SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Inside Views
    Inside Views: Intérêt de l’entreprise et choix stratégiques : les licences concédées par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool

    Published on 14 March 2012 @ 10:28 pm

    Disclaimer: the views expressed in this column are solely those of the authors and are not associated with Intellectual Property Watch. IP-Watch expressly disclaims and refuses any responsibility or liability for the content, style or form of any posts made to this forum, which remain solely the responsibility of their authors.

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Par M. Brook K. Baker, Health GAP

    Bien que Gilead ait apporté des améliorations significatives en comparaison de ses précédentes licences volontaires portant sur des médicaments antirétroviraux essentiels, les licences que l’entreprise a concédées au Medicines Patent Pool, fondation créée par UNITAID, comportent des restrictions regrettables qui fragilisent leur impact sur l’accès à des antirétroviraux génériques de qualité et plus abordables dans les pays en développement. Parmi les principales faiblesses des licences de Gilead, on compte notamment l’exclusion géographique de nombreux pays à revenus faible et intermédiaires de l’Afrique du Nord, de l’Asie et de l’Amérique latine et des dispositions étranges limitant l’octroi de licences aux fabricants indiens et exigeant du bénéficiaire de licence qu’il s’approvisionne en principes actifs seulement auprès de Gilead ou de fournisseurs indiens autorisés. Une analyse pointilleuse des informations disponibles sur la situation des brevets de Gilead révèle que l’entreprise pharmaceutique s’appuie sur de fragiles revendications de brevet portant sur le ténofovir en Inde pour collecter des redevances sur les ventes dans 109 des 111 pays où elle n’a revendiqué aucun brevet. Les fabricants de génériques peuvent faire le choix judicieux de dissocier la licence sur le ténofovir des autres licences disponibles pour les médicaments en cours de développement. Ils pourront de cette manière approvisionner ces 109 pays (plus l’Inde), mais également de nombreux autres pays à revenu intermédiaire où Gilead ne possède aucun brevet susceptible de faire obstacle, tels que le Brésil. En outre, les pays exclus du champ d’application des licences de Gilead devraient soigneusement analyser les revendications des brevets accordés à Gilead sur leur territoire et en Inde afin de déterminer s’ils ont réellement besoin de délivrer des licences obligatoires pour les produits Gilead. Si tel est le cas, l’article 92A de la loi indienne sur les brevets est un recours simple pour permettre l’exportation des quantités nécessaires aux pays dont la capacité de fabrication est insuffisante. De même, les pays exclus devraient agir rapidement et de manière décisive afin de faire savoir à Gilead et aux autres détenteurs de droits sur les antirétroviraux que leur refus de coopérer pleinement avec le Medicines Patent Pool aura pour conséquence la mise en place de mesures d’autoprotection visant à permettre l’accès à des médicaments abordables.

    Ce qui suit se veut avant tout être une analyse critique et stratégique de la licence concédée par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool. Toutefois, les aspects positifs de la démarche de Gilead méritent d’être soulignés : première entreprise pharmaceutique à rejoindre le Medicines Patent Pool, Gilead offre des licences pour des médicaments importants en cours de développement et pour des antirétroviraux déjà disponibles. Gilead autorise également les associations avec des produits autres que les siens. Ses licences prévoient le transfert du savoir-faire technologique, favorisant une production efficace à l’échelle commerciale ; elles n’imposent pas le versement de redevances et garantissent un large accès aux formulations pédiatriques. Enfin, elles ne contiennent aucun droit d’exclusivité sur les données réglementaires nécessaires à la procédure d’enregistrement simplifiée des médicaments génériques et le domaine d’utilisation de la licence portant sur le ténofovir inclut la prévention et le traitement contre le VIH et l’hépatite B.

    Les principales faiblesses de la licence Gilead sont les suivantes : une portée géographique limitée (et qui varie selon l’antirétroviral concerné), une restriction excessive portant sur l’approvisionnement en principes actifs (possible uniquement auprès de fabricants indiens bénéficiaires d’une licence délivrée par Gilead ou le Medicines Patent Pool), l’octroi de licences de produit limité aux seuls fabricants de génériques indiens et le fait que, pour ce qui est du ténofovir, Gilead s’appuie sur des revendications de brevet extrêmement fragiles en Inde pour collecter des redevances sur les ventes réalisées dans 109 pays où l’entreprise ne possède pas de brevet.

    Heureusement, le Medicines Patent Pool a négocié des conditions de licence favorables qui vont permettre à ses potentiels bénéficiaires (les fabricants de médicaments génériques) et aux pays à revenu intermédiaire exclus d’avoir accès à des produits abordables comprenant du ténofovir. Grâce à la publication des licences concédées par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool et des licences entre Gilead, le Medicines Patent Pool et les bénéficiaires, les spécialistes sont en mesure de les analyser en détail. Ainsi, deux dispositions semblent pouvoir améliorer l’accès aux médicaments : le droit pour le bénéficiaire de dissocier les licences pour chaque antirétroviral (en résiliant par exemple la licence sur le ténofovir tout en conservant celles sur le cobicistat, l’elvitégravir et le Quad), et le droit pour le bénéficiaire d’approvisionner les pays où des licences obligatoires nécessaires auront été délivrées.

    L’analyse ci-après clarifie la manière dont les fabricants de génériques et les pays exclus peuvent avoir recours à la licence concédée par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool de manière sélective, aux flexibilités de l’Accord sur les ADPIC et aux dispositions de la loi indienne sur les brevets pour favoriser un accès universel aux versions génériques des produits Gilead. Le ténofovir est traité séparément des trois autres médicaments protégés par des licences, en raison des différences stratégiques qui le caractérisent.

    Rappel : A quoi servent les brevets et comment fonctionnent-ils?

    Les brevets sont des droits délivrés par les États pour empêcher les tiers de fabriquer, vendre, distribuer ou importer le produit breveté ou d’utiliser une invention brevetée pendant une période déterminée (qui est actuellement de 20 ans). Pour que son invention soit protégée dans un pays, l’inventeur doit y déposer une demande de brevet. Dans certaines régions, il lui est possible également de faire une demande pour un groupe de pays. La demande est examinée du point de vue de la forme et pour confirmer que l’invention répond aux critères de nouveauté, d’inventivité et d’applicabilité industrielle.

    Il n’existe pas de brevet à l’échelle mondiale : la protection n’est possible qu’au niveau national ou régional. En raison de l’incertitude relative au marché auquel l’invention est destinée et des coûts liés à la demande et au maintien en vigueur d’un brevet, de nombreux inventeurs de produits pharmaceutiques déposent une demande uniquement dans certains pays. De manière générale, ils se détournent des pays les plus petits et les plus démunis, qui ne disposent pas d’une capacité de production pharmaceutique nationale. Il faut également rappeler que l’interprétation des critères de brevetabilité (nouveauté, inventivité, applicabilité industrielle) varie selon les pays, tout comme les exclusions de brevetabilité (par exemple, le droit de breveter une utilisation ou une indication thérapeutique nouvelle d’un médicament existant). Certains des pays les moins avancés ont finalement profité de la prolongation de la dérogation à leurs obligations de l’Accord sur les ADPIC jusqu’à 2016 concernant la délivrance de brevets sur les produits pharmaceutiques et l’exclusivité des données, même s’ils sont encore trop peu nombreux à avoir recours à cette solution. En résumé, une demande de brevet pour un médicament donné peut être accordée dans un pays et refusée dans un autre.

    Pour compliquer davantage les choses, il est courant de constater, pour un seul médicament, le dépôt et/ou l’octroi de plusieurs brevets dans le but de protéger notamment le principe actif, un dosage, une formulation, un mode d’administration, une indication, un procédé de fabrication du produit ou encore des combinaisons de deux médicaments ou plus en une seule gélule. Ainsi, des entreprises pharmaceutiques contournent régulièrement le système, en essayant de protéger des substances chimiques ou des formulations légèrement modifiées, des utilisations ou méthodes de production nouvelles, de manière à renouveler sans fin la période d’exclusivité de 20 ans relative à un médicament, en accumulant des brevets autour d’un même principe actif.

    La dernière mise au point contextuelle porte sur la détermination du statut du brevet d’un médicament, qui est cruciale autant dans les pays où le médicament est fabriqué et distribué que dans ceux où il est importé et utilisé, le cas échéant. Ainsi, si un pays souhaite importer la version générique d’un médicament et qu’aucun brevet ne l’en empêche au niveau national, il peut néanmoins se heurter à un brevet dans le pays de fabrication. De la même manière, même si aucun brevet n’est déposé dans le pays de fabrication, il peut en exister un dans le pays d’importation qui fasse obstacle.

    Les licences obligatoires comme moyen de contourner en toute légalité les brevets faisant obstacle

    L’obstacle que constitue un brevet dans le pays de fabrication ou dans le pays d’importation et d’utilisation peut être contourné grâce à des licences obligatoires. Même si de nombreux pays n’ont pas encore révisé leur législation pour profiter pleinement des flexibilités de l’Accord sur les ADPIC, de manière à pouvoir octroyer des licences obligatoires rapidement, la majorité des pays en développement possèdent un système de licences obligatoires. Ces États peuvent alors utiliser ces mécanismes qui leur permettent de délivrer des licences pour produire sur leur territoire et importer les produits de fabricants de génériques implantés dans d’autres pays.

    Si un pays importateur ne possède aucun brevet, mais que le médicament importé est breveté dans le pays de fabrication ou le pays exportateur, alors une licence obligatoire devra être délivrée conformément à l’Accord sur les ADPIC et aux lois en vigueur dans le pays d’exportation. Une licence obligatoire classique permet l’exportation de quantités non significatives (Art. 31 (f) de l’Accord sur les ADPIC) ; une licence délivrée pour remédier à une pratique anticoncurrentielle rend possible l’exportation de quantités illimitées (Art. 31 (k) de l’Accord sur les ADPIC). Les licences telles que définies par le paragraphe 6 de la Déclaration de Doha ou Décision du 30 août 2003 permettent l’exportation de quantités nécessaires à un pays lorsque celui-ci ne possède pas de capacité de fabrication pharmaceutique suffisante. Lorsque le pays importateur et utilisateur, et non le pays exportateur, a octroyé un brevet, une licence obligatoire conforme à l’Accord sur les ADPIC et à la législation nationale doit être délivrée dans le pays importateur au(x) fabricant(s) de génériques du pays exportateur (licence obligatoire au titre de l’article 31 ou du paragraphe 6 / Décision du 30 août). Si des brevets présentent un obstacle à la fois dans le pays importateur et dans le pays exportateur, il est nécessaire de délivrer deux licences obligatoires, une dans chaque pays. La loi indienne sur les brevets revêt une importance particulière, puisque l’industrie nationale des génériques fournit environ 90 % des médicaments contre le VIH utilisés dans les pays en développement. L’Inde bénéficie de certains avantages au niveau de ses procédures d’exportation qui lui permettent de répondre aux besoins en médicaments de qualité garantie plus abordables des pays ne possédant pas la capacité de fabrication suffisante. Selon l’article 92A:

    • (1) Une licence obligatoire devra être délivrée pour la fabrication et l’exportation de produits pharmaceutiques brevetés vers tout pays disposant d’une capacité de fabrication insuffisante ou inexistante dans le domaine pharmaceutique pour le produit concerné en vue de répondre à des problèmes de santé publique, à condition qu’une licence obligatoire ait été octroyée par ce pays ou que ce dernier ait, par voie de notification ou par tout autre moyen, autorisé l’importation desdits produits brevetés de l’Inde.
    • (2) Le Contrôleur des brevets devra, sous réserve de la conformité de la demande, octroyer une licence obligatoire portant uniquement sur la fabrication et l’exportation du produit pharmaceutique en question vers ledit pays, et ce, conformément aux éventuelles dispositions qu’il aura établies et publiées.
    • (3) Les dispositions des paragraphes (1) et (2) s’appliqueront sans préjudice des autres dispositions de la présente loi permettant l’exportation de produits pharmaceutiques fabriqués dans le cadre d’une licence obligatoire. Explication : aux fins du présent article, l’expression « produit pharmaceutique » s’entend de tout produit du secteur pharmaceutique breveté, ou fabriqué au moyen d’un procédé breveté, nécessaire pour remédier aux problèmes de santé publique. Il est entendu qu’elle comprend également les principes actifs nécessaires à la fabrication du produit et les kits de diagnostic nécessaires à son utilisation.

    On pourrait penser que l’article 92A a été voté pour concrétiser en Inde le principe établi par le paragraphe 6 / Décision du 30 août et qu’il appelle donc les notifications et procédures particulières relatives à ce système complexe et inextricable. Cependant, il serait plus juste d’y voir, en s’appuyant sur les termes employés, la possibilité pour un pays possédant une capacité de fabrication insuffisante de déclencher en Inde la délivrance d’une licence obligatoire à l’exportation, en donnant la preuve de l’existence d’une licence obligatoire dans le pays importateur ou de l’autorisation par ce dernier d’importer d’Inde un produit pharmaceutique breveté, par voie de notification ou par tout autre moyen, et en veillant à ce que le(s) candidat(s) ai(en)t bien soumis au Contrôleur des brevets une demande de licence obligatoire à l’exportation conforme.

    À ce jour, l’Office des brevets n’a semble-t-il établi aucune règle ni aucune norme précisant les modalités ou les conditions requises. Par conséquent, n’importe quel pays, y compris ceux qui ont été exclus de la portée géographique des licences Gilead, est en mesure d’informer le Contrôleur des brevets indien par courrier ou par tout autre moyen qu’il autorise les importations en raison de l’absence de capacité de fabrication suffisante à l’échelle nationale (ou qu’il a délivré une licence obligatoire autorisant les importations en provenance d’Inde). Même si une telle interprétation ne correspondait pas à ce que prévoit le paragraphe 6 / Décision du 30 août, dont les critères sont plus stricts, elle n’en serait pas moins conforme à l’Accord sur les ADPIC, comme une exception limitée entrant dans le cadre de l’article 30 à la règle de l’utilisation des licences obligatoires principalement pour le marché intérieur établie par l’article 31 (f). Gilead ne pourrait, semble-t-il, s’appuyer sur aucune disposition contractuelle pour contester cette interprétation, étant donné que l’accord établi entre Gilead, le Medicines Patent Pool et le bénéficiaire exige seulement un accord entre Gilead et le bénéficiaire de licence (qui ne pourra être dénoncé sans motif) sur l’existence, la portée et le contenu de toute licence obligatoire, sans qu’il soit question du régime juridique qui l’a octroyée.

    Même si l’on interprète l’article 92A comme appelant des notifications et des mesures de lutte contre le détournement, ainsi que le prévoit le paragraphe 6 / Décision du 30 août, la procédure indienne relative aux licences obligatoires pour l’exportation est très simple et entraîne l’obligation de délivrer la licence à l’exportation requise.

    Le statut des brevets de Gilead fragile pour le ténofovir, plus solide pour les médicaments en cours de développement

    Dans la vaste majorité des pays à revenu faible, et dans un grand nombre de pays à revenu intermédiaire, aucune demande de brevet n’a été déposée par Gilead pour le ténofovir. Ainsi, Gilead n’a déposé une demande de brevet ou obtenu un brevet qu’en Inde et en Indonésie, c’est-à-dire dans deux pays sur les 111 couverts par la licence du Medicines Patent Pool sur le ténofovir. Qui plus est, l’Inde a rejeté certaines des demandes de brevet déposées par Gilead pour le ténofovir en raison de critères exigeants en matière de brevetabilité et d’exclusion de brevetabilité. En effet, il n’est pas possible en Inde de breveter les modifications de substances chimiques connues, sauf si elles ont des retombées positives et significatives sur le plan thérapeutique. La découverte du ténofovir datant de 1985, la plupart des spécialistes pensent que les demandes divisionnaires de brevet non encore examinées portant sur le disoproxil et le fumarate seront déclarées comme répondant aux conditions de l’article 3(d) de la loi indienne sur les brevets et que les entreprises indiennes peuvent tout à fait fabriquer des produits à base de ténofovir sans être en violation avec l’unique brevet octroyé en Inde à ce jour, qui protège le procédé de fabrication.

    Comme le montre le tableau de statut des brevets présenté ci-après, Gilead n’a jamais déposé de brevet pour le ténofovir dans 109 des 111 pays couverts par la licence sur ce produit. L’entreprise n’a pas non plus obtenu de brevet pour le ténofovir dans un grand nombre de pays à revenu intermédiaire exclus qui connaissent une lourde charge de morbidité due au VIH, parmi lesquels l’Argentine, le Brésil, le Chili, la Colombie, la Malaisie, le Pérou, les Philippines, l’Ukraine et l’Uruguay. Malheureusement, le ténofovir est breveté dans certains des 45 pays à revenus faible et intermédiaire exclus, parmi lesquels se trouvent des marchés de grande envergure, comme le Mexique ou la Chine. Les informations concernant le statut des brevets protégeant le ténofovir dans les 34 pays exclus restants ne sont pas claires.

    La cartographie des brevets concernant le cobicistat et l’elvitégravir/Quad est un peu plus complexe. Même si un petit nombre de brevets ont déjà été octroyés dans des certains pays, il reste une certaine quantité de demandes de brevets encore en instance d’examen, dont un grand nombre devraient être accordés, même en Inde, puisque ces médicaments impliquent chacun une nouvelle substance chimique. Toutefois, aucun brevet ne semble avoir été demandé pour le cobicistat dans 61 des 102 territoires couverts ni pour l’elvitégravir/Quad dans 58 des 99 territoires couverts.

    CARTOGRAPHIE DES BREVETS GILEAD*

    * Informations tirées de la base de données sur le statut des brevets du Medicines Patent Pool et communiquées par Gilead au titre de la licence concédée au Medicines Patent Pool. Remarque : même Gilead a communiqué des informations sur le statut des brevets dans les pays couverts par la License, aucun renseignement sur les revendications de brevet dans les territoires non couverts n’a été communiquée par Gilead. Les données portant sur les territoires non couverts ont été trouvées dans la base de données du Medicines Patent Pool sur les brevets, disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://www.medicinespatentpool.org/LICENSING/Patent-Status-of-ARVs.

    Pourquoi les licences Gilead comportent-elles des restrictions relatives aux principes actifs ?

    Les accords entre Gilead et le Medicines Patent Pool et entre Gilead, le Medicines Patent Pool et le bénéficiaire limitent l’octroi de licences appliquées à des principes actifs et des produits pharmaceutiques aux fabricants indiens de génériques et exigent d’eux qu’ils s’approvisionnent en principes actifs : auprès des fournisseurs agrées par Gilead, auprès du service de fabrication de principes actifs de l’entreprise, ou auprès d’un autre bénéficiaire indien de la licence concédée par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool. En imposant ces restrictions, Gilead exclut la possibilité de s’approvisionner auprès de fournisseurs originaires de Chine (gros producteur de principes actifs), d’Asie, d’Amérique latine ou d’Afrique, qui pourraient devenir des producteurs fiables de principes actifs de qualité garantie. De la même manière, en orientant l’exclusivité vers l’Inde, Gilead empêche les producteurs indiens de principes actifs bénéficiaires de licence d’exporter leur production vers d’autres pays où des fabricants pourraient en toute légalité formuler des génériques de qualité garantie.

    Gilead justifie cette limitation aux seules entreprises indiennes certifiées GMP et ayant reçu l’agrément de l’Agence européenne des médicaments, de l’Agence fédérale américaine des produits alimentaires et pharmaceutiques ou la préqualification de l’OMS par la mise en place déjà effective de relations avec 13 de ces entreprises grâce à ses précédentes licences volontaires et par la confiance placée dans la qualité et la rentabilité de leurs procédés de fabrication. Un cynique pourrait y voir une manœuvre de Gilead pour chercher à tirer profit de nouvelles économies d’échelle, réalisées grâce à ces fournisseurs indiens de principes actifs (qui, en lui vendant leur production à un prix encore plus bas, lui permettent d’augmenter ses bénéfices escomptés, puisque les prix pratiqués dans les pays riches ne seront sans doute pas baissés) et pour tenter d’empêcher le développement d’une industrie des génériques solide en Chine et d’une production de principes actifs dans les pays moins avancés (comme l’Ouganda ou le Bangladesh) qui pourraient profiter de la prorogation de l’Accord sur les ADPIC jusqu’en 2016 concernant les brevets des produits pharmaceutiques (et une possible prolongation de celle-ci).

    Dans tous les cas, par cette décision, Gilead a miné les efforts menés par la région Afrique pour réduire sa dépendance au niveau du secteur pharmaceutique, même si l’entreprise pourra mettre en avant son unique accord de licence conclu avec Aspen Pharmacare, qui lui permet de vendre du ténofovir dans toute la région sub-saharienne, comme preuve de son engagement auprès des producteurs africains.

    Choix stratégiques

    Les fabricants de génériques et les pays en développement exclus de la portée géographique des licences de Gilead sur les principes actifs doivent faire face à des choix stratégiques essentiels pour réagir à la licence concédée par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool. La partie suivante s’intéresse aux possibilités offertes aux potentiels bénéficiaires de licence et aux pays exclus de la portée géographique de la licence.

    Licence sur le ténofovir : envisager le rejet

    La question essentielle à laquelle les fabricants de générique doivent répondre est la suivante : faut-il ou non rejeter la licence sur le ténofovir ? Par chance, il leur est possible de la dissocier des autres licences concédées par Gilead pour d’autres antirétroviraux, grâce aux habiles négociations du Medicines Patent Pool. Les entreprises pourraient donc prendre la décision de rejeter cette licence en raison de la fragilité des revendications de brevet de Gilead concernant le ténofovir en Inde et de la forte probabilité que celles-ci soient déboutées par l’Office des brevets et les tribunaux indiens. Les raisons qui mettent en doute la brevetabilité du ténofovir en Inde sont les suivantes : d’une part, le fait que la substance originale du ténofovir et ses propriétés antirétrovirales ont été découvertes par des chercheurs tchèques en 1985, bien avant la date d’entrée en vigueur de l’Accord sur les ADPIC, qui a imposé à l’Inde la brevetabilité des nouveaux produits pharmaceutiques inventés seulement après 1995, et, d’autre part, les caractères nouveaux et inventifs du disoproxil et du fumarate qui restent à prouver, les revendications relatives à ces inventions impliquant des substances chimiques existantes sans pour autant offrir une efficacité thérapeutique nouvelle et significative, comme l’exige la loi indienne. L’unique brevet accordé, qui protège le procédé de fabrication, n’apparaît pas comme un obstacle à des procédés alternatifs de fabrication de médicaments à base de ténofovir. Dans le cas où les entreprises indiennes n’opteraient pas pour la licence et où les revendications de Gilead en Inde seraient infondées, les fabricants indiens de génériques pourraient tout de même vendre des médicaments à base de ténofovir dans 110 des territoires couverts par la licence (à l’exception de l’Indonésie, où des brevets pourraient être octroyés pour le ténofovir). En outre, les entreprises non bénéficiaires de licence ne connaîtraient aucun obstacle découlant d’un brevet pour vendre en Argentine, au Brésil, au Chili, en Colombie, en Malaisie, au Pérou, aux Philippines, en Ukraine et en Uruguay, ni dans les 34 pays à revenus intermédiaire où le statut du brevet pour le ténofovir reste flou.

    De la même manière, le fait de rejeter la licence n’empêcherait en rien les entreprises d’associer le ténofovir à d’autres principes actifs de Gilead protégés par une licence (le cobicistat et l’elvitégravir) au moins dans les territoires couverts par les licences sur le cobicistat et l’elvitégravir/Quad. Qui plus est, ces fabricants indiens pourraient devenir les bénéficiaires de licences obligatoires à l’importation/l’exportation dans des pays où le ténofovir est protégé par un brevet.

    Par conséquent, à l’exception peut-être de la perte des exportations sans licence obligatoire vers l’Indonésie, de certains doutes planant sur la décision entourant le brevet sur le ténofovir en Inde, et la perte des droits liés à l’enregistrement des données dans les pays ou l’exclusivité des données peut (ou non) remettre en question l’enregistrement d’un produit, les arguments contre le rejet de la licence sur le ténofovir sont faibles voire inexistants.

    Licences sur le cobicistat et l’elvitégravir/Quad : accepter plutôt que rejeter

    Étant donné la probabilité que le cobicistat et l’elvitégravir soient brevetés en Inde, les fabricants indiens de génériques devraient probablement accepter les licences sur ces produits. Bien que le Quad ne sera probablement pas breveté individuellement en Inde car il pourrait correspondre à un simple composé ou à un additif de substances existantes (comme le prévoient l’article 3, paragraphes (d) et(e)), sa production pourrait être bloquée sauf si les entreprises négocient des droits de License ou des engagements de la part des titulaires de brevets de ne pas initier de poursuites relatives au cobicistat, à l’elvitégravir et à l’emtricitabine (en partant du fait que le ténofovir n’est pas breveté). Le fait d’accepter les licences restreindrait les ventes à 103 ou 99 territoires couverts, mais les bénéficiaires de la licence concédée par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool pourraient toujours fabriquer ou fournir pour l’importation ou l’exportation si les licences obligatoires requises venaient à être délivrées en Inde et dans le pays d’importation/d’utilisation (le cas échéant).

    Pays importateurs exclus sans brevet faisant obstacle

    Les pays ne possédant pas de brevet faisant obstacle au ténofovir, mais exclus des territoires couverts par la licence concédée par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool sur le ténofovir, pourraient choisir un fournisseur de génériques produisant du ténofovir en toute légalité si :

    • (1) cette entreprise est un fabricant indien qui a rejeté la licence sur le ténofovir mais dont la production est destinée à une utilisation nationale en Inde et à l’exportation, dans le cas où les revendications de brevet de Gilead concernant le ténofovir en Inde sont infondées ;
    • (2) cette entreprise est un fabricant de génériques exerçant en toute légalité dans un pays autre que l’Inde (et qui pourrait appartenir aux pays les moins avancés bénéficiant de la prorogation de l’Accord sur les ADPIC) ;
    • (3) la capacité de fabrication pharmaceutique du pays demandeur est insuffisante, et que ce dernier en a informé le Contrôleur des brevets d’Inde, conformément à la réglementation, et a obtenu une licence obligatoire à l’importation/l’exportation pour des quantités nécessaires, conformément à l’article 92A de la loi indienne sur les brevets.

    Pour ce qui est du cobicistat, de l’elvitégravir et du Quad, les pays pourraient ne trouver qu’un nombre plus limité d’entreprises indiennes ayant rejeté les licences portant sur ces principes actifs, auquels cas ils devraient s’approvisionner conformément à la deuxième et la troisième proposition présentées ci-dessus. Dans tous les cas, en raison du caractère essentiel que revêt la qualité, les pays importateurs doivent s’approvisionner en antirétroviraux auprès de fabricants de génériques certifiés GMP et dont les produits ont été préqualifiés par l’OMS ou bénéficient de l’agrément d’une autorité de régulation rigoureuse.

    Pays importateurs exclus possédant des brevets faisant obstacle

    Si le ténofovir, le cobicistat, l’elvitégravir et/ou le Quad sont brevetés dans un pays exclu des territoires couverts par les licences Gilead, celui-ci devra délivrer une licence obligatoire qui autorise la production sur le territoire national et l’importation. Si l’importation est requise, le pays devra s’informer du statut du brevet Gilead dans le pays de fabrication/exportateur pour savoir si une licence obligatoire doit également y être délivrée. Si le pays exportateur est l’Inde, le pays importateur peut envisager une licence obligatoire pour l’importation de quantités non significatives, une licence pour remédier à une pratique anticoncurrentielle pour l’importation de quantités illimitées ou une licence répondant aux critères de l’article 92A pour l’exportation des quantités nécessaires vers des pays ne possédant pas de capacité de fabrication suffisante. Remarque : il n’est pas certain que l’article 92A appelle l’ensemble des notifications et des mesures anti-contournement exigées par le système du paragraphe 6 / Décision du 30 août.

    Conclusion

    Même si la licence concédée par Gilead au Medicines Patent Pool est loin d’être parfaite, il est encore possible pour les fabricants indiens de génériques et les pays en développement exclus de faire des choix stratégiques qui pourront leur permettre d’améliorer au maximum l’accès à des antirétroviraux plus abordables. Les fabricants de génériques devraient envisager le rejet de la licence sur le ténofovir, même s’ils décident d’accepter les autres. Les pays non couverts ou non bénéficiaires pourraient s’approvisionner en médicaments auprès de fabricants de génériques dans des pays où aucun brevet ne fait entrave, ou si les licences obligatoires nécessaires on été délivrées, dans le pays d’exportation, en Inde, ou dans les deux. Lorsqu’une licence obligatoire est nécessaire, elle peut être facilement obtenue en Inde conformément à la législation nationale. Cependant, les pays exclus devraient agir de manière décisive et peut-être plus coordonnée pour obtenir des licences obligatoires, à la fois pour améliorer l’accès à des médicaments abordables et pour faire comprendre aux détenteurs de droits que les pays exclus de la portée géographique des licences du Medicines Patent Pool ne resteront pas sur la touche et sauront mettre en œuvre des stratégies compensatoires.


    Brook K. Baker est professeur de droit à la faculté de droit américaine Northeastern University School of Law et membre de son programme pour les droits humains et l’économie mondiale. Chercheur honoraire à la Faculté de droit de l’Université Kwazulu Natal, en Afrique du Sud, il est également analyste politique pour Health Global Aspect Project et écrit régulièrement sur la propriété intellectuelle, le commerce et l’accès aux médicaments.

    Liens dans cet article:
    [1] The Patent Status Database for HIV Medicines
    [2] Medicines Patent Pool Signs Deal With Indian Generics Producer
    [3] Medicines Patent Pool Responds To Critics Of Gilead Licence
    [4] Medicines Patent Pool Boosts HIV Drug Prospects With First Licence

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.89.67.228