’entreprise Myriad Genetics dans sa demande. (La demande de l’USPTO peut être consultée ici, en anglais ; celle de l’entreprise Myriad Genetics et de l’université de l’Utah est disponible ici, en anglais.

    Des brevets contestés en Europe

    En 2001, Myriad Genetics a bénéficié de plusieurs brevets européens concernant les mutations des gènes BRCA1 et BRCA2 et les tests permettant de les détecter. Cependant, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, responsable du département Génétique de l’Institut Curie et professeur de génétique médicale à l’université Paris-Descartes, a pu démontrer, grâce à un test de dépistage propre, que la méthode brevetée ne permettait pas de détecter 10% des mutations attendues.

    Avec le soutien d’autres institutions puis, par la suite, de plusieurs entreprises européennes de génétique et du Parlement européen, l’Institut a décidé de contester la validité des brevets accordés à Myriad, lesquels ont été révoqués totalement ou partiellement par l’Office européen des brevets en 2004 et en 2005. L’entreprise Myriad a fait appel des deux décisions. En novembre 2008, la Chambre de recours techniques de l’OEB a partiellement confirmé le brevet déposé par la Fondation de recherche de l’université de l’Utah concernant la méthode « permettant de diagnostiquer une prédisposition au cancer du sein et au cancer ovarien associée à certaines mutations du gène BRCA1 isolé du génome ».

    D’après l’Institut Curie, cette décision constitue un revirement dans la mesure où l’Office avait estimé dans une décision antérieure que les mutations brevetées par Myriad Genetics ne satisfaisaient pas aux exigences de la Convention sur le brevet européen.

    Rainer Osterwalder, porte-parole de l’OEB a cependant indiqué que la décision rendue par la Chambre de recours techniques en novembre 2008 n’était pas fondée sur des décisions antérieures et ne pouvaient dès lors être anticipée. Il n’y a donc pas eu de revirement.

    Pour Alain Gallochat, consultant et représentant de l’OEB, l’objectif des plaignants n’étaient pas de contester le principe de la brevetabilité des gènes mais les brevets octroyés à Myriad Genetics. «La décision de novembre ne marque pas de revirement dans l’approche adoptée par l’OEB», a-t-il indiqué.

    Depuis cette décision, il n’y a eu aucune tentative de la part de Myriad Genetics et de la Fondation de recherche de l’université de l’Utah pour faire respecter leurs droits en Europe, selon Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet.

    En France, 15 laboratoires privés et certains laboratoires d’universités utilisent des tests de dépistages des gènes BRCA1 et BRCA2. Ces tests ne sont pas exactement les mêmes que ceux brevetés par Myriad Genetics mais l’objectif est le même, a-t-elle précisé, ajoutant qu’aucun monopole n’était possible en Europe concernant ces tests, seules des redevances pouvant être exigées.

    Pour Shobita Parthasarathy, il existe une différence fondamentale entre les Etats-Unis et l’Europe qui tient au fait qu’il n’existe pas de procédure d’opposition aux Etats-Unis mais seulement une procédure de réexamen dont les conditions sont très strictes. L’Europe est plus ouverte à la contestation de tiers en général, a-t-elle souligné.

    Il est peu probable que la décision rendue par les autorités américaine sur les brevets de Myriad Genetics et le fait que l’USPTO accorde des brevets sur des gènes ait une influence sur la décision de l’OEB, a indiqué Rainer Osterwalder étant donné que l’Office est lié uniquement par la Convention sur le brevet européen.

    Dans le domaine de la biotechnologue, l’OEB accorde moins de brevets que dans les autres domaines, a-t-il précisé, ajoutant que l’Office privilégiait une approche très restrictive concernant les brevets génétiques.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Véronique Sauron

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.225.24.227