SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Analysis: Monkey In The Middle Of Selfie Copyright Dispute

The recent case of a monkey selfie that went viral on the web raised thorny issues of ownership between a (human) photographer and Wikimedia. Two attorneys from Morrison & Foerster sort out the relevant copyright law.


Latest Comments
  • are you aware that within the photographic industr... »
  • A VPN is a virtual private network, which generall... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Inside Views
    Inside Views: Rapport entre propriété intellectuelle, transfert de technologie et développement

    Published on 24 August 2010 @ 5:23 pm

    Disclaimer: the views expressed in this column are solely those of the authors and are not associated with Intellectual Property Watch. IP-Watch expressly disclaims and refuses any responsibility or liability for the content, style or form of any posts made to this forum, which remain solely the responsibility of their authors.

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Par Cheikh Kane

    Une analyse des pratiques et des politiques impliquant la propriété intellectuelle, le transfert de technologie et le développement démontre la difficulté à parvenir à une corrélation positive entre les différents domaines. [Note: an English version of this piece has been posted here.]

    Afin de mieux comprendre le lien existant entre droits de propriété intellectuelle, transfert de technologie et développement, une analyse a récemment été menée sur les attentes des pays en voie de développement, particulièrement en Afrique sub-saharienne, en matière de transfert de technologie. Cette analyse démontre la nécessité de mettre en place un système de droits de propriété intellectuelle efficace et souple, et de faire la promotion de l’innovation au niveau local pour faire de la technologie le moteur du développement.

    Elle s’appuie sur des recherches et sur les réponses apportées à un questionnaire envoyé à des universités et des centres de recherche et de développement de la région ouest africaine.

    1) Contexte et défis

    L’Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle (OMPI) a adopté un nouveau Plan d’action en 2007, la lenteur de sa mise en application a généré de nombreux débats. S’agit-il d’une stratégie prudente, aboutissant à des résultats peu rapides mais fiables, ou la situation est-elle dans l’impasse? Les discussions semblent être « au point mort », comme l’a suggéré un participant à un groupe d’experts genevois.

    À présent il s’agira, dans le cadre cette analyse, de prendre les devants en analysant la corrélation entre transfert de technologie, propriété intellectuelle et développement à la lumière de la mise en application du Plan d’action.

    Le Plan d’action de l’OMPI pour le développement regroupe plusieurs objectifs répartis par groupes, de A à D. La recommandation « Transfert de technologie, techniques de l’information et de la communication (TIC) et accès aux savoirs » (groupe C)1 soulève un grand intérêt, notamment en raison des enjeux liés au développement économique et socioculturel. L’intérêt est de trouver le juste équilibre entre le profit économique au travers de la protection de la propriété intellectuelle et les inquiétudes liées au développement durable lors du transfert de technologie.

    2) Domaines pouvant tirer profit du transfert de technologie

    Le Plan d’action énonce clairement que le transfert de technologie devrait promouvoir la réalisation d’objectifs de développement. Cependant, cette certitude devient moins évidente lorsqu’il faut choisir où et de quelle manière le transfert doit s’opérer, et définir le juste équilibre entre une protection renforcée de la propriété intellectuelle et le besoin urgent de répondre aux nécessités liées au développement (nourriture, agriculture, santé et environnement).

    2.1) Difficultés liées aux transferts directs ou indirects

    L’application des recommandations du groupe C remet en question le bien-fondé d’un transfert de technologie lorsque celui-ci pourrait accroître la concurrence. Il est légitime de s’interroger sur la nature du transfert à opérer, qui peut être direct ou indirect. Les pays développés optent généralement pour l’installation de filiales de leurs entreprises dans les pays en voie de développement (transfert indirect). Dans les pays en voie de développement, il est plus fréquent de voir des acteurs nationaux solliciter auprès de partenaires étrangers des investissements privés qui déboucheront sur un transfert de technologie (transfert direct).

    Dans le cas du transfert indirect, on remarque un manque de diffusion des technologies à l’échelle nationale. Malgré la bonne volonté affichée ou présumée d’une multinationale pour former la main d’œuvre locale à l’usage de celles-ci, les résultats du questionnaire ne laissent aucun doute sur le fait que ces technologies ne sont pas diffusées dans l’ensemble du pays.

    Aucune véritable compétence locale n’émerge au travers de la possession de technologies qui ont été transférées. À l’échelle locale, l’expérience a prouvé à de nombreuses reprises que le renforcement des capacités par les entreprises à l’origine du transfert de technologie ou les compétences techniques des responsables locaux faisaient défaut. Il n’existe que de rares exemples d’entreprises locales indépendantes créées à la suite d’un transfert de technologie et utilisant la technologie transférée.

    Le problème peut être lié à la protection des droits de propriété intellectuelle, qui continuent de s’appliquer à la technologie (brevet, droit d’auteur, licence) ou à la difficulté financière et d’encadrement rencontrée par les acteurs locaux qui tentent d’exploiter ces technologies.

    Au cours de la période qui a suivi la décolonisation, entre les années 60 et les années 80, le transfert direct était de loin le moyen le plus utilisé par les pays les moins avancés de l’Afrique sub-saharienne2. Cette situation a conduit à l’achat en masse de services technologiques, qui a engendré un véritable « cimetière de machines », au lieu de donner naissance à des systèmes innovants créateurs de biens, de produits et de services.

    Dès lors, ce type de transfert reste un écueil dans la mise en application de ce groupe de recommandations du Plan d’action.

    2.2) Domaines de priorité pour les transferts

    La définition des priorités en termes de transfert de technologie est une question épineuse qui va bien au-delà du choix d’un modèle de transfert, car en Afrique sub-saharienne la plupart des secteurs sont des domaines prioritaires (santé, éducation, agriculture, énergie).

    Jusqu’à maintenant, l’agriculture est le domaine où les transferts de technologies ont été les plus nombreux, entre pays du Nord et du Sud, et entre pays du Sud3 . Le problème en Afrique est que l’ordre de priorité des transferts n’est pas simple à définir, tous les secteurs nécessitant des avancées technologiques. En s’appuyant sur cette observation, le Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle de l’OMPI recommande « le recensement de trois questions pressantes pour lesquelles les technologies appropriées pourraient contribuer efficacement à améliorer les conditions de vie: le secteur de la santé, le secteur de l’agriculture, et le secteur de l’énergie ».

    Dans le cadre du Plan d’action de l’OMPI, c’est aux pays membres de formuler leurs besoins en la matière. Cependant, il est légitime de se demander si cette approche remportera plus de succès. Seuls deux pays africains (l’Ouganda et la Tanzanie) ont fourni la liste de leurs besoins au titre du programme Aide pour le commerce de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC). Comment les choses vont-elles se dérouler dans le cadre du Plan d’action? Les pays en voie de développement seront-ils prêts à soumettre la liste de leurs besoins en matière de transfert de technologie? Certains États membres ont déjà fait part de leur scepticisme concernant la définition des besoins en transfert de technologie. Une proposition a été faite de dresser le bilan de ce qui a été accompli dans le domaine des transferts de technologie avant de mettre le Plan d’action en application.

    Si l’on retient un domaine en particulier, par exemple celui de la santé, les technologies y afférant sont protégées par une multitude de brevets. S’il est sûr que les brevets ne représentent pas le seul obstacle à l’innovation et à l’acquisition de technologie, il n’en reste pas moins que davantage de souplesse en la matière serait profitable à la recherche et à l’innovation dans les pays les moins avancés4 .

    Les droits des brevets peuvent lourdement entraver le transfert de technologie car ils entraînent des dépenses conséquentes liées à la licence, et peuvent ainsi enrayer l’adaptation du savoir aux conditions locales. Un biologiste éminent et ministre de la Recherche scientifique et technique d’un pays d’Afrique occidentale a expliqué qu’afin de « valoriser et favoriser l’utilisation des découvertes scientifiques en Afrique, un système de droits de propriété intellectuelle souple et efficace est nécessaire »5.

    La protection limitée de la propriété intellectuelle par le passé a favorisé la formation technologique dans des pays comme l’Inde, l’Égypte et la Corée. Les droits de propriété intellectuelle et notamment ceux des brevets peuvent avoir des répercussions sur le transfert de technologie que le Plan d’action doit prendre en compte. Il en est de même pour le rôle des offices de propriété intellectuelle.

    3) Le rôle des organisations locales: l’exemple d’OAPI

    L’Organisation africaine de la propriété intellectuelle (OAPI) n’est pas en faveur d’un allégement de la réglementation entourant la protection des brevets. Son rôle dans le transfert de technologie n’est pas clairement défini, même si dans ses objectifs, l’OAPI entend encourager la créativité et le transfert de technologie. De par son rôle d’administrateur de l’Accord de Bangui révisé, l’OAPI a clairement fait le choix de poursuivre le transfert de technologie en accroissant la protection des droits de brevets et en encourageant l’établissement au niveau local d’industries pharmaceutiques étrangères pour la production de génériques. On peut se demander dans quelle mesure l’Accord de Bangui révisé peut stimuler le transfert de technologie au travers de la promotion de l’investissement et dans le même temps limiter les opportunités d’utiliser les possibilités offertes par l’Accord sur les aspects des droits de propriété intellectuelle qui touchent au commerce (ADPIC) de l’OMC.

    4) La propriété intellectuelle pour la protection de l’innovation locale

    L’équation entre la propriété intellectuelle, le transfert de technologie et le développement compte plusieurs inconnues que le Plan d’action devrait vivement s’employer à trouver. Le transfert de technologie tels que défini sous cet agenda privilégie les technologies qui viennent d’ailleurs. La promotion et la protection de l’innovation locale au travers de la propriété intellectuelle se rapprochent plus des questions de développement. Quel est l’intérêt d’essayer de résoudre des problèmes de développement en transférant des technologies prévues pour un autre environnement?

    Le développement surviendra lorsque les acteurs africains ne recevront plus de technologies prêtes à l’emploi pour lesquelles ils ne sont pas formés, mais plutôt des technologies adaptées à la réalité de leur continent. Joseph Ki-Zerbo, homme politique et historien burkinabé de renom, a déclaré à ce titre sur un site Internet consacré à son travail que « les techniciens africains ne doivent pas être déracinés de leur culture, pour qu’il y ait une réelle appropriation de l’invention technologique ».

    Pour Ki-Zerbo, « Dormir sur la natte d’un autre, c’est comme dormir par terre ».

    L’adoption d’un Plan d’action par l’OMPI doit intégrer l’idée que la propriété intellectuelle devrait servir tout d’abord et avant tout à promouvoir et à protéger l’innovation locale. Le système de propriété intellectuelle international, tel qu’il est conçu, n’apporte aucun soutien à l’inventivité locale.


    Cheikh Kane, a Senegalese national and Swiss resident, is a lawyer specialized in international trade law and intellectual property law, and is a researcher for Intellectual Property Watch. He worked for several years as a legal adviser in a holding company where he managed legal aspects of services and technologies. He holds a master of advanced studies (LL.M.) in international and European economic and commercial law from Geneva University and a master in business law from Dakar University, Senegal. He also holds professional certificates in biotechnology and intellectual property rights and in copyrights and related rights.


    1. groupe C: Transfert de technologie, techniques de l’information et de la communication (TIC) et accès aux savoirs [^]
    2. G. de Villiers, Domination de la technique et techniques de la domination: Transferts de technologie et développement, p.12 [^]
    3. L’Impact de la Technologie Agricole en Afrique Sub-Saharienne, Une Synthèse des Découvertes du Symposium, septembre 1993, services d’édition AMEX International, Inc. [^]
    4. La ruée vers les brevets: un frein potentiel au transfert, South Bulletin, 8 mars 2010, numéro 44 [^]
    5. UNIVERSITÉS: Ces réalités qui freinent la recherche, ExcelAfrica [^]

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.83.229.255