Thailand Toughens Copyright Law To Deal With Internet Providers, Unlawful Movie Recording In Theaters

Thai Copyright Act booklet Mar 2015

BANGKOK – Thailand has toughened its copyright law to include, for the first time, responsibility of intermediaries, or internet service providers, for infringement of copyright work on the internet, and separately, to penalise people who record movies being shown in theatres without authorisation with a maximum imprisonment of four years.

Manila Principles On Intermediary Liability Offer Vision For Balance

Manila Principles

A new set of principles launched this week by a range of global non-governmental organisations attempts to set out guidelines for internet intermediaries’ liability for content of communications. The six principles, which are seeking endorsement from organisations and individuals worldwide, address freedom of expression, freedom of association, and the right to privacy.

IP Industry Issues Report On Intermediaries’ Role In Fighting IP Infringement In Supply Chain

supply chain

A leading business group has published a report that it says shows how intermediaries can help keep fake and pirated products out of the supply chain and off the internet. The International Chamber of Commerce BASCAP (Business Action to Stop Counterfeiting and Piracy) released the 120-page report on 26 March. The paper is titled “Roles […]

How The Leaked TPP ISDS Chapter Threatens Intellectual Property Limitations and Exceptions

sean flynn

By Prof. Sean Flynn, Associate Director, Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property (PIJIP), American University Washington College of Law Reposted with permission from Infojustice.org, original here. I released a statement earlier today opining that the today’s leak of the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) chapter proposed for the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement (available […]

UN Human Rights Council Approves Expert On Privacy In The Digital Age

OHCHR-logo

The UN Human Rights Council at its 28th session today in Geneva adopted a resolution that establishes a new mandate for a Special Rapporteur on Privacy in the Digital Age. The Council also approved a resolution extending the mandate of the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights for 3 years, and took note of the current rapporteur’s recent report raising concerns about the impact of copyright on human rights.

TPP’s Copyright Term Benefits US, Burdens Others

US flag flies over world 2 by Svilen Milev

The US got its way. The Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement (TPP) will require all member nations to have a minimum copyright term of life plus 70 years. As a result, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, and three other nations will have to increase the duration of copyright by 20 years. This copyright term extension will benefit powerful interests in the US, but will hurt consumers and creators in six other nations that are part of the TPP.

CJEU Renders Landmark Decision On Private Copying Levies

Image converted using ifftoany

From Hogan Lovells: Private copying levies in the Member States have occupied the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) quite a few times, previously for example in decision C‑521/11 from 2013. With the current decision in Nokia vs. Copydan Båndkopi (C‑463/12), the CJEU answers some of the most discussed questions surrounding copyright levies […]

UN Human Rights Council Debates Report Criticising Copyright

HRC

Copyright might run counter to human rights, says a new report from the United Nations Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights. In the report, she provides a number of recommendations, including encouraging UN World Intellectual Property Organization members to support the adoption of international instruments on limitations and exceptions to copyright. The report is under consideration by the Human Rights Council and was debated extensively today.

No, Democracy is Not Excess Baggage

democracy image

There was quite some controversy at the 3-4 March 2015 UNESCO Connecting the Dots Conference regarding whether or not the term “democracy” should be included in the conference’s outcome statement to make it clear that internet governance must be democratic.

European Commission Urged To Fix EU Law Before Addressing IPR Protections In Third Countries

European Commission image

Efforts to revamp protection for and enforcement of intellectual property rights in non-EU countries are welcome, but the European Commission should get Europe’s IPR house in order first, a new draft report by the European Parliament International Trade (INTA) Committee says. Meanwhile, internal IPR reform is advancing on several fronts, said the EC, which gave Intellectual Property Watch an update on the various measures.