SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Assemblées de l’OMPI : le sort des savoirs traditionnels en jeu

    Published on 28 September 2009 @ 8:39 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    L’Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle doit être en mesure d’édicter des règles à la fois pour les dernières avancées technologiques et pour les systèmes de connaissances traditionnelles si elle entend conserver son rôle dans le domaine de l’établissement des normes, a indiqué son directeur général, Francis Gurry, dans la déclaration qu’il a prononcée à l’occasion de l’ouverture des Assemblées générales de l’Organisation.

    «Le programme de travail de l’Organisation dans le domaine de l’établissement des normes ne progresse pas », a-t-il ajouté. «Des blocages existent dans plusieurs domaines, ce qui entraîne des risques majeurs pour l’Organisation. » Il a cité deux questions en particulier, celle de la protection des savoirs traditionnels et des expressions culturelles traditionnelles et celle de l’avenir du droit d’auteur dans l’environnement numérique.

    Parmi les autres thèmes à l’ordre du jour des Assemblées générales des États membres de l’OMPI, qui se tiendront du 22 septembre au 1er octobre, figurent l’approbation d’un programme de travail pour l’amélioration du fonctionnement du Traité de coopération en matière de brevets et l’engagement de l’OMPI dans les questions de politique au niveau mondial, telles que le changement climatique.

    Les Assemblées devront également se prononcer sur les recommandations formulées par le Comité du programme et budget concernant l’octroi d’une dotation supplémentaire pour la mise en œuvre du Plan d’action pour le développement 2007, la composition du Comité d’audit et la construction d’une nouvelle salle de conférence.

    Le mandat des principaux comités de l’Organisation est défini lors des Assemblées générales de l’OMP. Leurs principales conclusions et recommandations sont examinées et débattues pendant la réunion. Les deux premières journées sont consacrées pour la première fois aux déclarations présentées par les ministres de 40 pays en développement pour la plupart réunis dans le cadre d’une rencontre de haut niveau.

    Ces Assemblées annuelles marquent une première pour le nouveau Directeur général, Francis Gurry, qui a présenté, dans sa déclaration d’ouverture, les initiatives mises en œuvre afin de renforcer les mécanismes de responsabilité au sein de l’Organisation.

    Savoirs traditionnels, droits d’auteur, brevets et défis liés au changement climatique

    L’une des principales questions qui sera examinée par les Assemblées de l’OMPI cette semaine concerne l’avenir du Comité intergouvernemental sur la propriété intellectuelle et les ressources génétiques, les savoirs traditionnels et le folklore (IGC) dont les membres ne sont pas parvenus à trouver un accord au cours de l’année.

    La dernière réunion du Comité, qui s’est tenue du 29 juin au 3 juillet, s’est soldée par un nouvel échec après celui enregistré lors de la réunion organisée du 13 au 17 octobre.

    De nombreux pays en développement insistent pour que les négociations entamées dans le cadre du Comité, qui durent depuis une dizaine d’année, débouchent sur l’adoption d’un traité protégeant ces droits de propriété intellectuelle. Le Groupe africain, entre autres, souhaite l’instauration d’un instrument international juridiquement contraignant. D’autres, en particulier le Groupe B, celui des pays développés, estiment qu’il n’est pas judicieux de se prononcer sur l’objectif à atteindre avant d’avoir entamé des négociations.

    Personne ne sait vraiment ce que les Assemblées, qui se prononcent habituellement sur la base des recommandations formulées par les Comités, feront de cette absence de recommandations. Francis Gurry a demandé aux délégués de faire preuve de flexibilité et de faire en sorte que les discussions puissent se poursuivre au sein du Comité de manière à ne pas donner l’impression aux pays en développement qu’aucune solution internationale ne peut être trouvée concernant la protection de ces droits.

    Le Directeur général de l’Organisation a également appelé à la vigilance en ce qui concerne le téléchargement de contenus depuis l’Internet où le taux de piratage atteint 95 pour cent, a-t-il précisé, et un « nouveau seuil a été franchi en matière de non-respect de la propriété intellectuelle. » C’est un défi mondial, a-t-il ajouté, dans la mesure où nous assistons à une migration sur Internet de toutes les formes ou presque de culture et à l’émergence de nouveaux types de contenus créés par les utilisateurs.

    Francis Gurry a mis en évidence l’importance du Traité de coopération en matière de brevets pour l’OMPI. Il a assuré aux Etats membres que l’élaboration d’un programme de travail visant à améliorer le Traité ne relevait pas de l’établissement de normes et ne constituait en aucun cas une remise en cause de leur souveraineté.

    Il a également salué le travail accompli par les Assemblées générales des Nations Unies, qui se déroulent à New York, où aujourd’hui est discuté de la question du changement climatique. Ce sujet est également un qui nécessite l’attention de la communauté de la propriété intellectuelle, a invoqué Francis Gurry.

    «D’aucuns ont le sentiment que la propriété intellectuelle exerce une influence négative sur l’éventail des mesures politiques indispensables pour faire face au problème du changement climatique », a-t-il indiqué. Mais compte tenu de l’évolution nécessaire de l’infrastructure de l’économie, il est difficile d’imaginer comment un droit de propriété sur tel ou tel élément technologique pourrait constituer un obstacle. Au contraire, la propriété intellectuelle peut stimuler l’innovation écologique dont nous avons besoin, a-t-il ajouté.

    Résultats positifs pour 2008-2009; perspectives plus sombres pour le prochain exercice biennal

    Malgré la crise économique, l’OMPI espère clôturer l’exercice biennal sur une « note positive », a indiqué Francis Gurry à l’occasion des Assemblées générales. Mais le prochain exercice sera plus difficile, les projections faisant état d’une baisse des recettes de 1,6 pour cent. Une nouvelle augmentation est attendue pour la seconde moitié de l’année 2010, a-t-il précisé.

    Le budget proposé pour l’exercice biennal 2010-2011 a été approuvé par le Comité du programme et budget la semaine dernière qui a recommandé d’allouer la majorité des ressources non affectées aux projets du Plan d’action pour le développement. Le résumé des recommandations formulées par le Comité est disponible ici [pdf].

    Le problème, selon certains participants, est que ces ressources ont été allouées à des projets qui n’ont pas encore été approuvés. Le Comité du développement et de la propriété intellectuelle (CDIP) s’est réuni en novembre, puis en Avril, mais la prochaine réunion budgétaire n’aura pas lieu avant juillet, ce qui a amené de nombreux pays en développement à se demander comment des projets approuvés en novembre pouvaient être mis en œuvre rapidement alors même qu’ils ne disposent pas des ressources budgétaires nécessaires.

    D’autres pays, principalement des pays du Groupe B, ont estimé qu’il était contraire à la procédure d’allouer des fonds pour des projets non encore aboutis et ont insisté sur la nécessité de discuter de tous les détails des projets avant de décider d’allouer un financement pour leur mise en œuvre.

    Certains pays en développement ont cependant souligné que le budget du système du Traité de coopération en matière de brevets comprenait une ligne « Autres » sous la rubrique « Services contractuels » et que si cela était autorisé, il n’y avait pas de raison que des fonds ne puissent également être alloués pour financer des projets de développement.

    Au final, 2,3 millions de francs de ressources non affectées (qui servent à financer les dépenses non prévues) ont été provisoirement allouées au financement des coûts démarrage des projets du Plan d’action pour le développement qui seront discutés en novembre. Selon des sources, cette somme s’ajoute au 2,24 millions de francs affectés aux activités approuvées par le CDIP en avril 2009 (qui étaient inscrits au budget provisoire examiné par le PBC la semaine dernière). Un montant de CHF 100°000 a également été alloué à des projets du Plan d’action pour le développement et à la coordination, ce qui signifie que 5,64 millions de francs sur les 6,996 millions de ressources non affectées serviront à financer des plans de développement.

    La crise financière a été au centre de la réunion du Comité du programme et budget, qui a eu lieu du 14 au 16 septembre, l’OMPI se préparant à se serrer la ceinture en prévision d’une baisse de ses revenus dans l’année à venir. « L’impact de la crise financière et économique risque de se faire sentir plus fortement à l’OMPI, une organisation dont 90 pour cent du budget est tiré des droits acquittés par le secteur privé, que dans toute autre organisation du système des Nations Unies», a admis Francis Gurry dans son introduction aux questions concernant le budget.

    Groupe de travail du Comité d’audit, Construction du centre de conférence

    De larges discussions ont également eu lieu lors de la réunion du Comité du programme et budget concernant la composition du Comité d’audit de l’OMPI, les pays en développement demandant à ce qu’il soit composé de neuf membres contrairement aux pays développés qui souhaitaient que sa composition soit limitée à cinq membres. Un groupe de travail a été constitué afin d’examiner le mandat du Comité ainsi que sa composition ; ses recommandations seront soumises au Comité du programme et budget en 2010.

    La demande formulée par l’OMPI concernant la construction d’un nouveau centre de conférence n’a pas obtenu le feu vert des pays, mais n’en a pas pour autant été totalement rejetée. La France et l’Espagne ont estimé qu’il n’était pas très sage d’investir 64,2 millions de francs suisses dans ce projet alors même que l’OMPI était en train de réduire ses coûts, ont indiqué plusieurs sources. Le Comité du programme et budget a convenu de « prendre note » des propositions concernant le centre de conférence et du calendrier proposé et d’examiner la possibilité de prévoir des fonds supplémentaires (sans toutefois préciser quand cet examen aurait lieu).

    Avec le concours de William New.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Véronique Sauron

    Kaitlin Mara may be reached at kmara@ip-watch.ch.

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 157.55.39.78