SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Conseil de l’Europe : l’accès à l’internet est un droit fondamental

    Published on 12 June 2009 @ 7:09 pm

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    L’argument souvent utilisé par les législateurs contre la communication Internet qui veut que ce qui est valable dans l’univers physique l’est aussi en ligne a été utilisé par le Conseil de l’Europe dans une nouvelle résolution concernant les droits fondamentaux en ligne.

    Le Conseil de l’Europe est une institution qui a son siège à Strasbourg, en France. Il comprend 47 membres parmi lesquels les Etats membres de l’Union européenne.

    Dans une longue résolution qui définit les priorités du Conseil en matière de médias et d’internet pour les cinq prochaines années, les ministres des médias et des nouveaux moyens de communication, qui se sont réunis à Reykjavik, en Islande le 29 mai, ont souligné « les droits fondamentaux et les normes et valeurs du Conseil de l’Europe s’appliquent indifféremment aux services d’information et de communication dans les environnements en ligne ou dans l’univers physique. »

    Les ministres présents ont appelé à examiner dans quelle mesure l’accès universel à l’internet devrait être développé par les Etats membres dans le cadre de la prestation de service public. Les obstacles empêchant l’accès à l’internet dans les pays membres, le flux transfrontalier ou les éventuels problèmes liés aux infrastructures critiques figurent à l’ordre du jour des futurs débats du Conseil de l’Europe.

    Les obstacles à l’accès à Internet ne limitent pas seulement la capacité des citoyens à acheter en ligne, ils portent également atteinte à leurs droits fondamentaux compte tenu du nombre croissant de contenus média et politique qui sont mis en ligne, ont-ils indiqué.

    «Ce n’est pas un jeu», a précisé Jan Kleijssen, Directeur des activités normatives au Conseil de l’Europe. « Les campagnes électorales comme celles menées par le président Obama ou, dans une certaine mesure, la campagne relative à l’élection du Parlement européen, se déroulent aujourd’hui sur Internet. Empêcher l’accès à cette information porte clairement atteinte aux droits civils et politiques des peuples.

    L’accès Internet universel

    Des législations comme la loi française autorisant un organe administratif à couper l’accès à Internet des contrevenants présumés au droit d’auteur posent la question de la proportionnalité des sanctions. Des experts du Conseil s’attendaient en fait à ce que la loi française, dénommée loi HADOPI, qui prévoit d’autoriser la coupure de l’accès Internet des contrevenants qui se sont rendus coupables à trois reprises de violations des droits d’auteur, arrive fasse un jour l’objet d’un recours devant la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme, a expliqué Jan Kleijssen.

    Le texte de la résolution du Conseil des ministres de Reykjavik est plus prudent et réaffirme « l’importance de protéger le droit d’auteur. » Il note néanmoins qu’« une approche centrée sur l’individu doit également accorder à chacun d’exercer son droit à la liberté d’expression et d’information, et le droit d’utiliser les nouveaux services de communication pour participer à la vie sociale, politique, culturelle et économique, sans empiéter sur la dignité humaine et sur les droits des autres. »

    L’accès à l’information sur Internet figure en bonne place dans tout le texte de la résolution, les ministres estimant même que « l’accès universel à l’internet devrait être développé par les Etats membres dans le cadre de la prestation de service public. ». Cette obligation pourrait rendre inapplicable les coupures internet prévues par la loi Hadopi.

    Préoccupations concernant les conséquences des législations anti-terroristes

    L’une des résolutions adoptées lors de la réunion de Reykjavik concernait les conséquences négatives des législations anti-terroristes sur la liberté d’expression et d’information.

    Les ministres ont souligné qu’il existait « des inquiétudes grandissantes sur les conséquences du terrorisme et des mesures prises par les Etats membres pour le combattre sur ces libertés. »

    Dans certains cas, les législations anti-terroristes restreignant la liberté d’expression et d’information sont trop générales, ne fixent pas de limites claires en matière d’intervention des autorités ou manquent de garanties procédurales suffisantes pour empêcher des abus », ont-ils indiqué.

    Présent à Reykjavik, Frederick Riehl, de l’OFCOM, l’autorité fédérale de régulation du marché des télécommunications et de la radiodiffusion en Suisse, a estimé que les mesures visant à combattre le cybercrime et le terrorisme ne devaient pas conduire à des abus de l’Etat ou de l’industrie. » La mise en place de mesures de contrôle des internautes, l’utilisation de filtres pour l’accès à Internet et la mise en ligne de données personnelles doivent être pleinement justifiées par la loi, a-t-il ajouté.

    La surveillance des journalistes et le projet de directive européenne concernant la rétention des données personnelles ont également été envisagés avec scepticisme. Dans la résolution sur «une nouvelle conception des médias», les ministres ont souligné qu’il était nécessaire «de déterminer dans quelle mesure la rétention d’informations, le traitement des données à caractère personnel et les techniques ou pratiques de profilage entravent la participation libre de chacun, le droit à la liberté d’expression et d’information et d’autres droits fondamentaux. » Le texte précise également que «Des orientations appropriées devraient être formulées pour protéger les droits des utilisateurs.»

    Dans la déclaration sur le « terrorisme », les ministres ont pris d’importants engagements, notamment celui « d’examiner régulièrement notre législation et/ou notre pratique nationales pour veiller à ce que tout impact des mesures de lutte contre le terrorisme sur le droit à la liberté d’expression et d’information soit conforme aux normes du Conseil de l’Europe, avec une attention particulière portée à la jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme. »

    La délégation russe a présenté une réserve concernant cet engagement. Mais les organisations de protection des droits civils ont demandé à ce qu’ils soient pris très au sérieux. «Les Etats membres ne doivent pas passer les années qui viennent à discuter des critères applicables», a averti un représentant de l’Open Society Institute, qui a ajouté que les critères définis étaient clairs et qu’ils constituaient un élément essentiel des divers instruments juridiques adoptés par le Conseil de l’Europe.

    Renforcement de l’action du Conseil concernant la gouvernance de l’internet

    Un pas important a été accompli par les ministres concernant le flux transfrontalier et la liberté d’expression, qui ont invité le Conseil de l’Europe «à examiner la faisabilité de l’élaboration d’un instrument destiné à préserver ou à renforcer la protection du flux transfrontalier du trafic internet. » Il ressort de la Résolution que les Etats membres pourraient devoir rendre compte devant la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme de toute violation des droits énoncés.

    «L’Article 10 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme est particulièrement pertinent à cet égard dans la mesure où les droits et libertés qu’ils protègent sont garantis « sans considération de frontières », ont-ils précisé.

    L’obligation faite aux Etats membres concerne également le sujet très controversé de la gouvernance de l’internet et de la gestion des ressources critiques d’Internet telles que le système de nom de domaine (DNS) géré par l’ICANN (Internet Cooperation for Assigned Names and Numbers). Dans la déclaration, les ministres ont appelé tous les acteurs, publics ou privés, à «explorer des pistes, sur la base des dispositifs actuels, pour que les ressources critiques de l’internet soient gérées dans l’intérêt commun en tant que bien public, de manière à garantir la valeur de service public de l’internet, dans le plein respect du droit international, y compris des droits de l’homme. »

    Bien qu’ils n’aient pas fait l’objet de discussions approfondies lors de la réunion de Reykjavik, les nouveaux noms actuellement en préparation à l’ICANN ont également été considérés comme un aspect important. Frederick Riehl a, par ailleurs, indiqué que le droit des utilisateurs devait arrivé en tête des priorités.

    Dans les années à venir, le Conseil de l’Europe sera plus actif dans les discussions sur la gouvernance de l’internet, selon les ministres, et s’engagera «le cas échéant, à promouvoir une surveillance internationale de la gestion des ressources critiques de l’internet, ainsi qu’une obligation de rendre compte. » En mettant cette question sur la table, les ministres ont effleuré la question des futurs accords de gouvernance de l’internet.

    En septembre de cette année, le projet commun d’accord qui lie l’ICANN et le département américain du commerce a expiré. Dans leurs conclusions formelles, les ministres ont noté que «Bien que [les] statuts et règlements [de l'ICANN] lui imposent de coopérer avec les organisations internationales compétentes et de mener ses activités conformément aux principes applicables du droit international, des conventions internationales pertinentes et du droit local, aucune disposition n’établit les modalités de sa responsabilité » à ce jour.

    Reconsidérer la notion de média

    Outre une coopération renforcée, il a été jugé indispensable de promouvoir une approche multipartite entre les gouvernements, l’industrie et la société civile afin de résoudre les questions liées à l’Internet. Pour les ministres, «La gouvernance de l’internet est un exemple d’organisation innovante et d’adaptation mutuelle de société et de technologie dans le monde entier dans le but d’assurer l’ouverture et la neutralité d’internet.»

    La coopération des différentes parties prenantes est également mentionnée concernant les autres initiatives qui doivent être mises en place dans les années à venir et les discussions générales relatives aux nouvelles normes qui pourraient être nécessaires pour réglementer les nouveaux médias de communication apparentés à l’internet.

    Jusqu’à présent, les médias traditionnels fournissaient les critères de base en matière de réglementation mais comme de nouveaux médias et services de communication de masse prennent le dessus, la conférence a appelé à reconsidérer la notion de média. Des aspects tels que la protection des données privées sur Internet, en particulier la non-traçabilité et la protection des enfants ont été mentionnés parmi les principaux thèmes susceptibles de faire l’objet de nouvelles normes.

    Interrogé sur l’équilibre entre le droit à la liberté d’une part et le droit de protéger les intérêts individuels d’autre part, Jan Kleijssen a souligné le fait que cela faisait partie du rôle habituel de l’organisation. S’agissant du terrorisme, par exemple, le Conseil dispose d’un instrument permettant de faciliter la coopération entre les Etats dans le cadre de l’arrestation de terroristes. Une fois arrêtés, les suspects sont protégés par un autre instrument qui leur donne des droits, ce qui permet d’éviter des détentions du type de celles qui ont lieu à Guantanamo. Enfin, un autre instrument existe qui permet de traiter les causes profondes du terrorisme, a indiqué Jan Kleijssen.

    On retrouve cette double approche concernant les médias traditionnels et les nouveaux médias. Non seulement les ministres ont appelé à reconsidérer la notion de média et à mieux comprendre l’utilisation qui en est faite, mais ils ont également essayé de proposer des solutions pour les médias traditionnels en appelant à repenser les médias de service public et à résoudre les problèmes liés à la crise financière. Les modalités de financement des services publics de médias en ligne et traditionnels ont également fait l’objet de discussions.

    Reste à savoir jusqu’où ira le Conseil et quels efforts seront entrepris pour promouvoir l’Article 10 sur l’Internet. Aucune décision n’a encore été prise sur le fait de savoir si le Conseil proposera une convention ou seulement des lignes directrices ou des recommandations non contraignantes.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Véronique Sauron

    Monika Ermert may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     

    Comments

    1. Lucien David LANGMAN says:

      Légiférer sans entrer dans le fond du dossier avec les vrais spécialistes du terrain est et restera échec programmé.

      Politiques, femmes et hommes de bureaux, journalistes et professeurs n’ont que théories et à l’instar de certains juristes dîts spécialisés que les connaissances du livre, des livres d’hier et d’avant hier. Il est et reste nécessaire de les accompagner, de les faire s’accompagner des sachants au fait de l’état de l’art simple principe de précaution.

      Lucien David LANGMAN
      Expert en Contrefaçon et PI-IP


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 46.249.58.68