SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • The EU or the US are not the banana states for whi... »
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Equipo especial de alto nivel sobre derechos humanos dirige su atención hacia la salud y la propiedad intelectual

    Published on 8 April 2009 @ 1:18 pm

    By and for Intellectual Property Watch

    Según un nuevo documento elaborado para el Grupo de Trabajo sobre el Derecho al Desarrollo de Naciones Unidas, la estrategia mundial sobre salud y propiedad intelectual de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) comprende elementos sólidos y posibles cambios paradigmáticos; sin embargo, también presenta lagunas considerables en cuanto a derechos humanos.

    Al Grupo de Trabajo sobre el Derecho al Desarrollo, que forma parte de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos (OACDH), se le ha conferido el mandato de evaluar asociaciones para el desarrollo, tales como la estrategia mundial o el Programa para el Desarrollo de la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual (OMPI), en el marco de los derechos humanos.

    Dicho documento (en inglés) se analizará en una reunión del equipo especial de alto nivel sobre el ejercicio del derecho al desarrollo, que proporciona conocimientos técnicos independientes al Grupo de Trabajo y cuya reunión se celebrará del 2 al 9 de abril en Ginebra.

    Según se desprende del documento, la estrategia mundial hace hincapié en la importancia del uso exhaustivo de las flexibilidades previstas en el Acuerdo sobre los Aspectos de los Derechos de la Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio (ADPIC) de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) con fines de salud pública, y destaca la necesidad de innovar en materia de enfermedades desatendidas, por ejemplo, mediante una “iniciativa prometedora” de un grupo de expertos que trabajen en la financiación de tal innovación.

    No obstante, se señala en el informe, la estrategia se ve debilitada por su incapacidad de advertir específicamente sobre la aplicación de las medidas “ADPIC plus” (que trascienden los compromisos contraídos en el marco del Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC) en acuerdos comerciales bilaterales que podrían impedir la consecución del derecho a la salud. Asimismo, presenta lagunas con respecto a la obligación de los Estados miembros de promover mecanismos de financiación sostenibles al recomendar únicamente que se utilicen los mecanismos de financiación existentes, en vez de sugerir caminos hacia medidas adicionales, y al centrarse solamente en las asociaciones entre el sector público y el sector privado a la hora de detallar las estrategias existentes, en vez de explorar diferentes métodos de financiación.

    La estrategia mundial y plan de acción sobre salud pública, innovación y propiedad intelectual de la OMS se aprobó en mayo de 2008 y establece el plan de dicho organismo para abordar las desigualdades en el acceso a los productos médicos y la innovación de la salud según se relaciona con el sistema de propiedad intelectual.

    El plan de trabajo para 2008-2010 del Grupo de Trabajo sobre el Derecho al Desarrollo abarca el mandato de evaluar las asociaciones mundiales en función de sus efectos en el acceso a los medicamentos esenciales y en la transferencia de tecnología. En este respecto, en el nuevo documento, elaborado por una experta independiente de Naciones Unidas, se evalúa la estrategia mundial de la OMS, y el proceso del Grupo de Trabajo Intergubernamental sobre Salud Pública, Innovación y Propiedad Intelectual (IGWG) que condujo a su origen, sobre la base del derecho a la salud, que incluye el acceso a los medicamentos, y el derecho a disfrutar de los beneficios de los avances científicos.

    La autora de dicho documento es la investigadora posdoctoral Lisa Forman, especialista en derechos humanos y salud pública del Munk Centre for International Studies de la Universidad de Toronto.

    El proceso de evaluación de los derechos humanos

    La OACDH es el organismo de Naciones Unidas encargado de identificar y denunciar las violaciones de los derechos humanos. El Grupo de Trabajo sobre el Derecho al Desarrollo se estableció en 1998 con el fin de “fiscalizar y examinar los progresos realizados en la promoción y el ejercicio” de los derechos descritos en la Declaración sobre el derecho al desarrollo de las Naciones Unidas de 1986 (en inglés).

    Esto lo realiza a través de un conjunto de criterios que se detallan en el segundo apéndice de este documento [pdf en inglés].

    El equipo especial de alto nivel sobre el ejercicio del derecho al desarrollo está compuesto de cinco expertos independientes: el Presidente Stephen Marks de la Escuela de Salud Pública de la Universidad de Harvard (Estados Unidos), Nico Schrijver del Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies de la Universidad de Leiden (Países Bajos), Sakiko Fukuda-Parr de la New School (Estados Unidos), Raymond Atuguba de la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Ghana y Flavia Piovesan de la Facultad de Derecho de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de São Paulo (Brasil).

    El proceso del IGWG desde la perspectiva de los derechos humanos

    Para que un proceso pueda garantizar de manera adecuada el derecho al desarrollo, debe incluir necesariamente la participación efectiva de las partes interesadas claves en pos de la consecución de dicho derecho. De acuerdo con el informe de Forman, la participación está “estrechamente relacionada con la observancia de los demás principios que subyacen en el derecho al desarrollo, entre ellos, la no discriminación, la transparencia y la rendición de cuentas”.

    En el informe se reconoce que tanto la participación de varios grupos de la sociedad civil internacional como el uso de audiencias y consultas al público a través de Internet son fundamentales a la hora de lograr una participación efectiva. Sin embargo, se observa una escasez de grupos nacionales de la sociedad civil y se cuestiona si el formato basado en Internet, en el que los documentos deben presentarse en inglés, genera una participación genuina. El tamaño de las delegaciones, generalmente menor en los países desarrollados, también afectó la plena participación en las sesiones del grupo de trabajo que formaron parte del proceso.

    La delegación de tareas y la rendición de cuentas presentan algunas deficiencias en la estrategia mundial, dado que los actores principales son los “gobiernos” (sin especificaciones precisas respecto de responsabilidades diferenciadas entre países desarrollados y países en desarrollo), y diversos términos del texto, tales como “solicitar”, “invitar” e “instar”, atenúan el llamamiento para la adopción de medidas particulares. Por otra parte, los indicadores de éxito no establecen objetivos definidos y, si bien tienen la capacidad de contar la cantidad de medidas adoptadas en nombre de la salud pública, no pueden medir el impacto de tales medidas.

    Asimismo, en el informe se afirma que “en particular, no existen indicadores que midan la fabricación de nuevos medicamentos o la proporción de la población que tiene acceso a los medicamentos existentes”, un “déficit significativo” en una estrategia cuyo fin es precisamente ese.

    Los criterios del derecho al desarrollo podrían ampliar el IGWG y la estrategia mundial, la cual tal vez aborda los derechos de manera implícita, pero no contiene un reconocimiento explícito de tales derechos. La sugerencia que se indica en el informe es llevar a cabo varias revisiones de los principios del derecho al desarrollo con la inclusión de elementos que exijan: la evaluación de las medidas ADPIC plus y su impacto en la salud, la garantía de que el acceso a los medicamentos esenciales se brinde de conformidad con el derecho a la salud, y el requisito de que las compañías farmacéuticas integren los derechos humanos en sus estrategias comerciales.

    Se ha planificado para un futuro cercano una revisión del Programa de la OMPI para el Desarrollo en materia de derechos humanos.

    Traducido del inglés por Fernanda Nieto Femenia

    Kaitlin Mara may be reached at kmara@ip-watch.ch.

    James Leonard may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.235.36.164