SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • The EU or the US are not the banana states for whi... »
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Accès aux médicaments : création d’un groupe de travail chargé de contrôler les accords de libre échange conclus par l’Union européenne

    Published on 2 February 2010 @ 12:00 pm

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    BRUXELLES – Les accords de commerce ne doivent pas contenir de clauses relatives aux droits de propriété intellectuelle susceptibles de remettre en cause l’accès des pays pauvres aux médicaments à des prix abordables, a déclaré un député chevronné du Parlement européen.

    David Martin, membre du parti travailliste écossais et député du Parlement européen depuis 1984, a exprimé son inquiétude vis-à-vis de l’accord de libre échange que l’Union européenne négocie actuellement avec l’Inde. Des projets de l’accord rendus publics par la Commission européenne, l’organe exécutif de l’Union européenne, montrent que celui-ci contient des dispositions concernant la propriété intellectuelle d’une portée considérable. Y figure notamment une clause d’exclusivité des données qui permettra aux principales entreprises pharmaceutiques d’empêcher pendant plusieurs années les industries indiennes de médicaments génériques d’utiliser les formules à partir desquelles les nouveaux médicaments sont fabriqués.

    L’Inde étant l’un des principaux exportateurs de médicaments génériques à faible coût vers les pays en développement, ces clauses pourraient avoir des répercussions dans d’autres pays, selon David Martin. « Ce n’est pas seulement une mauvaise nouvelle pour l’Inde », a-t-il indiqué. «C’est une mauvaise nouvelle pour tous les pays que l’Inde fournit en médicaments génériques.»

    David Martin est le président du groupe de travail du Parlement sur l’innovation, l’accès aux médicaments et les maladies liées à la pauvreté qui a été créé le 27 janvier à Bruxelles. Ce groupe de travail multipartite a pour mission de contrôler l’étendue des financements accordés par l’Union européenne pour les traitements des maladies qui touchent principalement les pays pauvres et d’examiner les questions liées aux brevets de médicaments.

    L’une des priorités du groupe concerne les problèmes de saisies par les autorités douanières de médicaments génériques. Au cours de l’année 2008 et en 2009, plusieurs incidents ont eu lieu aux Pays-Bas où les services des douanes ont bloqué des médicaments génériques en transit, à la demande d’entreprises pharmaceutiques selon certaines sources, au motif que ceux-ci avaient été fabriqués en violation des droits de propriété intellectuelle. «L’objectif était visiblement de porter un coup au commerce des médicaments génériques », a précisé David Martin, qui a insisté sur le fait que les saisies portaient sur des médicaments parfaitement légaux.

    L’organisation humanitaire Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) sera chargée d’organiser les nouvelles activités du groupe de travail.

    Tido von Schoen-Angerer, directeur de la campagne de Médecins sans frontières sur l’accès aux médicaments, a indiqué que le groupe de travail essaierait de faire contrepoids afin de limiter l’influence de l’industrie pharmaceutique sur les institutions européennes. Cette influence se fait particulièrement sentir dans le cadre des négociations de l’accord de commerce avec l’Inde, a-t-il ajouté, relayant la crainte que l’introduction en Inde de règles strictes en matière de brevets ne contribue à renchérir le prix des médicaments génériques utilisés par MSF dans ses programmes d’aide d’urgence.

    « L’Inde est la pharmacie des pays en développement », a-t-il rappelé. «C’est l’un des marchés émergents dont l’industrie pharmaceutique aimerait s’emparer. On imagine sans peine l’impact que les mesures touchant les exportateurs indiens de médicaments pourrait avoir sur l’ensemble des pays en développement. »

    Lancées en 2007, les discussions entre l’Union européenne et l’Inde n’ont pas débouché sur des résultats concrets jusqu’à présent. À l’occasion de la rencontre entre le Premier ministre indien Manmohan Singh et les représentants de l’Union européenne, en novembre de l’année dernière, les deux parties n’en n’ont pas moins exprimé le souhait de poursuivre les discussions. Un accord pourrait intervenir dans le courant de l’année 2010, selon Manmohan Singh.

    Interrogée sur les critiques exprimées à l’égard de la politique commerciale de la Commission européenne, sa porte-parole n’a pas souhaité faire de commentaires.

    D’après Jon Pender, directeur des affaires économiques et gouvernementales de l’entreprise pharmaceutique GlaxoSmithKline, «un équilibre doit être trouvé» entre la protection des droits intellectuels et la possibilité pour les pays en développement de pouvoir accéder à des médicaments abordables. Tout en soutenant que les brevets «jouent un rôle important» en matière d’innovation et favorisent le développement de nouveaux traitements, il a indiqué que son entreprise était « tout à fait prête » à explorer de nouvelles approches en matière de réglementation des innovations médicales.

    Il a également estimé que les saisies de médicaments génériques qui avaient été opérées étaient « très regrettables » et nié le fait que l’industrie pharmaceutique ait tenté de persuader les autorités douanières de considérer les médicaments génériques au même titre que des médicaments contrefaits. «Nous sommes très clairs sur le fait que nous voulons éviter la confusion entre médicaments génériques et médicaments contrefaits », a-t-il assuré. «Nous ne voulons pas que les gens aient l’impression que l’industrie pharmaceutique tente de brouiller les cartes. »

    Paul Thorn, un militant des droits des patients, séropositif depuis plus de 20 ans, considère que l’influence que les lobbyistes de l’industrie pharmaceutique exercent sur les institutions européennes est « un peu perverse ». Si l’opinion publique fait suffisamment pression, elle pourra convaincre les dirigeants politiques de se soucier davantage de ce qui est bon pour la population en matière de santé que des profits des entreprises pharmaceutiques. « À ce moment-là, peut-être que les choses changeront », a-t-il lancé. « Nous devons simplement faire en sorte de ne pas relâcher la pression. »

    David Cronin may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.235.36.164