SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »
  • If this goes ahead, as the EU will "speak" for all... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    EE.UU.: tribunal hace valer las licencias de código abierto; gran impacto en las leyes sobre derechos de autor

    Published on 29 August 2008 @ 2:07 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Steven Seidenberg para Intellectual Property Watch
    El fallo no tiene valor de precedente. No obstante, la reciente decisión del caso Jacobsen v. Katzer (en inglés) tendrá un gran impacto en las leyes estadounidenses sobre derechos de autor, según expertos en propiedad intelectual (PI).

    Jacobsen sostuvo que se puede asegurar el cumplimiento de las licencias de código abierto en virtud de las leyes sobre derechos de autor de Estados Unidos. “Es la primera vez que un tribunal de apelación estadounidense trata directamente asuntos sobre la fuerza ejecutiva de las licencias de código abierto”, comentó Jim Thatcher, abogado de las oficinas de Woodcock Washburn en Seattle. “Ya que los tribunales [estadounidenses] no encontrarán guía alguna sobre este asunto, se referirán a este caso y a su lógica para que hacer valer las condiciones de las licencias de código abierto”.

    “[…] Créanme, esto es trascendental”, escribió Lawrence Lessig, experto en derechos de autor en la Facultad de Derecho de Stanford, en su blog en línea.

    Las licencias de código abierto permiten a toda persona utilizar (y modificar) libremente las obras a condición de que el usuario respete las condiciones de licencia. Una de las típicas condiciones de licencia especifica que cualquiera que utilice o modifique la obra debe indicar claramente el nombre original y el autor de ésta. Otra condición habitual especifica que si un usuario modificara la obra, la misma licencia de código abierto protege el producto resultante.

    Las licencias de código abierto existen desde hace años y son muy utilizadas. El software de servidor web más conocido en el mundo, Apache, está protegido por una licencia de código abierto. Éste es también el caso del navegador Firefox, del sistema operativo Linux, del lenguaje de programación Perl y del contenido de Wikipedia, por nombrar sólo algunos. Además, existen aproximadamente 100 millones de obras cuyos derechos se han cedido mediante varias licencias de Creative Commons, incluido este artículo.

    Sin embargo, pese a que las obras de código abierto juegan un papel clave en Internet, en la industria de la tecnología de la información así como también en muchos otros sectores, no se sabía con certeza si los tribunales de Estados Unidos harían respetar las licencias de código abierto. Actualmente, Jacobsen ha disipado bastante esa incertidumbre.

    “Durante mucho, mucho tiempo, hemos estado esperando que se pronuncie un fallo sobre las licencias de código abierto”, comentó Stuart Meyer, un socio de las oficinas de Fenwick & West en Mountain View, California. “Este suceso permite ver con más claridad la manera en la que la ley estadounidense considerará estas licencias no tradicionales”.

    Orígenes humildes

    El caso Jacobsen surgió de inicios humildes. A partir de trenes de juguete, para ser exacto.

    Robert Jacobsen dirige un grupo de creadores de código abierto que, gracias a los esfuerzos de varios participantes, desarrolló un software que permite a los aficionados al modelismo de ferrocarriles programar chips decodificadores que controlan las maquetas de trenes. Este software, DecoderPro, puede utilizarse, modificarse y distribuirse gratuitamente mediante un tipo de licencia de código abierto poco utilizado: la Licencia Artística.

    Matthew Katzer vende un software de competencia que tiene incorporado una versión modificada del código de DecoderPro. Pero el producto de Katzer no cumple con lo dispuesto en las condiciones de la Licencia Artística. Entre otros, el producto de Katzer no indica que una parte del código se copió de DecoderPro, no da crédito a los autores del código DecoderPro y no menciona el proyecto de código abierto que creó DecoderPro.

    Jacobsen entabló un juicio por violación a los derechos de autor y solicitó una cesación previa. Un tribunal de distrito federal en California denegó la cesación al decidir que las condiciones de la licencia de código abierto no se aplicaban en el marco de las leyes sobre derechos de autor.

    Jacobsen interpuso recurso de apelación y el Tribunal de Apelación del Circuito Federal (generalmente conocida como el “tribunal de PI” del país) revocó el fallo. El 13 de agosto, el tribunal compuesto por tres jueces sostuvo de manera unánime que las condiciones de la licencia de código abierto eran claras. La licencia cede a los usuarios el derecho de copiar, modificar y distribuir libremente el software “a condición de que” éstos respeten ciertas condiciones específicas. Al no respetar dichas condiciones, Katzer no estaba autorizado a utilizar el software registrado como propiedad intelectual. Por ese motivo, el uso no autorizado del software por parte de Katzer pudo ser considerado como una violación de los derechos de autor.

    Técnicamente, el fallo del Circuito Federal no tendrá efecto de precedente. Debido a una extraña peculiaridad de las leyes estadounidenses, el tribunal tuvo que aplicar las normas jurídicas de un tribunal de apelación hermano, el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones del Noveno Circuito; y la interpretación del Circuito Federal de las leyes del Noveno Circuito no tiene valor de precedente. Según Harold Wegner, un socio de las oficinas de Foley & Lardner en Washington D.C., “aún así, un futuro caso del Circuito Federal en este ámbito del derecho deberá basarse nuevamente en las normas jurídicas del [noveno] circuito y no en la interpretación del Circuito Federal”.

    Un caso de gran impacto

    No obstante, varios expertos en los derechos de autor de Estados Unidos creen que el fallo del caso Jacobsen tendrá un gran impacto en derecho (y no sólo porque ésta es la única decisión de un tribunal de apelación estadounidense sobre este tema). “El razonamiento utilizado en este caso será muy persuasivo para los tribunales en el futuro”, comentó Chris Ridder, administrador en el Centro de Internet y Sociedad de la Facultad de Derecho de Stanford. (en este caso, Ridder representó a Creative Commons Corporation, que presentó un escrito amicus curiae en nombre de Jacobsen).

    “Para poder tomar una decisión diferente, los próximos tribunales se verían obligados a distinguir los hechos”, aseguró Jeffrey Neuburger, un socio de las oficinas de Proskauer Rose en Manhattan.

    Se espera que el fallo Jacobsen tenga importancia adicional puesto que fue emitido por un tribunal especializado en PI y asuntos de alta tecnología. “La decisión tiene el peso del Circuito Federal, que por lo general falla en casos de asuntos de tecnología”, dijo Meyer.

    Un aspecto clave sobre el cual el tribunal decidió fue que las condiciones de la licencia de código abierto creaban condiciones para obtener la licencia. Dichas condiciones no eran simples compromisos independientes de la licencia, en cuyo caso únicamente podrían hacerse cumplir con arreglo al derecho contractual.

    Esta distinción es vital dado que es mucho más fácil hacer respetar las condiciones de la licencia con arreglo a las leyes sobre derechos de autor que en virtud del derecho contractual. En Estados Unidos los demandantes pueden obtener indemnizaciones por daños y perjuicios establecidos por ley por violación de los derechos de autor, pero deben probar estos daños y perjuicios por incumplimiento de contrato. Asimismo, por lo general los demandantes obtienen cesaciones de la infracción, pero rara vez pueden obtener la acción de cesación para cesar el incumplimiento de contrato.

    Si el titular de una licencia de código abierto se basara en el derecho contractual, es posible que no obtenga ningún recurso contra los que no cumplieron con las condiciones de la licencia. Sería muy difícil obtener una acción de cesación así como probar los daños y perjuicios, en particular si el titular de la licencia da la obra gratuitamente (como sucede con la mayoría de las obras de código abierto). El Circuito Federal advirtió este problema: “[…] Dado que la apreciación de los daños y perjuicios es intrínsecamente especulativa, estos tipos de restricciones de la licencia podrían ser considerados sin efecto y podría ser imposible exigir su cumplimiento mediante desagravio por mandato judicial”.

    Según varios expertos en los derechos de autor de Estados Unidos, al permitir la aplicación en conformidad con las leyes sobre derechos de autor, el tribunal impulsó de manera notable al movimiento de código abierto. “Confirma las expectativas que tienen millones de cedentes de licencias [de código abierto]… de que se trata de una manera legítima y práctica de proteger las obras registradas como propiedad intelectual”, comentó Ridder.

    Según Meyer, “la decisión legitima estas licencias. No se les da un estatus de segunda clase por el hecho de que sean obras dedicadas al público”.

    Se espera que el fallo fomente el crecimiento del movimiento de código abierto en Estados Unidos e incite a los cedentes de licencias de código abierto a perseguir a aquellos que no respetan las condiciones de licencia.

    “Puesto que ahora existe un precedente, hacer valer los derechos contemplados en las licencias de código abierto resultará más fácil para los demás”, comentó Meyer y añadió que “es probable que aumente la cantidad de litigios para forzar el cumplimiento de las licencias de código abierto”.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 180.183.30.49