SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »
  • 'Business methods were generally not patentable in... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    El destino de los conocimientos tradicionales: una decisión clave en las Asambleas de la OMPI

    Published on 25 September 2009 @ 8:57 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    La Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual (OMPI) debe tener la capacidad de fijar normas para la innovación, desde los avances de la tecnología más recientes hasta los sistemas de conocimientos tradicionales, si desea conservar su reconocimiento en la formulación de políticas, expresó hoy el Director General en la apertura de la Asamblea General anual del organismo de las Naciones Unidas.

    “En el terreno de la actividad normativa, la labor no está avanzando”, afirmó Francis Gurry en su discurso de apertura. “Hay bloqueos en varios ámbitos” que generan “graves riesgos para la Organización”. Hizo referencia a dos áreas en particular: la protección de los conocimientos tradicionales y de las expresiones culturales tradicionales, y el futuro del derecho de autor en el entorno digital.

    Otros puntos clave de las Asambleas de los Estados miembros de la OMPI, que se celebran del 22 de septiembre al 1 de octubre, incluyen la aprobación de un plan de trabajo sobre cuestiones relacionadas con las patentes y la función de la OMPI en cuestiones mundiales, como el cambio climático.

    Por otro lado, la semana pasada el Comité del Programa y Presupuesto de la OMPI aprobó fondos adicionales para la aplicación del Programa para el Desarrollo de 2007, cuestionó la composición del Comité de Auditoría y debatió la posibilidad de construir un nuevo centro de conferencias de la OMPI.

    En las reuniones anuales se dictan los mandatos para la labor de la OMPI. Las recomendaciones y los resultados clave de varios de los comités más controlados de la OMPI se revisan y se deciden durante las sesiones. Los primeros dos días se dedican a una primera reunión ministerial en la que participan más de 40 ministros principalmente de países en desarrollo, quienes pronuncian sus respectivos discursos.

    Las Asambleas de este año constituyen las primeras en las que Gurry se desempeña como Director General, y en su discurso de apertura describió las iniciativas en curso destinadas a incrementar la responsabilidad en la Organización.

    Conocimientos tradicionales, derecho de autor, patentes y el problema del cambio climático

    Una decisión clave del programa de la OMPI de esta semana es el futuro de su comité encargado de la protección de los conocimientos tradicionales y los recursos genéticos, sobre el cual no se pudo llegar a un acuerdo el año pasado.

    El Comité Intergubernamental sobre Propiedad Intelectual y Recursos Genéticos, Conocimientos Tradicionales y Folclore (CIG) no pudo lograr un acuerdo en su último período de sesiones, del 29 de junio al 3 de julio, lo cual reflejó el fracaso previo en las negociaciones entabladas del 13 al 17 de octubre de 2008.

    Muchos países en desarrollo insisten en que las reuniones del Comité creado hace una década deben avanzar en torno a la negociación de un tratado relativo a la protección de este tipo de derechos de propiedad intelectual. El Grupo Africano, entre otras partes, solicitó que se delibere sobre un instrumento internacional que sea jurídicamente vinculante. Otros, principalmente el Grupo B de países desarrollados, opinaron que era poco prudente establecer una meta antes de dar comienzo a las negociaciones.

    No queda claro qué hará la Asamblea General respecto del texto sobre el cual no se ha llegado a un acuerdo; normalmente, las asambleas adoptan decisiones conforme a las recomendaciones de los comités. Gurry solicitó a los delegados que demostraran flexibilidad y posibilitaran la continuidad del trabajo del Comité de modo que los países en desarrollo puedan esperar que se hallen soluciones internacionales en materia de protección en un futuro próximo.

    El Director General también pidió que se prestara atención a la descarga de contenido de Internet, donde, según indicó, reina un índice de piratería del 95% y un “nivel de indiferencia por la propiedad intelectual que no tiene precedentes”. Este es un desafío mundial, agregó, dado que la mayoría de las formas de expresión cultural, o quizá todas, están migrando a Internet y están surgiendo nuevas formas de contenidos generados por los usuarios.

    Gurry destacó la importancia que reviste para la OMPI el Tratado de Cooperación en materia de Patentes (PCT). Aseguró a los miembros que una “hoja de ruta” para futuras mejoras del tratado “no es un ejercicio normativo” y que el PCT no afecta en modo alguno la soberanía de los Estados miembros.

    Gurry también hizo alusión a la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, llevada a cabo simultáneamente pero en Nueva York, donde hoy se delibera sobre el problema del cambio climático. Este tema también merece la atención de la comunidad de la propiedad intelectual, sostuvo Gurry.

    “Existe la idea de que la propiedad intelectual puede ejercer una influencia negativa en el ámbito de iniciativas de política necesarias para abordar el problema del cambio climático”, afirmó. Pero dados los cambios necesarios en toda la infraestructura de la economía mundial, es difícil imaginar que los derechos de propiedad intelectual de una tecnología particular podrían plantear un obstáculo. Por el contrario, puede considerarse como un “estímulo sistémico” para el tipo de innovación ecológica que necesitamos, indicó.

    La OMPI considera positivos los ingresos para 2008-2009; próximo bienio con más dificultades

    A pesar de la crisis económica, la OMPI espera finalizar el actual bienio con “optimismo financiero”, dijo Gurry a la Asamblea hoy. Pero el período siguiente será más difícil, habida cuenta de la disminución prevista del 1,6% en los ingresos. Se espera que los ingresos comiencen a reactivarse en la segunda mitad de 2010, señaló.

    El presupuesto provisional para el bienio 2010-2011 fue aprobado por el Comité del Programa y Presupuesto la semana pasada, y la mayoría de los recursos no asignados de la OMPI se destinaron a proyectos del Programa para el Desarrollo. El resumen de las recomendaciones de dicho Comité están disponibles aquí [pdf].

    El asunto en discusión era de qué modo destinar recursos para los proyectos aún no acordados del Programa para el Desarrollo, según los participantes. El Comité sobre Desarrollo y Propiedad Intelectual (CDIP) se reúne en noviembre y nuevamente en abril, pero la siguiente reunión en materia de presupuesto se celebrará recién en julio. Por ello, muchos países en desarrollo plantearon el interrogante de cómo los proyectos acordados en noviembre podrían comenzar a aplicarse oportunamente, sin contar con los recursos presupuestarios para financiar tal aplicación.

    Sin embargo, otros países, principalmente del Grupo B de países desarrollados, expresaron su preocupación porque esa asignación de fondos a proyectos aún poco claros fuera improcedente, y alegaron que los detalles de los proyectos debían ultimarse antes de que los fondos se otorgaran para su aplicación.

    Algunos países en desarrollo indicaron que el sistema del Tratado de Cooperación en materia de Patentes tenía una partida presupuestaria de 44 millones de francos suizos destinados a la sección “Otros” en Servicios contractuales. Si esto, afirmaron, no era improcedente, la asignación de dinero para financiar proyectos de desarrollo también debía permitirse.

    Finalmente, 2,3 millones de francos suizos de la porción no asignada del presupuesto (reservada para gastos imprevistos durante el año) se destinaron provisionalmente a los costos iniciales de proyectos del Programa para el Desarrollo que se discutirán en noviembre. Esa cifra se añade a los 2.240.000 millones de francos suizos destinados a actividades acordadas por el CDIP en abril de 2009 (lo cual formaba parte del presupuesto provisional asignado al Comité del Programa y Presupuesto la semana pasada), según trascendió. Asimismo, una cantidad complementaria de 100 mil francos suizos se destinó a la coordinación y a proyectos del Programa para el Desarrollo, lo cual significa que un total de 5.640.000 millones de francos suizos de los 6.996.000 millones de francos suizos de fondos no asignados ahora están destinados a fines de desarrollo.

    La crisis financiera se abordó en el Comité del Programa y Presupuesto, que se reunió del 14 al 16 de septiembre, dado que la OMPI se prepara para ajustarse el cinturón en vista de la reducción de ingresos en el próximo año fiscal. “Es probable que la OMPI, organización que obtiene más del 90% de su financiación de las tasas que cobra por los servicios que presta al sector privado, sienta más agudamente que ninguna otra organización del Sistema de las Naciones Unidas la repercusión de la crisis económica y financiera”, señaló Gurry en el párrafo introductorio al presupuesto.

    Grupo de Trabajo del Comité de Auditoría, construcción del centro de conferencias

    En el Comité del Programa y Presupuesto (PBC), también se deliberó ampliamente sobre la composición del Comité de Auditoría de la OMPI, para el cual los países en desarrollo pedían nueve miembros, y los países desarrollados sostenían que debía limitarse a cinco miembros. Se creará un grupo de trabajo para que revise el mandato del Comité de Auditoría y su tamaño, y presente recomendaciones ante el PBC en 2010.

    El centro de conferencias que la OMPI ha solicitado en repetidas ocasiones no consiguió luz verde ni roja, después de que Francia y España cuestionaran la prudencia de invertir en este proyecto de aproximadamente 64,2 millones de francos suizos en un momento en el que la OMPI recorta gastos en todas las demás áreas, según se indicó. Por lo tanto, el Comité del Programa y Presupuesto acordó “tomar nota” de las propuestas para la sala de conferencias y los plazos sugeridos, y analizar la posibilidad de autorizar fondos adicionales (aunque sin mencionar cuándo se realizaría tal análisis).

    Para este artículo se contó con la colaboración de William New.

    Traducido del inglés por Fernanda Nieto Femenia

    Kaitlin Mara may be reached at kmara@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.89.67.228