SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Caso Golan: EE UU podría incumplir con los tratados internacionales sobre derecho de autor

    Published on 29 May 2009 @ 11:51 am

    By for Intellectual Property Watch

    Recientemente, un Tribunal Federal de los Estados Unidos (EE UU) dio malas noticias al gobierno de este país así como a varios titulares de derechos de autor extranjeros –incluidos los de Sergéi Rajmáninov, Dmitry Shostakóvich, Sergéi Prokófiev e Igor Stravinsky. El tribunal derogó un estatuto estadounidense que había restablecido la protección de los derechos de autor a las obras de estos autores extranjeros.

    El Tribunal Federal de Distrito de Colorado sostuvo, en el caso Golan v. Holder [pdf en inglés], que el restablecimiento de los derechos de autor infringe la Primera Enmienda de la Constitución de EE UU que vela por la libertad de expresión de las personas físicas y jurídicas. Fue una sentencia sin precedentes: es la primera vez que un tribunal estadounidense declara que una disposición de las leyes estadounidenses sobre derecho de autor no respeta la Primera Enmienda.

    Sin embargo, es posible que el caso Golan ponga a EE UU en una situación bastante delicada. Al poner límites al restablecimiento de los derechos de autor, la sentencia podría hacer que EE UU no cumpla con las obligaciones contraídas con arreglo al Convenio de Berna y al Acuerdo sobre los aspectos de los derechos de propiedad intelectual relacionados con el comercio (Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC) de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC).

    “Si se confirma la decisión en la apelación, es probable que EE UU no respete estos tratados”, comentó Tyler Ochoa, profesor de Derecho internacional en materia de Propiedad Intelectual (PI) en la Escuela de Derecho de la Universidad de Santa Clara, en California.

    El problema surgió de unas condiciones poco comunes que solían disponer las leyes estadounidenses sobre derecho de autor. A título de ejemplo, durante la mayor parte del siglo XX, sólo se protegían los derechos de autor de una obra en EE UU si ésta se inscribía en la Oficina del Derecho de Autor de los Estados Unidos a su debido tiempo, y se mostraba un aviso sobre derechos de autor apropiado. La inscripción de la obra aseguraba su protección durante 28 años. Y si la inscripción se volvía a efectuar correctamente, se protegía la obra durante 28 años más.

    Las obras creadas en el extranjero, por lo general, no cumplían con dichas condiciones para obtener o prorrogar la protección de los derechos de autor en EE UU. Por ende, se protegían los derechos de autor de numerosas obras en sus países de origen, pero no en EE UU.

    En 1989, fecha en la que EE UU firmó el Convenio de Berna, este país debía restablecer la protección de los derechos de autor a varias de estas obras extranjeras. El artículo 18 del convenio obliga al país que se adhiere al tratado a proteger los derechos de autor de las obras extranjeras de otros países signatarios, siempre y cuando, en ese momento, dichas obras no hayan pasado al dominio público en sus países de origen.

    No obstante, el Convenio de Berna no dispone de un mecanismo de aplicación y EE UU no ha cumplido con el artículo 18.

    Esto cambió en 1994 cuando las negociaciones internacionales concluyeron la creación de la OMC y el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC. Éste último exige que todos los signatarios cumplan con ciertas normas mínimas en materia de protección de PI –incluidas las protecciones que figuran en el Convenio de Berna. Si un país incumple con el Acuerdo de los ADPIC, puede verse implicado en los procedimientos de solución de controversias de la OMC, lo que puede dar lugar a severas sanciones comerciales.

    “La diferencia entre el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC y el Convenio de Berna es que el primero puede morder”, explicó Christopher Sprigman, un profesor de la Escuela de Derecho de la Universidad de Virginia. “El Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC prevé un mecanismo de aplicación mediante el cual se puede imponer sanciones”.

    Con el propósito de respetar el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC, EE UU aprobó una ley en 1994 que restableció los derechos de autor de las obras extranjeras.

    Desafortunadamente, según el Tribunal de Distrito Federal que pronunció su sentencia el 3 de mayo en el caso Golan v. Holder, este estatuto -párrafo 514 de la Ley de los Acuerdos de la Ronda Uruguay, cuyo código es 17 USC §104A (en inglés)- infringe la Primera Enmienda de la Constitución estadounidense.

    La Corte Suprema de EE UU ha reducido en gran medida las incompatibilidades existentes entre la Primera Enmienda y el derecho de autor estadounidense. Desde el caso Eldred v. Ashcroft (en inglés), se permiten estas contradicciones sólo si el Congreso modifica “el marco tradicional de la protección de los derechos de autor”.

    Eso es lo que precisamente hizo el Congreso cuando adoptó el párrafo 514, en el cual se basó el Tribunal Federal de Apelación del Décimo Circuito en el caso Golan v. Gonzales [pdf en inglés].

    Restablecer los derechos de autor de las obras que hayan pasado al dominio público viola “el principio fundamental del derecho de autor que consiste en que las obras que hayan pasado al dominio público, allí permanecen”, declaró el tribunal en la decisión que pronunció en 2007.

    El Tribunal de Apelación entonces envió el caso de nuevo al Tribunal de Distrito con miras a determinar si el párrafo 514 infringía la Primera Enmienda.

    Según el Tribunal de Distrito que juzgó el caso Golan v. Holder, la infringía. (En este caso, el nombre de la parte demandada cambia cada vez que EE UU cambia de ministro de Justicia).

    El Tribunal de Distrito decidió que pese a que el respeto del Convenio de Berna y el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC representa un gran interés para EE UU, el párrafo 514 cumple mucho más de lo necesario con las exigencias de dichos tratados. Precisamente, cuando el párrafo 514 restableció los derechos de autor de algunas obras extranjeras, el estatuto creaba un recinto protegido reducido para las entidades que estaban usando estas obras en el momento en que se restableció el derecho de autor. El estatuto permite a estos usuarios a título del régimen anterior continuar con la reproducción y la comercialización de una obra, cuyos derechos de autor han sido restablecidos, durante un año a partir del momento en el que el titular de los derechos de autor presenta una advertencia previa para exigir el cumplimiento de sus derechos. Si un usuario a título del régimen anterior crea una obra derivada a partir de la obra protegida, a cambio de una “regalía razonable”, éste puede seguir explotando la obra derivada después de que el titular de los derechos de autor presenta una advertencia previa.

    El tribunal decidió que el Convenio de Berna (y, por consiguiente, el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC) permite a los países miembros proporcionar una protección mucho más importante a los usuarios a título del régimen anterior. “El Congreso podría haberse conformado al Convenio de Berna […] al exceptuar de manera permanente a las partes, por ejemplo a los demandantes, que han explotado obras que han pasado al dominio público”, afirmó el tribunal. Al limitar los derechos de los usuarios a título del régimen anterior en mayor medida que lo previsto en el Convenio de Berna, el gobierno violó la Primera Enmienda. El tribunal declaró que el párrafo 514 “no respeta el derecho de los usuarios a título del régimen anterior a utilizar las obras que explotaban cuando éstas estaban en el dominio público”.

    La sentencia del Tribunal de Distrito es controvertida. El gobierno estadounidense y algunos expertos en derecho de autor insisten que el Convenio de Berna no permite que los usuarios a título del régimen anterior gocen de derogaciones permanentes. Pero otros expertos afirman que sí.

    “En el Convenio de Berna no hay nada que diga o de a entender que [las adaptaciones que conciernen los usuarios a título del régimen anterior] sólo pueden ser temporales”, indicó Anthony Falzone, quien enseña derechos de autor en Stanford y defiende a Golan en el caso. Asimismo, añadió que “otras partes signatarias del convenio, como el Reino Unido, aplican adaptaciones permanentes que no se han cuestionado mediante el mecanismo de solución de controversias de la OMC”.

    Es poco probable que el Tribunal de Distrito tenga la última palabra en este caso. La mayor parte de los observadores piensa que el gobierno estadounidense apelará. Y si el Tribunal de Apelación del Décimo Circuito confirma la decisión en la apelación –lo que muchos piensan que pasará- EE UU podría afrontar repercusiones internacionales.

    “Si se confirma la decisión en la apelación, otro país podría pedir a la OMC que dictamine que estamos incumpliendo con las obligaciones que hemos contraído en el tratado”, dijo Ochoa. “Si el comité decide que no estamos respetando el Convenio de Berna, podría autorizar al país demandante a imponer sanciones comerciales contra EE UU”.

    Traducido del inglés por Analín Pedroni.

    Steven Seidenberg may be reached at info@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.89.67.228