WHO Negotiations To Continue On Non-State Actors

World_Health_Organisation_building_from_west

Third World Network reports: New Delhi, 20 July (K M Gopakumar) – Member States of the World Health Organization have decided to continue the negotiations on a Framework of Engagement with Non-State Actors (FENSA) as several key issues remain unresolved.

Learning From Ebola

15_square_ebola

In 1976, Yambuku village school headmaster Mabalo Lokela felt sick when he returned from a trip to northern Zaire near the Central African Republic border. He had a high fever, diarrhea, and bleeding. Because he was initially believed to have malaria, Lokela was given quinine, but his symptoms got worse and he soon died. Shortly afterwards, those who had been in contact with Lokela also died. … Almost four decades later, there is still no cure for Ebola, despite the fact that drug development on average takes about a third of this time frame, write William Fisher and Quentin Palfrey.

New ARIPO Plant Protocol: Conflict Of Farmers’ And Breeders’ Rights?

Africa agric

KAMPALA, UGANDA — Member states of African Regional Intellectual Property Organization (ARIPO) have adopted a protocol for the protection of new varieties of plants. The measure is aimed at modernising African agricultural practices, but some say it comes at the expense of age-old traditional farming practices, such as saving and re-using seed.

EU Parliament Adopts Reda Report On Copyright Reform

Reda

The European Parliament during its last plenary meeting before the summer break today adopted a non-legislative report on copyright reform prepared by Pirate Party Member Julia Reda. The report calls for an adaptation of the EU 2001 Copyright Directive to the digital market.

Paper: Commons Approach To European Knowledge Policy Could Yield Better Outcomes

Commons Brief

A new paper released earlier this month finds that the commons perspective, which embraces knowledge as a shared resource and its management a joint responsibility, could contribute to EU policy discussions and yield better policy outcomes in areas such as health, environment, science and culture, and the internet.

US Federal Judge Orders Cancellation Of Redskins’ Football Team Trademark Registrations

Washington Redskins logo

The Washington Post reports: The Washington Redskins – an American football team – lost their biggest legal and public relations battle yet in the war over their name after a federal judge on Wednesday ordered the cancellation of the NFL team’s federal trademark registrations, opposed for decades by Native American activists who call the moniker disparaging.

European Parliament Decides In Favour Of TTIP Mandate And “New ISDS”

Yannick Jadot,  Greens/EFA, makes a point in Parliament vote today

The European Parliament today voted in favour of its own mandate for the negotiations of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, a broad free trade agreement between its 28 member states and the United States. With 436 yes versus 241 no votes (32 abstentions), the Parliament adopted a resolution that also gives green light to the hotly debated investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), albeit a new version of it.

Copyright And The Public Interest: Not Necessarily Competing Forces

Neil Turkewitz

Copyright protection advances the public interest, and good public policy must properly consider “the role of intellectual property as a tool for economic emancipation, a catalyst for cultural diversity, and a powerful protector of individual dignity and fundamental human rights,” argues RIAA’s Neil Turkewitz.

Report: New Technologies For Visually And Hearing Impaired People Lack Commercialisation

Side event at the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights. Photo credit: Catherine Saez

A World Intellectual Property Organization patent landscaping report launched this week shows that although a large number of patents have been granted on technologies aimed to help visually and hearing impaired persons, most of them have not been commercialised yet.

Effects Of New Australian Blocking Legislation Remain Highly Controversial

cowboy-with-lasso

Much will depend on Australian federal judges after a website blocking bill targeting copyright violations was passed by both houses of the Australian legislature this week.