UK To Introduce Webmarking For Registered Designs

With strong backing from interested parties in the intellectual property community, the United Kingdom government plans to introduce legislation to give registered UK or European Community design holders the option to mark their products with the address of a website that links to the relevant registered design numbers, it said today.

Algeria Joins Madrid Protocol, Triggers Easing Of Global Registration Of Marks

Trademark

Trademark applicants should soon be able to make better use of the Madrid system for the registration of international trademarks, the World Intellectual Property Organization has announced. Algeria became the last country to join a protocol to the international trademark system, which will allow the protocol to rule the international registration procedures, making it easier for applicants to get global protection.

IP Experts Kick Off UC Berkeley Innovation Centre With Calls For Change

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BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA — “There’s only one thing we’re good at in this nation, and that’s innovation,” Tusher Center Director and Professor David Teece said recently in setting the tone for a day of discussions inspired by the launch of the new center at the University of California at Berkeley.

NGOs Call Out Switzerland For Pressuring Colombia On Compulsory Licences; Switzerland Replies

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Civil society groups are calling on the Swiss government to refrain from putting pressure on developing countries wishing to manufacture generic medicines without the consent of the patent holder. The groups allege that the Swiss government tried to unduly influence Colombia to not take such a step, though it is permitted by international trade rules.

The Swiss government, for its part, says it participated in a public consultation in Colombia and merely underlined that negotiations between governments and original manufacturers are a better way to go than a compulsory licence.

Australian Review Of IPR, Competition Balance Draws Mixed Academic Response

Australian Productivity Commission

A government-ordered review of Australia’s intellectual property arrangements could either resolve many important and long-standing issues or prove to be yet another political exercise in futility, academics say.

WIPO Director Gurry Highlights Value Of Indigenous Knowledge

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Indigenous Peoples’ knowledge and creativity is a valuable source of inspiration for all, but might benefit from being better protected, the head of the UN World Intellectual Property Organization said this month. WIPO is currently negotiating an international instrument or instruments to better protect genetic resources, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions (folklore).

The Intersection Of Trade Secret Law And Social Media Privacy Legislation

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By Eric F. Barton, Esq., Seyfarth Shaw LLP There is no question that social media privacy issues now permeate the workplace. In an attempt to provide further guidance and regulation in this area, since April 2012, a growing number of state legislatures in the United States have passed various forms of social media privacy legislation. […]

For Ministerial, Developing Countries Seek Moratorium On TRIPS Non-Violation Complaints

WTO

The ability for a member of the World Trade Organization to challenge another member for deprivation of benefits even though this member has not violated any given WTO agreement does not presently apply to intellectual property.

For years, the issue has been debated in the WTO intellectual property committee, with no conclusive outcome. Last month, a group of 17 developing countries submitted a draft decision for the upcoming WTO ministerial conference in December to lastingly ban intellectual property-related non-violation complaints, stepping ahead of the next meeting of the WTO IP committee to be held in October.

Trade Secrets: The ‘Reasonable Steps’ Requirement

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Trade secret theft is a top risk for companies today. When the worst does happen and trade secrets are compromised, companies must prove that reasonable steps have been taken to protect a company’s crown jewels. But determining what “reasonable steps” are can be challenging. Governments have been vague about the term’s definition; and laws and legislation continue to evolve on this issue. However, court actions do provide insight on the ‘reasonable steps requirement’ and point to the need for companies to embed trade secret protection into business operations to qualify as legal protection, writes Pamela Passman.

Ecuador, BRICS Moving Away From International Investment Dispute Regime, Paper Says

Global Justice

As part of a series of publications on investment treaties and investor-state dispute settlement, a developing country multilateral organisation released a policy brief focusing on Ecuador’s experience and action against the current dispute settlement system.