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IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

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2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


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    Agreement Reached On IP And Public Health Resolution At WHO

    Published on 27 May 2006 @ 12:41 am

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    A technical group at the World Health Assembly today agreed on a resolution that will increase the worldwide research and development focus on diseases that disproportionately affect developing countries. Brazil and Kenya, which have been driving the issue, welcomed the resolution, which is expected to be adopted tomorrow, 27 May.

    The text of the resolution is not yet available but will be distributed at the meeting on 27 May by the World Health Organization (WHO), the chair of the group, Gaudenz Silberschmidt of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, told Intellectual Property Watch.

    He said it is “a text without a single square bracket,” leading him to conclude that, “we got the results.” He declined to comment further on the content.

    The original resolution draft was presented on 25 May by the chair and merges two key IP resolutions that have been forwarded to the Health Assembly: One a proposal by Brazil and Kenya for a global framework on essential health research and development (EB117 R13) and another resolution based on a report published by a WHO Commission on Intellectual Property, Innovation and Public Health (CIPIH) (IPW, Public Health, 3 April 2006). That resolution would have established a working group to develop a global strategy and plan of action.

    The revised draft resolution from 26 May called for the establishment of an “intergovernmental working group open to all interested members states to develop a global strategy and plan of action to provide a medium-term framework [to implement/based on] the recommendations of the [CIPIH] commission [taking into consideration WHO’s comparative advantage].”

    Some have questioned the need for references to both a strategy and a plan. But others said that a strategy is needed in order to develop a plan.

    “It’s very good, we are very happy,” a Brazilian official said, adding that the resolution focuses on research and development. One issue that had been debated was whether it should refer to diseases in general, neglected diseases or something broader such as “health problems,” which was in discussion earlier in the day, sources said.

    But the Brazilian official said they had settled for “diseases that disproportionately affect developing countries,” which reflects the CIPIH report.

    Another contentious issue in the draft resolution were references to flexibilities as stated in the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). In the revised draft resolution from 26 May, member states are urged to, “[encourage that bilateral trade agreements take into account the flexibilities contained in the WTO TRIPS Agreement and recognized by the Doha Ministerial Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health.]”

    Some participants said that on the request of the European Commission the word “bilateral” had been dropped in the agreed-to text.

    A Kenyan official told Intellectual Property Watch that the resolution is “a good beginning for a lot of work that is going to come in the future.” He welcomed the fact that with the resolution they have managed to draw attention to the health problems in developing countries.

    The official said that the United States had taken most issue with reference to patents and intellectual property rights in general in the draft, but all of the references to TRIPS that were in the 26 May draft appear to be still in the final version. “Not a single paragraph has been deleted,” the Kenyan official said.

    An official from a developed country said that there had been a good spirit among the negotiators and that the Brazilians had even referred to the language in the draft resolution as “beautiful wording.”

    Commenting on the resolution some hours before it was agreed to, Matti Rajala of the European Commission Health and Consumer Protection Directorate told Intellectual Property Watch that as always the resolution was likely to be a compromise and he was sure there would be some non-governmental organisations that would be “extremely disappointed.” He also believed it was a good idea not to mention “neglected diseases” as there is no document defining what constitutes a neglected disease.

    What’s In and What’s out

    The proposed draft resolution that the chair drafted on 25 May contained an annex with language from the respective resolutions that was taken out when they were combined. The annex did not appear in the 26 May version.

    Participants said some language was removed due to overlaps from combining the two draft resolutions. A comparison of the resolutions shows duplicate references to the setting up of an intergovernmental committee, and the link between intellectual property, high prices and access. There also was some overlap in references to TRIPS flexibilities, although the 26 May draft focused on preserving these flexibilities in bilateral trade deals and not in general as some of the deleted language did.

    Deleted language with no apparent overlap may have been removed because it was controversial. This might include language “recognising the importance of making global health and medicines a strategic sector;” and references to open access to public research such as the Human Genome Project and open access models in general. It might also include references to the public domain (“proper balance between intellectual property rights and the public domain”), and to the public interest (“imperative to reconcile the public interest in accessing the products and derived from new knowledge with the public interest in stimulating invention”), a global appeal from 2,500 scientists, and the importance of the WHO’s regional committees to include the CIPIH report in their agendas.

    Trade and Health Resolution Stumbles

    Followers of intellectual property-related issues at the assembly listened diligently through the delayed agenda today waiting for the discussion of another IP resolution: International trade and health (EB117 R5).

    This resolution suggests that there should be greater collaboration and correlation between trade and health ministers and their respective work at the national level.

    This resolution was unanimously adopted at the WHO Executive Board meeting in January and a number of delegations, including many developing countries, voiced their support for the resolution today as well. There were, however a few suggestions to add new language and as the United States said it did not have the mandate to agree on the suggestions without consulting its capital, the secretariat said that a new document incorporating the changes would be distributed on 27 May.

    Among the changes was a proposal from Turkey to include language on “taking special problems of transition countries into consideration.” Venezuela and India also suggested changes. One suggested change was to create an intergovernmental group for trade and health, sources said.

    The US supported the resolution but said that the WHO should advise member states on trade in an “unbiased and evidence-based” manner, and clear it with the WTO and the World Intellectual Property Organization.

    There were also some heated exchanges between Cuba and the United States, with Cuba blaming the United States’ trade embargo for health problems such as lack of access to medicines in Cuba. The US representative took issue with the “outrageous attack” made by Cuba, calling them unfortunate and saying that the claims had nothing to do with the debate on public health and were “totally, totally unacceptable by my government.”

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
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