SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    La revisión del caso Bilski por parte de la Corte Suprema de los EE.UU. podría repercutir en todo el sistema de patentes

    Published on 12 August 2009 @ 3:46 pm

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    El pasado mes de octubre, un tribunal de apelación de los Estados Unidos modificó drásticamente la ley de patentes, acercando así las normas de este país a las de otros en lo relativo a las invenciones que se pueden patentar. El Tribunal de Apelación del Circuito Federal (apodado a menudo el “tribunal de patentes” de los EE.UU) anuló uno de sus precedentes fundamentales y redujo fuertemente los tipos de métodos y procesos que pueden ser objeto de protección mediante patentes. La decisión dejó en entredicho a miles de patentes, entre ellas muchas relacionadas con métodos comerciales y métodos financieros.

    Este controvertido fallo será revisado muy pronto por la Corte Suprema de Justicia de los EE.UU.. La decisión resultante en el caso Bilski v.Doll podría marcar un hito en la legislación estadounidense de patentes, y repercutir en el resto del mundo.

    “Este es un punto crítico para el futuro del sistema de patentes de los EE.UU.”, dijo Sansón Helfgott, un socio en la oficina de Nueva York de la firma Katten Muchin Rosenman. “El Tribunal Supremo, o bien rechazará la decisión [del Tribunal Federal]… o creará una fuerte restricción en el sistema de patentes. Éste no podrá proteger una gran cantidad de innovaciones, y la gente intentará buscar otros medios de protegerlas”.

    El fallo también podría influir en las decisiones de otros países sobre el alcance de la materia patentable. “Los Estados Unidos siempre han sido líderes en el derecho de patentes”, afirmó Helfgott. “Cada vez que la Corte Suprema emite fallos en esta cuestión, otros países siguen la corriente”.

    La situación de State Street

    El derecho de patentes de los EE.UU. contiene una definición amplia de la materia patentable. Todo “proceso, máquina, manufactura o composición de materia que sea nuevo y útil” es potencialmente patentable.

    Existen, sin embargo, dudas acerca de precisamente qué tipos de procesos son patentables. ¿Son patentables los métodos de hacer negocio? ¿Qué pasa con los métodos financieros y jurídicos, tales como las operaciones de cobertura (hedging) de opciones sobre productos básicos o la colocación de opciones sobre acciones en un conocido tipo de refugio fiscal?

    En 1998, el Tribunal Federal dio una clara y resonante respuesta. En el caso State Street Bank. & Trust Co. v. Signature Financial Group el tribunal abrió de par en par las puertas de la Oficina de Patentes de los EE.UU. al afirmar que no sólo eran patentables los métodos comerciales, sino que cualquier proceso era patentable, siempre y cuando produjera “un resultado útil, concreto y tangible”.

    Con esta decisión se produjo una ola de nuevas patentes. Se emitieron, por ejemplo, más de 15.000 patentes de métodos comerciales en los Estados Unidos, y miles de solicitudes más están aún pendientes de aprobación.

    Sin embargo, en los últimos años la Corte Suprema de los EE.UU. ha revocado repetidamente las interpretaciones del derecho de patentes emitidas por el Tribunal Federal, reduciendo siempre los derechos que éste ha concedido a titulares y a solicitantes de patentes.

    En un pleito que el alto tribunal desestimó sin pronunciarse sobre su contenido, el Tribunal Federal fue de todas formas objeto de críticas. En el pleito Laboratory Corp. of America v. Metabolite Laboratories [pdf], tres de los nueve jueces de la Corte Suprema hicieron todo lo posible para criticar la decisión del Tribunal Federal en el pleito State Street: “En este litigio sí se afirma que un proceso es patentable si produce un resultado ‘útil, concreto y tangible’. … Sin embargo, esta Corte nunca ha hecho tal aseveración y, si se interpreta literalmente, la afirmación abarcaría casos en que esta Corte ha sostenido lo contrario”.

    El Tribunal Federal parece haber entendido el mensaje de la Corte Suprema. En 2008, el Tribunal Federal emitió una serie de resoluciones en las que se redujeron los derechos de los titulares y solicitantes de patentes.

    Para colmo, el Tribunal Federal dio a conocer su decisión en el caso Bilski [pdf]. El tribunal rechazó de forma explícita el nivel de patentabilidad del caso State Street y aprobó un nivel mucho más severo sobre la base de decisiones anteriores de la Corte Suprema. El tribunal sostuvo que un proceso es patentable sólo si “(1) está ligado a una máquina o aparato en particular, o (2) si transforma un artículo en particular en un estado o cosa diferente”.

    “La sentencia del Tribunal Federal se alejó de manera significativa de sus decisiones precedentes”, dijo Timothy R. Holbrook, profesor de derecho de patentes en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Emory en Atlanta. “El Tribunal Federal frenó bruscamente el alcance de la materia patentable”.

    El efecto técnico

    Al reducir las invenciones admisibles para la protección mediante patentes, el Tribunal Federal acercó considerablemente la legislación estadounidense a aquellas de Europa, Japón, China y muchas otras partes del mundo, cuyo punto de vista de la patentabilidad es mucho más estrecho. En estos países, para que una invención sea patentable, debe producir un “efecto técnico”.

    Por ejemplo, el software produce un efecto técnico, y es potencialmente patentable, si mejora el funcionamiento del computador que lo ejecuta, tal como permitiendo que el equipo opere más rápido o haga un uso más eficiente de la memoria. Si el software simplemente se ejecuta en el computador, no hay ningún efecto técnico y el software no es patentable.

    Debido a este requisito de “efecto técnico”, muchos tipos de software no son patentables. Los métodos comerciales y numerosos otros tipos de procesos tampoco se pueden patentar. Además, Europa y Japón excluyen explícitamente de la patentabilidad los métodos comerciales, según afirmó Steven J. Henry, un socio en el bufete de abogados de Boston Wolf, Greenfield & Sacks.

    El Tribunal Federal no llegó a adoptar estas normas. Aumentó los requerimientos de patentabilidad en los EE.UU., pero señaló expresamente que los métodos comerciales no son, per se, no patentables. El tribunal también rechazó explícitamente una norma de tipo europeo, señalando que las patentes no están limitadas a invenciones en el ámbito de las “artes tecnológicas”.

    Repercusiones mundiales

    Mientras que la decisión del Tribunal Federal en el caso Bilski acercó el derecho de patentes de los EE.UU. al de otros países, Europa y Japón han estado estudiando la posibilidad de acercarse más a la posición estadounidense.

    En octubre de 2008, el presidente de la Oficina Europea de Patentes remitió cuatro asuntos sobre patentes de software a la Junta ampliada de Apelaciones de la OEP. Se le ha pedido a la Junta que se pronuncie sobre qué tan estrechamente debe estar ligado el software a una máquina para que éste pueda ser patentable. Si la Junta flexibiliza la norma actual, en Europa podrían patentarse muchos más tipos de software.

    Japón, entretanto, está replanteando su posición sobre los métodos comerciales. “Están intentando modificar su legislación para permitir las patentes de métodos comerciales”, según afirmó Steven J. Henry.

    Sin embargo, Europa y Japón pueden decidir no ampliar sus definiciones de la materia patentable si la Corte Suprema de los EE.UU. confirma una severa norma de patentabilidad con el caso Bilski. “Se desalentarían los reformistas en Europa, que quisieran que allí se relajaran las normas”, dijo Henry.

    “Esto sin duda desalentaría los esfuerzos de los países por ampliar el alcance de la materia patentable”, dijo Helfgott, añadiendo que “el resto del mundo está pendiente de lo que suceda en los EE.UU. y espera ansiosamente el fallo de la Corte Suprema”.

    Traducido del inglés por Giselle Martinez de Melendez

    Steven Seidenberg may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 184.72.72.182