SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Latest Comments
  • So simply put, we have the NABP saying that all ph... »
  • The original Brustle decision was widely criticise... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Empresa de código abierto presenta alegato sobre antimonopolio contra IBM; IBM solicita análisis

    Published on 26 April 2010 @ 11:30 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    El gigante de la computación IBM enfrenta una reclamación fundada en las disposiciones antimonopolio, presentada ante la Comisión Europea por una empresa de programas informáticos de código abierto que alega que IBM impide que los clientes usen tales programas. A la comunidad de programas informáticos de código abierto le preocupa que el uso que IBM (un fabricante líder de estos programas) haga de los derechos de propiedad intelectual (PI) para bloquear a un competidor ponga en peligro los programas informáticos de código abierto gratuitos y pueda destapar otras reclamaciones por derechos de PI de otros agentes. IBM, por su parte, reafirma su apoyo a la comunidad de programas informáticos de código abierto y ha solicitado a la empresa competidora que explique de qué modo su programa informático no infringe los derechos de PI de IBM.

    En 1999, el equipo de proyectos de programas informáticos de código abierto de Hercules creó el “emulador” Hercules. Esta tecnología usa las instrucciones de IBM, las traduce e interpreta para que los programas y las aplicaciones de clientes de IBM puedan ejecutarse en plataformas de gran sistema (mainframe) que no sean IBM, tales como un servidor Microsoft integrado en una tecnología de procesador Intel, según lo explica Ted Henneberry, abogado estadounidense de TurboHercules SAS, la entidad comercial con sede en Francia que intenta comercializar Hercules, y autor de la reclamación basada en disposiciones antimonopolio.

    TurboHercules fue fundada en 2009 por Roger Bowler, el creador de Hercules. Poco después de la creación de la empresa, Bowler envió a IBM una carta [pdf en inglés] fechada en julio de 2009, en la cual explica que la empresa intenta “establecer una empresa comercial que ofrezca a los clientes una opción de plataformas compatibles con un gran sistema (mainframe) y contribuir, al mismo tiempo, a la salud de largo plazo del ecosistema del gran sistema de IBM”. TurboHercules propuso poner a disposición de los clientes del gran sistema de IBM una licencia para sistemas operativos de IBM en la plataforma TurboHercules, y permitir que IBM fijara el precio de dicha licencia “en términos justos y razonables”.

    Un gran sistema (mainframe) es una arquitectura informática particularmente apta para administrar grandes lotes de procesamiento de datos. Puede usarse para operar transacciones de tarjetas de crédito bancarias o sistemas de reservas de aerolíneas.

    IBM respondió [pdf en inglés] en noviembre, rechazó el ofrecimiento y dijo que “imitar el sistema de propiedad de IBM” requiere de la propiedad intelectual de la empresa. “Ustedes entenderán que no era razonable pedir que IBM considerara conceder una licencia para que su sistema operativo pudiera usarse en plataformas infractoras”, observó IBM en la carta del 4 de noviembre publicada en el sitio web de TurboHercules.

    Según su respuesta [pdf en inglés] del 18 de noviembre a IBM, TurboHercules manifestó su sorpresa ante la mención de IBM acerca de la violación de los derechos de PI y la falta de apoyo al código abierto, y señaló que dicha postura se apartaba de la postura previa del líder mundial y de la promesa de 2005 [pdf en inglés] de no hacer valer los derechos de 500 de sus patentes contra el código abierto.

    En marzo de 2010, IBM finalmente respondió [pdf en inglés] que tenía “preocupaciones sustanciales por la infracción de la tecnología patentada de IBM”, que la empresa había invertido “muchos años y muchos millones de dólares en el desarrollo” de su tecnología y que “se sabía bien que IBM era titular de muchos derechos de propiedad intelectual en esta esfera”. En esta carta, IBM proporcionó una lista de patentes que podrían ser infringidas por Hercules. Según Bowler, por lo menos, dos de esas patentes son parte de la promesa de 2005 de IBM.

    “Hercules existió durante más de diez años sin que IBM hiciera ninguna reclamación de que Hercules infringiera ninguna propiedad intelectual de IBM, e IBM dedicó un capítulo en uno de sus libros blancos a Hercules antes de borrar en silencio ese capítulo hace varios años”, dijo Bowler en una declaración enviada a Intellectual Property Watch.

    Acusación antimonopolio contra IBM

    El 23 de marzo, TurboHercules presentó una demanda formal contra IBM ante la Dirección General de Competencia de la Comisión Europea en Bruselas, según un comunicado de prensa. En la demanda se alegaba que IBM tiene un “monopolio del 100% en el mercado de sistemas operativos de gran sistema (mainframe)” y está intentando abusar de esta posición monopolística para denegar a los clientes la posibilidad de ejecutar un sistema operativo de IBM en cualquier otro medio que no sea hardware de gran sistema de IBM, en lo que el demandante describe como “ilegalmente vinculante”.

    La Dirección de la Comisión solicitará una respuesta de IBM y, luego de analizarla en función de reclamaciones anteriores de la misma naturaleza, decidirá si la reclamación justifica un procedimiento formal, según Henneberry.

    Según TurboHercules, además, IBM, que en el pasado tenía una política de publicar información de interoperabilidad para sus sistemas operativos de gran sistema (mainframe), recientemente introdujo nuevas características que dependen de interfaces no documentadas entre el sistema operativo z del sistema de IBM (z/OS) y el gran sistema (mainframe) de IBM. Ello impide que la comunidad de código abierto “mantenga una plena compatibilidad entre Hercules y el sistema operativo de gran sistema de IBM”, según se desprende del comunicado.

    En la reclamación fundada en disposiciones antimonopolio, se pide a la Comisión Europea que solicite a IBM que conceda una licencia por el uso de sus sistemas operativos de gran sistema (mainframe) independientemente del hardware de gran sistema, y solicite a IBM que continúe publicando las especificaciones técnicas de las interfaces z/OS y protocolos, o que conceda una licencia por el uso de esas interfaces o protocolos a TurboHercules.

    En un comunicado de prensa del 6 de abril, Bowler afirmó que la decisión de adoptar medidas contra IBM se había tomado con reticencia. “No pedimos que se someta a IBM a multas punitivas”, sino “simplemente queremos que IBM acepte que clientes que pagan legítimamente su sistema operativo de gran sistema (mainframe) z/OS puedan implementar ese programa informático en las plataformas de hardware de su elección”.

    Hercules “no es un bolso Gucci falso”, señaló Bowler, “es un emulador basado en un programa informático de código abierto de un tercero desarrollado de buena fe con documentación publicada por IBM sobre su arquitectura z”.

    ¿Los FOSS en riesgo?

    Para Florian Mueller, desarrollador de programas informáticos y fundador de la campaña NoSoftwarePatents de 2004, las patentes que, según IBM, Hercules infringe podrían amenazar otros proyectos claves de programas informáticos de código abierto gratuitos (FOSS), tales como MySQL, VirtualBox y SQLite.
    Mueller publicó en el sitio web de FOSS la lista de patentes que podrían poner en peligro proyectos de código abierto. Según Mueller, “el ataque de IBM contra Hercules es un ataque a la interoperabilidad y a la innovación de FOSS en general”. Mueller pide una intervención normativa.

    IBM reafirma la promesa al código abierto

    IBM reafirmó su promesa a la comunidad de código abierto en una declaración enviada a Intellectual Property Watch. La empresa manifestó que ha “invertido miles de millones de dólares a lo largo de los años como parte de su compromiso con esta comunidad”.

    “Si TurboHercules es miembro calificado de la comunidad de código abierto y cumple con las disposiciones de la promesa, IBM no haría valer ningún derecho legal a las dos patentes prometidas contra TurboHercules”, dijo en la declaración. “Sin embargo, dado que muy poco se sabe de TurboHercules, depende de esa empresa establecer cuáles son sus calificaciones para integrar la comunidad de código abierto”.

    “Además”, afirmó IBM, “hay muchas otras patentes, de las cuales hemos notificado a TurboHercules, que el emulador de TurboHercules puede infringir. Ese fue precisamente el objetivo de nuestra carta: notificar a TurboHercules de nuestra propiedad intelectual para que pudieran realizar el análisis correspondiente. Estamos esperando ese análisis”.

    Según Henneberry, TurboHercules desearía que la Comisión Europea volviera a decretos previos, tales como el decreto europeo conocido como el Compromiso de 1984 (“1984 Undertaking”) [corregido] entre la Comisión Europea e IBM. “IBM acordó que la Comisión investigaría las mismas prácticas por las cuales TurboHercules presenta su reclamación. Conforme al acuerdo, IBM debía publicar protocolos de interfaz y otros datos técnicos que permitieran que plataformas de hardware que no fueran IBM pudieran ser usadas por los clientes con el sistema operativo de IBM; en otras palabras, impedía que IBM vinculara su sistema operativo a su propia plataforma de hardware.

    IBM conservaba el derecho de retirarse del Compromiso con aviso previo, el cual dio a fines de la década de 1990. En ese momento, la Comisión afirmó que continuaría supervisando el mercado”, señaló a Intellectual Property Watch. “Un decreto judicial similar también estaba en vigencia en los EE. UU., pero quedó sin efecto en 2001”.

    Ha surgido un debate en el seno de la comunidad de código abierto gratuito sobre el estado de TurboHercules como una empresa de código abierto. Pueden encontrarse ejemplos de dicho debate aquí.

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.205.179.23