SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Interns Summer 2013

IP-Watch interns Brittany Ngo (Yale Graduate School of Public Health) and Caitlin McGivern (University of Law, London) talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »
  • If this goes ahead, as the EU will "speak" for all... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Avancées quant à la proposition de traité de l’OMPI sur les limitations et les exceptions au droit d’auteur

    Published on 4 June 2009 @ 11:56 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    En mai dernier, le comité du droit d’auteur de l’Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle (OMPI) s’est accordé sur la manière d’aborder la proposition de traité sur les exceptions au droit d’auteur en faveur des déficients visuels et sur d’autres dispositions permettant un meilleur accès aux ouvrages de lecture.

    Le Comité permanent du droit d’auteur et des droits connexes (SCCR) de l’OMPI s’est réuni du 25 au 29 mai pour aborder les questions des limitations et des exceptions, des droits des organismes de radiodiffusion et des droits liés aux interprétations et exécutions audiovisuelles. En ce qui concerne les limitations et les exceptions, le comité s’est tout d’abord concentré sur une proposition de traité à caractère obligatoire en faveur des déficients visuels. La possibilité d’une exception portant sur d’autres utilisateurs tels que les bibliothèques et les services d’archivage a également été discutée.

    Les conclusions de la présidence ont suscité d’intenses négociations et trois propositions ont été rejetées avant l’adoption d’une quatrième version.

    À l’issue de la dernière soirée de réunion, le comité a ajouté la question de la proposition de traité en faveur des déficients visuels et d’autres propositions et contributions concernant les limitations et les exceptions à l’ordre du jour de la prochaine réunion du SCCR. La date de cette rencontre n’est pas encore arrêtée mais elle se tient habituellement en novembre. Une initiative lancée par le Secrétariat portant sur la sensibilisation des parties prenantes à la question des déficients visuels au travers d’une « plate-forme » reste également d’actualité.

    Les conclusions provisoires et définitives de la réunion du SCCR sont consultables sur www.ip-watch.org.

    Le Brésil, l’Équateur et le Paraguay, qui ont soumis la proposition au comité, ont « acheminé jusqu’à l’OMPI une demande légitime et urgente qui émane de la société civile », ont déclaré des membres de la délégation brésilienne à Intellectual Property Watch après la réunion.

    « C’est la première fois qu’une proposition de traité sur les exceptions et les limitations est portée à l’attention du SCCR », ont-ils expliqué. Cette proposition de traité, dont l’Union mondiale des aveugles (UMA) est à l’origine, « a bénéficié d’un soutien général. Les pays membres ont fait preuve d’ouverture et se sont montrés prêts à aborder le sujet », ont précisé les Brésiliens.

    « Cette réaction constitue un renversement vers ce que l’on aimerait qualifier de « nouveau paradigme », où les intérêts privés des titulaires de droits et les droits humains du public sont mis sur un pied d’égalité », a expliqué Flavio Arosemena, délégué national au droit d’auteur en Équateur, après la réunion. « L’OMPI vient de faire un pas en avant vers la prise en compte du système de propriété intellectuelle comme outil de développement et comme moyen de contribuer à l’amélioration de la vie de tous, pas seulement à celle des titulaires de droits ».

    Jukka Liedes, le président du comité, a fait savoir que la proposition de traité suivrait « la procédure habituelle » et que les délégations allaient se concerter au niveau national. La « machine » est lancée, a-t-il déclaré. « Au sein des organisations internationales, les propositions de traités sont chose habituelle », a-t-il ajouté, en précisant que « parfois, on peut aussi avoir affaire à des conventions ».

    Le comité a également fait preuve d’une « volonté nouvelle » de se pencher sur un traité de l’audiovisuel de l’OMPI discuté pour la dernière fois en 2000, a déclaré M. Liedes. Le comité a donc entendu les propositions de traité des parties prenantes (issues pour la majorité d’entre elles de l’industrie) sur les droits des organismes de radiodiffusion et a ajouté cette question au futur ordre du jour. Une réunion d’information d’une journée sur les droits des organismes de radiodiffusion a ouvert la rencontre qui s’est déroulée sur une semaine.

    Le texte final a été rédigé à huis clos pendant le dernier jour de la réunion, en présence de coordonnateurs régionaux et d’un ou deux délégués de chaque région. Les modifications clés apportées aux dernières conclusions provisoires ont consisté à inclure des références plus larges dans une approche « mondiale et universelle » des exceptions et limitations. Selon certaines sources, ces changements reflétaient les inquiétudes exprimées par le Groupe Afrique qui souhaitait voir le comité aborder clairement les questions liées aux bibliothèques et à l’enseignement.

    Le texte final décrit plus équitablement les opinions exprimées au cours de la semaine sur le traité en faveur des déficients visuels. Ainsi, certains participants étaient en faveur de la proposition d’un traité à caractère obligatoire ; certains souhaitaient disposer de plus de temps pour analyser cette solution ; d’autres désiraient poursuivre les travaux en les intégrant dans un cadre mondial et universel ; d’autres encore pensaient que des délibérations sur quelque outil que ce soit seraient « prématurées ».

    Le texte a dû être réécrit car, en milieu de semaine, plusieurs rapports avaient dénoncé le fait que la grande majorité des interventions sur le traité étaient fermement en sa faveur. La formulation finale n’a cependant pas engendré de contestations de la part des partisans.

    Certains observateurs ont fait remarquer que, dans le langage diplomatique, le terme « prématuré » se traduit en général par un mouvement d’opposition, un mouvement suivi en effet par le Groupe B des pays développés.

    Au cours de la semaine, les représentants des pays du Groupe B tels que les États-Unis et l’Allemagne (qui s’exprimait au nom du Groupe B) se sont montrés peu enclins à commenter la proposition de traité hors de la salle de réunion. Cette réaction, qui reflète peut-être leur position délicate, pourrait signifier que ces pays placent les intérêts économiques au-dessus des droits humains.

    La proposition finale insiste sur la manière dont la proposition de traité et toute autre proposition devra être appréhendée, en modifiant les expressions « sera étudiée » par « fera l’objet d’un débat ». Elle modifie de même l’idée de la plate-forme des parties prenantes afin de mettre en valeur l’intégration de pays en développement et de chercher à organiser sa prochaine rencontre dans un pays du Sud (les deux premières se sont tenues respectivement à Genève et Londres).

    Le texte final retient une formulation consensuelle pour exposer le processus lié au projet de questionnaire proposé par le Secrétariat, qui vise à déterminer l’état des limitations et des exceptions des États membres. Il précise également ce sur quoi le questionnaire devra se concentrer, des exceptions et limitations sociales, culturelles et religieuses aux transferts de technologie, en passant par les bibliothèques, l’enseignement et la recherche. Le texte inclura des questions à l’échelle transnationale.

    Le texte final accorde au Secrétariat un mandat prolongé pour achever d’ici à la prochaine réunion une étude portant sur les limitations et les exceptions dans le domaine de l’enseignement, en englobant l’enseignement à distance et les questions transnationales. Il a également été demandé au Secrétariat de préparer des documents d’analyse identifiant les « principales caractéristiques » des limitations et des exceptions en se basant sur toutes les études menées, en considérant le sujet à l’échelle internationale et en « présentant éventuellement une classification des principales solutions législatives ».

    Le retard pris le dernier jour est entre autres dû au débat qui a entouré la tenue d’une réunion d’information dans le cadre de la prochaine rencontre du SCCR. Selon des participants, certains membres souhaitaient une réunion centrée sur le traité en faveur des déficients visuels alors que d’autres désiraient mettre l’accent sur des limitations et des exceptions plus larges. Finalement, l’idée d’une réunion d’information a été abandonnée.

    Chris Friend, de l’UMA, l’organisation à l’origine de la proposition de traité en collaboration avec un groupe de rédaction formé d’experts qui se sont réunis à Washington en août 2008, a déclaré suite à la rencontre que les groupes tels que l’UMA ou le Consortium DAISY, qui travaillent en faveur des lecteurs déficients visuels, sont « intégrés à ce processus » et militent sur le terrain dans toutes les régions du monde. Selon ces derniers, les gouvernements seront « prêts à discuter » lorsqu’ils se présenteront à la prochaine rencontre du SCCR en novembre.

    Selon les partisans du traité, l’approche adoptée par les parties prenantes ne permet pas d’aborder l’ensemble des questions en rapport avec le grave manque de support imprimé ou électronique dédié aux lecteurs déficients visuels, particulièrement dans les pays en développement. Selon l’UMA, environ 90 % des déficients visuels vivent dans des pays aux revenus faibles ou modérés.

    L’organisation a expliqué au comité que 95 % des livres ne sont pas adaptés aux lecteurs aveugles ou malvoyants, qui ont recours aux solutions alternatives du format audio, du braille ou des gros caractères. La majorité des ouvrages au format adapté est produite par des organisations caritatives qui disposent de ressources limitées.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Fanny Mourguet

    William New may be reached at wnew@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     

    Comments

    1. L’OMPI se penche sur les exceptions au droit d’auteur (et pense aux bibliothèques) « :: S.I.Lex :: says:

      [...] un nouveau traité consacré aux exceptions et limitations au droit d’auteur (voir cette analyse sur le site Intellectual Property Watch). Il a visiblement été très difficile d’aboutir à un consensus sur cette proposition [...]

    2. Droits d’auteur (11/06/09) « pintiniblog says:

      [...] Droits d’auteur (11/06/09) – Avancées quant à la proposition de traité de l’OMPI sur les limitations et les exceptions au dr… [...]


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 107.22.45.61