SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Les membres de l’OMPI progressent sur la mise en application du Plan d’action pour le développement

    Published on 12 May 2009 @ 2:35 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    En avril dernier, les membres de l’Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle (OMPI) ont entrepris des négociations complexes dans le but d’approuver un nouveau plan de mise en application des recommandations visant à accroître les efforts de l’OMPI en faveur du développement, comme l’ont déclaré des participants.

    Le Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle (CDPI) de l’OMPI s’est réuni du 27 avril au 1er mai.

    Face aux inquiétudes exprimées par certains pays en développement quant aux procédures trop longues, les membres ont naturellement décidé de suivre une démarche thématique flexible concernant les 45 recommandations du Plan d’action pour le développement approuvées lors de l’Assemblée générale de 2007. Selon certaines sources, les recommandations ont été abordées sous différents thèmes, ce qui a permis de simplifier l’action du secrétariat de l’OMPI chargé de prévoir le financement de ces recommandations dans sa proposition de budget pour l’année 2010-2011.

    Les gouvernements se sont également penchés sur la manière de coordonner et d’établir des rapports sur la mise en application des recommandations. Ce sujet pourrait ouvrir la voie à un débat politique. Selon des participants à la réunion, les pays développés ont insisté sur le fait que l’OMPI ne mettrait pas en place de nouveaux mécanismes. Les groupes des pays en développement ont, quant à eux, fait part de suggestions sur la manière dont pourrait s’organiser l’établissement de rapports par les responsables du comité de l’OMPI.

    Trevor Clarke, président du comité et ambassadeur de la Barbade, a déclaré qu’il allait proposer des consultations informelles et non contraignantes au cours de la période qui précèdera l’Assemblée générale de septembre.

    Des sources ont indiqué que les propositions thématiques allaient être reformulées en intégrant les commentaires soumis au cours de la semaine, avant d’être débattues une nouvelle fois lors de la prochaine rencontre du CDPI programmée au mois de novembre.

    « Le processus est lancé, il n’y a plus de doute », a déclaré un représentant du Brésil, un des pays qui ont participé à la création du Plan d’action pour le développement de l’OMPI en 2004. « Nous avons pris la décision de donner une chance à l’approche thématique. Le président s’est montré déterminé quant à l’adoption d’une approche pondérée ».

    Les garanties fondamentales dans le cadre d’une approche thématique portaient sur la priorité des recommandations individuelles par rapport aux thèmes, sur la possibilité d’évolution et de modification des projets au cours du processus et sur la flexibilité de la procédure, comme l’a expliqué le représentant brésilien à Intellectual Property Watch.

    Questionné après la rencontre, M. Clarke a déclaré que l’accord principal concernait l’organisation de la mise en application des recommandations adoptées au travers de l’approche thématique. Selon lui, un tel accord s’avère utile car des compromis élaborés pour appliquer les 45 recommandations pouvaient faire apparaître des cas de double emploi.

    L’approche thématique vise à rassembler les projets ou des parties de projets présentant des activités similaires et à les mettre en application, a fait savoir M. Clarke. L’approche « permettra d’accélérer la mise en application et de la rendre plus efficace », a-t-il ajouté.

    Trois des thèmes abordés au cours de la semaine correspondaient à des recommandations portant sur : la concurrence ; le domaine public ; les technologies de l’information et de la communication et la fracture numérique. Les autres thèmes incluent le transfert de technologie et l’information en matière de brevets. Les détails des projets sont exposés dans les documents de travail de la réunion disponibles sur le site Internet de l’OMPI.

    Les propositions de projet détaillées du secrétariat entrant dans le cadre de ces thèmes comprenaient la mise en œuvre de nombreuses études et d’autres initiatives. Elles présentaient également des estimations de budget et de délais. Ces propositions ont été modifiées afin de refléter les exigences des recommandations, a expliqué M. Clarke.

    Les États-Unis en faveur d’un accès limité et d’une transparence restreinte

    Les États-Unis se sont montrés réticents en ce qui concerne la recommandation 19, qui préconise de tenir des débats sur l’amélioration de l’accès à la connaissance et à la technologie pour les pays en développement. Selon eux, les modifications proposées sont considérables et nécessitent d’être expliquées plus en détails. Les États-Unis ont également explicité leurs commentaires sur le rapport du CDPI en date de juillet 2008 dans lesquels ils souhaitaient limiter les informations concernant l’assistance technique offerte par l’OMPI.

    Concernant la réunion prévue par la recommandation 6, l’OMPI a préparé une liste de consultants auxquels elle avait eu recours entre 2005 et 2008 pour des sujets portant sur le développement. Parmi les noms cités, on retrouve des personnes issues du milieu des affaires, des universitaires et des juristes. La publication de cette liste est un signe d’une plus grande transparence, même si les détails concernant les personnes en charge de l’assistance technique restent rares.

    Les recommandations 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 19, 24 et 27 ont été abordées au cours de la semaine, en plus des activités liées aux recommandations qui avaient été approuvées au cours de la dernière session du CDPI, en juillet 2008.

    Les propositions de projets vont maintenant être présentées au Comité du programme et budget, qui se réunira du 17 au 19 juin.

    Pendant cette semaine, le secrétariat a publié un article portant sur les conditions d’une approche thématique. L’article fait savoir que les recommandations originales seront conservées en l’état avec les modifications apportées par les membres et resteront ouvertes même si un projet se termine, que des projets supplémentaires peuvent être mis au point, que les ressources financières nécessaires seront rendues disponibles, que des activités seront nécessaires à certaines principes, qu’il est possible de réviser un projet et enfin que les recommandations individuelles peuvent être inclues dans plus d’un projet.

    Le secrétariat a également fait savoir qu’une conférence portant sur la mobilisation des ressources pour le développement est prévue du 5 au 9 novembre à Genève. Le document annonçant la conférence est disponible sur www.ip-watch.org.

    Coordination et évaluation

    Un débat clé sur les mécanismes de coordination, d’évaluation et d’établissement de rapports de travail s’est tenu en fin de semaine.

    Le Pakistan, avec le soutien des membres du groupe Asie, a proposé que les responsables des comités de l’OMPI présentent un rapport à l’Assemblée générale de l’organisation exposant la manière dont leur comité a mis en application les recommandations du Plan d’action pour le développement. La proposition du Pakistan appelle l’Assemblée générale de septembre à « enseigner à tous les comités de l’OMPI comment intégrer chacune des recommandations du Plan d’action pour le développement dans leur travail ».

    Le Pakistan demande également que le directeur général de l’OMPI fasse des remarques préliminaires lors de l’Assemblée générale et des réunions des comités de l’OMPI sur les brevets, le droit d’auteur et les droits connexes, les ressources génétiques, les savoirs traditionnels et le folklore, le programme et le budget, les marques de commerce et la mise en application.

    Le directeur général de l’OMPI, Francis Gurry, s’est adressé au CDPI en réaffirmant son engagement en faveur du Plan d’action pour le développement. Il a déclaré que la coordination du secrétariat dépendrait de la Division de coordination du Plan d’action pour le développement, qui lui présente directement des rapports.

    Le secrétariat a expliqué avoir élaboré la nouvelle méthodologie après que des membres lui aient fait part de leur préoccupation quant aux recommandations qui pourraient se chevaucher les unes les autres, ne contiennent pas assez de données financières détaillées ou ne sont pas mises en place assez rapidement. Les ressources nécessaires autres que celles liées au personnel des projets présentés par l’OMPI représentent 3,99 millions de Francs suisses. Les ressources en personnel s’élèvent, quant à elles, à 2,82 millions de Francs suisses.

    Tout au long de la semaine, des organisations non gouvernementales étaient présentes et prêtes à commenter les questions débattues. Certaines d’entre elles ont distribué leurs communiqués pendant la rencontre, en espérant les voir inclus dans le compte rendu de la réunion. Parmi elles se trouvaient la Free Software Foundation Europe, et plusieurs groupes internationaux de bibliothécaires.

    Des événements se sont tenus parallèlement à la réunion pendant toute la semaine. L’un d’eux, organisé par le Centre Sud, se concentrait sur la recommandation 22 du Plan d’action pour le développement, qui fournit une liste de questions devant être prises en compte par l’OMPI durant le processus d’établissement de nouvelles normes dans le but de participer aux objectifs du Millénaire pour le développement des Nations Unies.

    La prochaine rencontre du CDPI est prévue du 16 au 20 novembre.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Fanny Mourguet

    William New may be reached at wnew@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.167.242.224