SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »
  • If this goes ahead, as the EU will "speak" for all... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    File Sharing More Opportunity Than Burden, Says Speaker At WIPO

    Published on 19 June 2012 @ 7:08 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    The music industry often claims that unauthorised file sharing online is ripping off artists and the economy to the tune of billions of dollars. Although such file-sharing is impacting sales, the losses are grossly overestimated by industry, according to a professor speaking last week at the World Intellectual Property Organization, who also said illegal downloading could prompt untapped markets for complementary products and services.

    The speaker addressed the first open seminar of the WIPO Academy on 15 June. The session entitled “IP Management: Copyright in the Digital Age,” had a particular focus on the internet’s influence on production, distribution, and demand for cultural products. The WIPO Academy, which is the educational arm of WIPO, offers courses on all aspects of intellectual property and its management.

    The session http://www.wipo.int/academy/en/courses/executive/ipm_seminar_12.html was presented by Felix Oberholzer-Gee, co-chair of the Executive Program: IP and Business Strategy at the Harvard Business School. He also is one of the core professors of the Executive Program of the WIPO Academy.

    The history of copyright is moving only in one direction said Oberholzer-Gee: towards stronger rights. However, technological development over the last decade opened the door to unauthorised file sharing and for the first time, as a result, copyright protection became inadvertently much weaker than it ever was, and much weaker than the law intended it to be, he added.

    Contrary to “silly industry studies,” he said, file sharing only affects a small fraction of creative works in music. The most exposed work is “the hot thing of the moment.” And the same is true for movies, he said.

    The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry’s (IFPI) digital music report 2011 [pdf] states that the industry “is still haemorrhaging revenue as a result of digital piracy.” The report projects 1.2 million jobs “to be lost in the European creative industries due to piracy by 2015,” and a staggering €240 billion of “estimated cumulative lost retail revenues to the European creative industries from piracy from 2008-2015.”

    Digital piracy, the report says, “is the single most important factor holding back further development of the legitimate music business.”

    Oberholzer-Gee argued, as others have, that a pirated piece of content is not necessarily a lost sale. Massive amounts of transfer of copyrighted material do not translate into the same amount of lost sales, as it does not mean the same amount of material would have been bought and paid.

    The decline in sale of copyrighted material may also be the sign of broader lifestyle changes, he said, noting that the decline in music expenditure started before internet came along. Internet also opened a new space for activities that can be direct substitutes for music, he said, adding that young people have many more opportunities to spend money than before, such as on cell phones or video games.

    The overall evidence is that in the music industry, piracy explains no more than 20 percent of sales decline, he said, and on movies, piracy has no effect. If a movie is run for free on television, it results in a rise of about 118 per cent in sales of the DVD of that particular movie on Amazon.com, and pirated goods do not change that trend, he added. Since the role of piracy is overstated, he asked, is there a reason to strengthen copyrights?

    Market for Complements

    A complement is a good or service that increases the revenue for another good, Oberholzer-Gee said, and there is a vast untapped market to be exploited, he said.

    There is a need to consider total revenue instead of focusing on CD sales, according to Oberholzer-Gee as when CD sales go down, complements such as concerts, merchandising, or revenue from collecting agencies go up, he said.

    Largely untapped, the market for complements should be explored, he said. This market directly benefits from weak copyright. “The lack of a market for complements is a lack of imagination,” he said.

    If established artists can generate substantial income through live performances and merchandise, “no major artist to date has been able to build a career on live performance alone,” the IFPI report said.

    When radio was invented, Oberholzer-Gee said, “the music industry went into shock.” A few years later, radio was a fantastic complement to music. The same happened when video cassette recorders came into the market, the movie industry was very worried, he said.

    Creation by artists comes from intrinsic motivation, which has a “huge role,” he said, citing Wikipedia, which he said is the most successful model for producing an encyclopaedia, and which put all its competitors out of business, with 650,000 contributors, and 11,000 contributors generating about 50 per cent of edits, for free.

    “One of biggest mistakes is confusing the need for compensation and the need for compensation for a particular level of activity,” he said, referring to a Pew study on 2,755 musicians and songwriters whose three fourths reported having another job unrelated to music, which was their primary income. In a paper co-published by Oberholzer-Gee and Koleman Strumpf of the University of Kansas, “File sharing and Copyright” [pdf], Oberholzer-Gee said the Pew study showed that 66 percent of the respondents said that less than 20 per cent of their income came from music.

    “Concert sales have increased more than music sales have fallen,” according to the paper, and since 2000, the number of recordings produced has more than doubled. “This makes it difficult to argue that weaker copyright protection has had a negative impact on artists’ incentives to be creative,” the authors wrote.

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.235.36.164