SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »
  • 'Business methods were generally not patentable in... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Avanza propuesta de tratado de la OMPI sobre limitaciones y excepciones a los derechos de autor

    Published on 4 June 2009 @ 11:51 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    En mayo, el Comité de derechos de autor de la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual llegó a un acuerdo sobre un plan para examinar una propuesta de tratado sobre excepciones a los derechos de autor que permitan a los discapacitados visuales y a otras personas tener un mejor acceso a material de lectura.

    El Comité Permanente de la OMPI sobre Derecho de Autor y Derechos Conexos (SCCR), reunido entre el 25 y el 29 de mayo, examinó las propuestas en materia de limitaciones y excepciones, derechos de los organismos de radiodifusión y derechos sobre las interpretaciones o ejecuciones audiovisuales. En cuanto a las limitaciones y excepciones, el Comité examinó principalmente la propuesta de un tratado vinculante que contempla excepciones para las personas con discapacidad visual, así como para las bibliotecas y archivos.

    El Comité debatió intensamente las conclusiones de la Presidencia, y revisó tres versiones antes de alcanzar un acuerdo final en un cuarto texto.

    Reunido hasta altas horas de la noche, el Comité convino en incluir en el orden del día la propuesta de tratado para las personas con discapacidad visual, junto con otras propuestas o aportaciones sobre limitaciones y excepciones, para que se examine en la próxima reunión del SCCR; la fecha aún no se ha fijado, pero normalmente tendrá lugar en noviembre. Alentó asimismo a la Secretaría a seguir avanzando en la iniciativa que lidera para reunir a través de una “plataforma” a los sectores interesados en la cuestión de las personas con discapacidad visual.

    Los textos provisionales y finales de las conclusiones de la reunión del SCCR se encuentran disponibles en www.ip-watch.org.

    Brasil, Ecuador y Paraguay, que presentaron la propuesta al Comité, “han canalizado a través de la OMPI una solicitud legítima y urgente de la sociedad civil”, según dijeron a Intellectual Property Watch algunos miembros de la delegación brasilera.

    “Por primera vez en la historia, se señala a la atención del SCCR un proyecto de tratado sobre excepciones y limitaciones”, afirmaron. La propuesta de tratado, que surgió de la Unión Mundial de Ciegos, “recibió un amplio respaldo y los Países miembros se mostraron abiertos y dispuestos a examinarla”, añadieron los brasileros.

    “Este ha sido un cambio muy importante de lo que nos gustaría llamar el ‘nuevo paradigma’, que supone dar la misma importancia a los intereses privados de los titulares de derechos y a los derechos humanos de los ciudadanos”, comentó posteriormente Flavio Arosemena, director nacional de derechos de autor del Ecuador. “La OMPI acaba de dar un primer paso hacia la evaluación del sistema de propiedad intelectual como una herramienta para el desarrollo, y contribuir a mejorar el nivel de vida de todas las personas, y no sólo de los titulares de derechos”.

    Jukka Liedes, Presidente del Comité, dijo que la propuesta de tratado seguirá el “procedimiento normal” y las delegaciones celebrarán consultas en el plano nacional. La “maquinaria pesada” se ha puesto en marcha, señaló. “En las organizaciones internacionales, las propuestas de tratados forman parte de la actividad cotidiana normal”, dijo Liedes, añadiendo que “a veces pueden surgir convenios”.

    El Comité también ha manifestado una “nueva voluntad” para examinar un tratado de la OMPI sobre interpretaciones y ejecuciones audiovisuales negociado por última vez en 2000, dijo Liedes. Escuchó asimismo intervenciones de los sectores interesados, principalmente de la industria, acerca de una propuesta de tratado en materia de derechos de los organismos de radiodifusión y mantuvo abierta la cuestión para el programa futuro. La sesión de la semana se abrió con una reunión de información de un día acerca de los derechos de los organismos de radiodifusión.

    El texto final se redactó el último día en una reunión a puerta cerrada con los coordinadores regionales, más uno o dos delegados de cada región. Algunos de los principales cambios entre el tercer y el cuarto proyecto de conclusiones incluyeron referencias ampliadas a un “marco global e integrador” para las excepciones y limitaciones. Este punto reflejó la preocupación del Grupo Africano de que el Comité también examine abiertamente la cuestión de las bibliotecas y la educación, según comentaron algunas fuentes.

    Adicionalmente, en el texto final se formularon de manera más equilibrada las opiniones expresadas durante la semana acerca del tratado sobre las personas con discapacidad visual. El texto dice simplemente que algunos respaldaron la propuesta de tratado vinculante, otros manifestaron su deseo de tener más tiempo para analizarla, algunos se mostraron dispuestos a seguir adelante con la labor a partir de un marco global e integrador, y otros consideraron que era “prematuro” mantener deliberaciones sobre cualquier instrumento.

    Este punto se alejaba de lo que se había informado a mediados de la semana en cuanto a que la gran mayoría de las intervenciones sobre el tratado lo apoyaban firmemente, pero los partidarios del mismo no se opusieron a la redacción final.

    Algunos observadores señalaron que en el lenguaje diplomático “prematuro” significa oposición. Esta fue la posición del Grupo B de países desarrollados.

    Representantes de los países del Grupo B, como los Estados Unidos y Alemania (que habla en nombre del Grupo B), se mostraron reticentes durante la semana a discutir la propuesta de tratado por fuera de la sala de reuniones, quizás reflejando el carácter delicado de su posición, que podría interpretarse en el sentido de que estaban privilegiando los intereses económicos por encima de los derechos humanos.

    El procedimiento que se espera seguirá la propuesta de tratado y otras propuestas formuladas aparece reforzado en el proyecto final de conclusiones con el cambio de la frase “será considerada” por “será examinada”. Se modifica asimismo lo referente a la plataforma de los sectores interesados de manera que se destaca la inclusión de los países en desarrollo, así como la intención de celebrar la próxima reunión en el Sur (las dos primeras se celebraron en Ginebra y Londres, respectivamente).

    En el texto final se mantiene el lenguaje acordado relativo al procedimiento que seguirá el proyecto de cuestionario circulado por la Secretaría, cuyo propósito es determinar la situación de las limitaciones y excepciones vigentes en los Estados miembros. Sin embargo, el texto incluye otros aspectos adicionales sobre los que debería centrarse más el cuestionario, desde las excepciones y limitaciones de índole social, cultural y religiosa, hasta la transferencia de tecnología, las bibliotecas, la educación y la investigación. En el cuestionario se añadirán preguntas sobre la dimensión transfronteriza de algunas de estas cuestiones.

    Según aparece en el texto final, la Secretaría tiene por mandato finalizar antes de la próxima reunión un estudio sobre las limitaciones y excepciones en el ámbito de la educación, incluida la educación a distancia y las cuestiones transfronterizas. Se solicitó además a la Secretaría que prepare documentos analíticos en los que se señalen, sobre la base de todos los estudios, “las características más importantes” de las limitaciones y excepciones, se aborde la dimensión internacional y “eventualmente se categorizen las principales soluciones legislativas”.

    Parte de la demora en el último día tuvo que ver con la cuestión de si se debía o no celebrar una reunión informativa en la próxima reunión del SCCR. Algunos miembros querían que ésta se centrara en la propuesta de tratado sobre excepciones para las personas con discapacidad visual, mientras que otros querían que se examinara la cuestión de las limitaciones y excepciones en un ámbito más amplio, según comentaron los participantes. Al final se abandonó la idea de llevar a cabo dicha reunión.

    Chris Friend, de la Unión Mundial de Ciegos, que lanzó la propuesta de tratado junto con un grupo de expertos encargado de la redacción que se reunió en Washington, D.C. en agosto de 2008, dijo después que los grupos que trabajaban en nombre de los lectores con discapacidad visual, como la Unión Mundial de Ciegos y el consorcio DAISY, se “han integrado en ese proceso” con los defensores sobre el terreno en cada región del mundo. A su entender, los gobiernos vendrán a la siguiente reunión del SCCR en noviembre “dispuestos a examinar la cuestión”.

    Los partidarios del tratado sostienen que la propuesta de los sectores interesados no puede abordar todas las cuestiones relacionadas con la grave escasez de material impreso o electrónico que afecta a los lectores con discapacidad visual, especialmente en los países en desarrollo. Según la Unión Mundial de Ciegos, que elaboró originalmente la propuesta de tratado, alrededor del 90 por ciento de las personas con deficiencias visuales vive en países de ingresos bajos o moderados.

    Cerca del 95 por ciento de los libros nunca esta disponible para las personas ciegas y los lectores con deficiencias visuales, que utilizan formatos alternativos, tales como material en audio, en Braille o en letra grande, dijo al Comité la Unión Mundial de Ciegos. La mayoría de los libros en formato accesible son producidos por organizaciones caritativas especializadas con recursos limitados.

    Traducido del inglés por Giselle Martínez

    William New may be reached at wnew@ip-watch.ch.

     

    Comments

    1. Página em Branco » Blog Archive » Avanza propuesta de tratado de la OMPI sobre limitaciones y excepciones a los derechos de autor says:

      [...] Leia mais Twitter This Usuario: [...]


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.167.154.36