SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Latest Comments
  • So simply put, we have the NABP saying that all ph... »
  • The original Brustle decision was widely criticise... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Brasil-EE UU: la resolución de la OMC autorizaría medidas de retorsión cruzada contra DPI

    Published on 13 September 2009 @ 5:27 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    Según un informe arbitral que la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) ha publicado en el contexto de una diferencia entre el Brasil y los Estados Unidos (EE UU) sobre subvenciones al algodón americano, el primer país tendría derecho a adoptar contramedidas en materia de comercio en contra de EE UU y, en determinadas circunstancias, a suspender obligaciones en materia de propiedad intelectual (PI).

    El Brasil sostiene que este año las importaciones subvencionadas por EE UU ya han aumentado con respecto a las del año que los árbitros han utilizado como referencia; esto significa que se habría excedido el umbral indicado en el informe, en cuyo caso sería posible que el Brasil suspenda obligaciones en materia de PI. La reacción de EE UU ante el informe arbitral en lo relativo a la cuantía de contramedidas a que el Brasil tendría derecho fue de alivio, sin embargo, los productores estadounidenses denunciaron la resolución de la OMC.

    En 2002, el Brasil solicitó consultas de la OMC con EE UU sobre las subvenciones concedidas a los productores de algodón. En 2003, se estableció un grupo especial que constató en 2005 que EE UU no respetaba sus compromisos en la OMC en materia de subvenciones. En 2005, EE UU tomó medidas para cumplir la resolución, pero en 2006 el Brasil solicitó el establecimiento de un grupo especial sobre el cumplimiento de EE UU, que presentó un informe en diciembre de 2007 en el que concluye que el último país no había cumplido correctamente la resolución.

    En febrero de 2008, tanto el Brasil como EE UU apelaron. En junio de 2008, el informe del Órgano de Apelación confirmó la resolución del Grupo Especial según la cual EE UU no aplicaba los acuerdos de la OMC, y mantuvo las recomendaciones y resoluciones del Órgano de Solución de Diferencias (OSD) de 2005.

    En agosto de 2008, el Brasil solicitó la reanudación de los procedimientos de arbitraje relativos a su solicitud de aplicación de medidas de retorsión. Los árbitros decidieron en su informe que el Brasil podía aplicar medidas de retorsión en proporción a la cantidad de importaciones estadounidenses de algodón subvencionado que se constate que infringen las normas de la OMC.

    Según la OMC, EE UU no puede apelar nuevamente en este caso y el Brasil puede imponer las contramedidas autorizadas una vez que el OSD de la OMC dé la luz verde, posiblemente más adelante este mes.

    La OMC autorizó, en dos ocasiones anteriores, la suspensión de obligaciones en materia de derechos de propiedad intelectual (DPI) en el marco del Acuerdo sobre los Aspectos de los Derechos de Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio (ADPIC) de la OMC o del Acuerdo General sobre el Comercio de Servicios (AGCS), mediante un procedimiento denominado retorsión cruzada. Se autorizó a Antigua y Barbuda a aplicar medidas de retorsión cruzada en contra de EE UU en una diferencia sobre juegos de azar por Internet, y al Ecuador en una diferencia con la Unión Europea sobre el régimen de ésta última para la importación de bananos.

    Las medidas de retorsión cruzada se autorizaron tras constatar que un miembro de la OMC infringía normas comerciales y concluir que el hecho de aplicar medidas de retorsión en el mismo sector que el de la infracción podía resultar más dañino para el país reclamante que si no las aplicaba.

    Consecuencias imprecisas

    En el caso del Brasil, los árbitros acordaron que el país podía suspender determinadas obligaciones en el marco del Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC y/o el AGCS como medida de retorsión contra las subvenciones estadounidenses, pero las limitaron a un umbral anual calculado mediante una fórmula que se basa en las importaciones brasileñas de bienes de consumo procedentes de EE UU, según el informe arbitral de la OMC.

    Según fuentes, el Brasil había aducido que las medidas de retorsión alcanzarían un valor de casi 2.680 millones de dólares estadounidenses. Sus alegaciones se basaban en varios elementos. El primero era el relativo al programa de la “Fase 2″ de EE UU que, según concluyó la OMC en 2005, infringía las normas comerciales. Los otros eran un programa de incentivos a la exportación para productos agrícolas denominado GSM 102, los pagos por préstamos para la comercialización y los pagos anticíclicos por parte de EE UU.; además, solicitaba la suspensión de obligaciones de DPI en el marco del Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC y el AGCS.

    Los árbitros autorizarían la suspensión de las obligaciones derivadas del Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC y el AGCS además de las contramedidas que el Brasil está autorizado a aplicar sólo si se excede el umbral.

    El programa de la “Fase 2” emitió certificados de comercialización a los propietarios de fábricas estadounidenses de algodón con miras a reducir la diferencia de precio entre el algodón americano y el extranjero, según el Consejo Nacional del Algodón de EE UU. Un grupo especial de la OMC declaró que este programa infringía las normas comerciales y solicitó a EE UU que lo descartaran a más tardar en julio de 2005. No obstante, EE UU cumplió un año más tarde. El Brasil entonces pidió compensación por el período de incumplimiento, pero los árbitros de la OMC rechazaron la solicitud.

    Los pagos en el marco del programa GSM 102, también denominados garantías de créditos a la exportación, son incentivos a la exportación de productos agrícolas.

    Los árbitros de la OMC constataron que dicho programa infringía las normas comerciales y autorizaron al Brasil a aplicar contramedidas por un monto de 147 millones de dólares estadounidenses calculado a partir de las cifras de 2006. Este monto se actualiza cada año y se determina en relación con los pagos en el marco del programa GSM 102.

    En cuanto a los pagos por préstamos para la comercialización y los pagos anticíclicos, que son subvenciones directas otorgadas a nivel nacional con el propósito de compensar los menores precios de mercado del algodón, los árbitros de la OMC acordaron un nivel anual de contramedidas que también asciende a 147 millones de dólares estadounidenses.

    El Brasil se regocija, prevé un aumento de contramedidas en 2010

    En una publicación, el Brasil señaló que “el valor [de la autorización] es significativo, dado que es el segundo monto más elevado que jamás se ha autorizado en la historia de la OMC”.

    Las contramedidas relativas al programa GSM 102 deben calcularse nuevamente cada año, y el Brasil evaluó las posibles contramedidas en 800 millones de dólares estadounidenses para 2009. Si esta estimación se comprueba, el Brasil tendría la posibilidad de aplicar medidas de retorsión cruzada en el ámbito de algunos servicios o la PI estadounidenses.

    De acuerdo con la decisión de los árbitros, la suspensión de obligaciones en materia de DPI únicamente será posible después de que la cuantía de contramedidas admisibles exceda un umbral determinado mediante el cálculo establecido. En el ejercicio fiscal 2007, el umbral hubiese alcanzado los 409 millones de dólares estadounidenses, un portavoz brasileño comentó a Intellectual Property Watch. En 2009, podría elevarse a 460 millones de dólares estadounidenses; una vez excedida esta cifra, el Brasil podría imponer medidas de retorsión cruzada, añadió.

    El Brasil señaló que “esta autorización contribuye a reforzar el mecanismo de solución de diferencias de la OMC, y demuestra que el sistema es capaz de reconocer la obvia disparidad que existe entre los países desarrollados y los países en desarrollo”.

    La USTR se lo toma con filosofía, los productores estadounidenses de algodón se irritan

    La Oficina del Representante Comercial de EE UU (USTR, por sus siglas en inglés) expresó en un comunicado (en inglés) su decepción en relación con la resolución de la OMC, pero indicó que estaba “satisfecha del hecho de que los árbitros autorizaron al Brasil a aplicar una cuantía de contramedidas bastante inferior a la que había solicitado” y “agradecida de que los árbitros rechazaran la solicitud del Brasil relativa a la posibilidad de suspender de manera ilimitada concesiones en el ámbito de los servicios o la PI”.

    “Por el momento, no sabemos si el Brasil hará lo necesario para obtener la autorización final de suspender concesiones, o cuándo lo haría, ni si utilizaría una autorización semejante y cuándo”, confesó Carol Guthrie, la portavoz de la USTR.

    El Consejo Nacional del Algodón de EE UU junto a la Asociación Norteamericana de Exportadores de Granos (NAEGA, por sus siglas en inglés), el CoBank, el Consejo de Crédito Agrícola (Farm Credit Council), la Asociación de Productores de Arroz de los Estados Unidos (US Rice Producers Association) y el Consejo Nacional de Cooperativas Agrícolas (National Council of Farmer Cooperatives) publicaron, el pasado 2 de septiembre, un comunicado (en inglés) acerca de la resolución de la OMC.

    En éste, expresaron su decepción y opinaron que la decisión del Grupo Especial de la OMC se basó en el programa GSM que se implementaba en 2005, sin tomar en cuenta los “grandes cambios” que éste había sufrido desde entonces.

    Asimismo, instaron al gobierno de EE UU para que solicite el establecimiento de un nuevo grupo especial para actualizar la resolución con objeto de que ésta refleje los cambios del programa GSM que efectuaron el Congreso y el Departamento de Agricultura de EE UU.

    Traducido del inglés por Analín Pedroni

    Catherine Saez may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.90.231.18