SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Analysis: Monkey In The Middle Of Selfie Copyright Dispute

The recent case of a monkey selfie that went viral on the web raised thorny issues of ownership between a (human) photographer and Wikimedia. Two attorneys from Morrison & Foerster sort out the relevant copyright law.


Latest Comments
  • are you aware that within the photographic industr... »
  • A VPN is a virtual private network, which generall... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Les délégués espèrent trouver un consensus sur la coordination du Plan d’action pour le développement en avril

    Published on 25 November 2009 @ 10:54 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    Lors de négociations informelles tenues vendredi dernier dans la matinée, le Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle semble s’être approché d’un consensus sur le mécanisme de coordination du Plan d’action pour le développement. Cependant, l’après-midi même, les gouvernements ont été incapables de surmonter les divergences qui subsistaient.

    Selon certains participants, il faudra attendre la prochaine réunion du Comité en avril 2010 pour venir à bout des désaccords persistants, thème qui constituera le premier point clé de l’ordre du jour. À l’issue des sessions de négociation informelles, un document de compilation des deux propositions sur la coordination a été rédigé, montrant les divergences de positions. Ce document, qui sera examiné lors de la prochaine réunion, est consultable ici [pdf] (en anglais).

    À la fin de la réunion, les délégués se sont mis d’accord sur une proposition de projet [pdf] modifié du Plan d’action pour le développement sur la propriété intellectuelle et le domaine public, bien que certains éléments restent à examiner en avril. Selon des participants, les projets relatifs à l’amélioration du cadre de gestion axée sur les résultats [pdf] mis en œuvre par l’Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle (OMPI) aux fins du suivi et de l’évaluation des activités de développement et à la politique en matière de concurrence [pdf] ont également été approuvés. Par ailleurs, l’élection d’un nouveau président se tiendra également en avril. Le Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle s’est réuni du 16 au 20 novembre.

    Un sentiment d’optimisme malgré le report des discussions

    C’est un sentiment d’optimisme plutôt que de frustration qui a marqué la fin de la réunion, les délégués ayant déclaré qu’ils cheminaient vers une meilleure compréhension de la position de chacun concernant le mécanisme de coordination.

    « Heureusement, la diplomatie s’introduit à l’OMPI… nous nous écoutons mutuellement », s’est réjoui un participant, avant d’ajouter que les discussions avaient été beaucoup plus professionnelles, et par conséquent beaucoup plus fructueuses, que lors des sessions précédentes.

    D’autres participants ont exprimé des points de vue similaires. « Nous savons qui pense quoi. Nous nous sommes compris », a expliqué Alexandra Grazioli, conseillère juridique en chef à l’Institut fédéral suisse de la propriété intellectuelle et présidente du groupe B des pays développés. « À présent, il s’agit de trouver la bonne formulation».

    Travailler à l’élaboration d’un mécanisme de coordination

    Deux propositions ont été formulées au début de la semaine : la première par l’Algérie, le Brésil et le Pakistan (qui a par la suite reçu le soutien officiel de l’Inde et d’une coalition de pays en développement partageant la même vision) et la seconde par le groupe B.

    La première proposition suggérait au départ l’organisation de sessions spéciales, lors desquelles les rapports de tous les comités de l’OMPI sur les activités liées au développement seraient examinés. Dans sa proposition d’origine, le groupe B soutenait que les sessions existantes du Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle permettaient tout à fait de gérer ce processus et que les comités de l’OMPI devraient rendre leurs rapports à l’Assemblée générale et non au Comité du développement pour éviter de rompre l’équilibre entre les différents comités de l’organisation.

    Lors des sessions informelles d’hier au soir aucun texte unifié n’a été approuvé, mais les différentes positions ont été exprimées de manière suffisamment claire pour que les délégués puissent entrevoir une issue, ont affirmé certains participants.

    Le 20 novembre, Intellectual Property Watch a pu avoir accès à deux propositions révisées émanant de chacun des camps opposés avant le commencement des sessions informelles de l’après-midi. Ces propositions semblaient indiquer que des efforts avaient été faits pour trouver un terrain d’entente, lesquels se sont finalement avérés insuffisants pour tomber d’accord lors de cette session.

    D’après des projets de textes informels qu’Intellectual Property Watch a pu se procurer, les délégués ont tendu vers un consensus pour que la question des activités de suivi, d’analyse et d’évaluation du Comité du développement soit le premier point clé de l’ordre du jour des sessions ordinaires du Comité, et afin que le temps accordé pour traiter cette question soit suffisant. Néanmoins, les propositions présentaient quelques dissemblances.

    Le texte modifié du groupe B proposait d’autoriser, si nécessaire, la prolongation « exceptionnelle » des sessions du Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle. De son côté, la proposition modifiée de l’autre groupe suggérait que la possibilité d’étendre la durée des sessions ne soit envisagée que si les progrès réalisés restaient insuffisants après deux jours de négociations.

    Il était question dans les deux propositions d’inclure un chapitre sur le développement au rapport que l’OMPI soumet annuellement à l’Organisation des Nations Unies (ONU), comme le prévoit l’accord entre les deux organisations. Par ailleurs, les choses ont avancé concernant la gestion des rapports des autres comités.

    Dans sa proposition révisée, le groupe B demande que le Comité du développement s’engage à organiser un examen indépendant des recommandations du Plan d’action pour le développement, ce qui n’était pas évoqué dans sa proposition d’origine. L’autre groupe, quant à lui, demande que les rapports des différents comités de l’OMPI soient envoyés aux Assemblées générales (puis que ces dernières les transmettent au Comité du développement pour examen), ce qui semble avoir pour objectif de dissiper les craintes du groupe B au sujet d’une éventuelle rupture d’équilibre entre les comités.

    Malgré tout, le désaccord subsiste sur la question de demander à tous les organes de l’OMPI de s’engager dans les projets liés au Plan d’action pour le développement et de rédiger des rapports sur lesdits projets, ou uniquement aux organes ayant un rapport direct avec le sujet.

    La question de l’éventuel rôle que pourrait jouer le Comité d’audit de l’OMPI en garantissant la mise en œuvre des recommandations a également été abordée. Un groupe de pays en développement partisans de la proposition de l’Algérie, du Brésil et du Pakistan souhaiterait que cette question soit étudiée, mais les pays en développement ont le sentiment que ce rôle ne correspondrait pas au mandat du Comité d’audit.

    La propriété intellectuelle et le domaine public

    Le projet relatif à la propriété intellectuelle et au domaine public, qui a pour but d’approfondir l’analyse des conséquences et des avantages d’un domaine public « riche et accessible », et de promouvoir les activités d’établissement de normes, se penche sur quatre éléments : le droit d’auteur et les droits connexes, les marques, les brevets, et les savoirs traditionnels et expressions culturelles traditionnelles. Une version mise à jour du projet (qui n’est pas la version finale) montrant différentes modifications apportées est consultable ici [pdf] (en anglais).

    Cette semaine, les références aux savoirs traditionnels et expressions culturelles traditionnelles ont notamment été supprimées et du contenu a été ajouté dans la partie sur le droit d’auteur. Selon des sources, la proposition de la Bolivie, qui consistait à inclure à la section sur les brevets une analyse des notions d’enchevêtrement et de « renouvellement perpétuel » des brevets (qui consiste à étendre la protection d’une création en modifiant légèrement un élément d’un brevet existant) n’a pas été acceptée, principalement en raison d’une objection de la part des États-Unis. Cette question sera à nouveau examinée en avril.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Griselda Jung

    Kaitlin Mara may be reached at kmara@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     

    Comments

    1. Lucien David LANGMAN says:

      Bonjour à tous,

      “le Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle”

      Voici une bonne un grand Comité qui discute d’une coordination…entre initiés. Mais où sont donc les femmes et hommes de terrain, sont qui se frottent jour après jour aux problèmes en tant réel, ceux qui firent faire un énorme bond, une véritable avancée en avant dans les 1993-2002.

      Disparus pour laisser la place à d’autres ayant du temps libre pour un certain nombre, cabinets, bureaux n’ont jamais remplacés la pratique et les situations de la vie.

      Ces 2 mondes avaient su travailler ensemble, avec succès chacun apportant leurs savoirs faire, leurs expériences, seuls ingrédients pour obtenir une bonne mayonaise.


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.196.206.17