SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Miembros de la OMPI impulsan la aplicación del Programa para el Desarrollo

    Published on 12 May 2009 @ 2:58 pm

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    Los miembros de la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual entablaron a finales de abril unas difíciles negociaciones para aprobar un nuevo plan para la aplicación de recomendaciones que permitan profundizar el enfoque de la OMPI en el desarrollo, según comentaron los participantes.

    Las reuniones del Comité de la OMPI sobre Desarrollo y Propiedad Intelectual (CDIP) tuvieron lugar entre el 27 de abril y el 1 de mayo.

    En medio de las preocupaciones de algunos países en desarrollo por el tiempo perdido en cuestiones de procedimiento, los miembros decidieron de manera general proceder a examinar las 45 recomendaciones del Programa de Desarrollo, agrupadas de forma flexible por temas, que fueron aprobadas en las asambleas generales de la OMPI en 2007. Se examinaron además las recomendaciones en el marco de varios temas, permitiendo así que la Secretaría de la OMPI busque financiación para la aplicación de aquellas recomendaciones en su próxima propuesta de presupuesto para 2010-2011, según informaron algunas fuentes.

    Además, los gobiernos iniciaron debates acerca de la manera de coordinar e informar sobre la aplicación de las recomendaciones, que puede ser una cuestión política. Según los participantes, los países desarrollados insistieron en que no se crearan nuevos mecanismos en la OMPI, mientras que diferentes grupos de países en desarrollo expresaron sugerencias en cuanto a las formas de proceder sobre la presentación de informes de los presidentes de los comités de la OMPI.

    Trevor Clarke, Embajador de Barbados y Presidente del Comité, celebrará consultas informales no vinculantes en el período que precederá a las reuniones de las Asambleas Generales del mes de septiembre, dijo.

    Las propuestas temáticas se volverán a publicar de manera que queden reflejadas las observaciones formuladas durante la semana, y se examinarán nuevamente en la próxima reunión del CDIP prevista para noviembre, según señalaron las fuentes.

    “El proceso va definitivamente por buen camino”, comentó un funcionario de Brasil, uno de los países que presentó originalmente la iniciativa del Programa de la OMPI para el Desarrollo en 2004. “Hemos decidido darle una oportunidad a un enfoque temático. El presidente ofreció las garantías necesarias para continuar con un enfoque equilibrado”.

    Las principales garantías, según comentó el brasilero a Intellectual Property Watch, tienen que ver con que, en el marco del enfoque temático, las recomendaciones individuales prevalecen sobre los temas, los proyectos son evolutivos y se pueden modificar a lo largo del camino, y existe cierta flexibilidad en el proceso.

    En una entrevista posterior, el Presidente Clarke dijo que el acuerdo principal era que se estructuraría la aplicación de las recomendaciones adoptadas por medio del enfoque de proyectos temáticos. Dijo que esto se consideraba útil porque los compromisos alcanzados para llegar a las 45 recomendaciones contenían algunas duplicaciones.

    El enfoque temático tiene por objeto reunir proyectos o partes de proyectos con actividades similares y aplicarlos, dijo Clarke. El enfoque “permitirá que se acelere la aplicación y se haga de manera más eficaz”, dijo.

    Tres de los temas examinados durante la semana fueron las recomendaciones relativas a la competencia, el dominio público, y la tecnología de la información y las comunicaciones (TIC) y la brecha digital. Otros temas incluyeron la transferencia de tecnología y la información sobre patentes. Los detalles de los proyectos se encuentran en los documentos de las reuniones, disponibles en el sitio Web de la OMPI.

    Las propuestas detalladas de la Secretaría sobre los proyectos relacionados con estos temas incluyeron la elaboración de numerosos estudios y otras iniciativas, y los presupuestos y plazos estimados. Se hicieron algunas modificaciones a los proyectos propuestos por la Secretaría para asegurarse de que reflejaran lo estipulado en las recomendaciones, Clarke dijo.

    Limitaciones al acceso por parte de los EE.UU., y transparencia

    Los Estados Unidos expresaron su desacuerdo con la recomendación No. 19, en la que se insta a que se inicien los debates sobre la manera de facilitar el acceso a los conocimientos y a la tecnología para los países en desarrollo. Dijo que los cambios propuestos eran una modificación sustancial y que se necesitaba una explicación más completa de los mismos. Los Estados Unidos aclararon además los comentarios incluidos en el informe de la reunión del CDIP de julio de 2008 en la que trató de limitar la información sobre la asistencia técnica prestada por la OMPI.

    Para la reunión celebrada en el marco de la recomendación No. 6, la OMPI preparó una lista de los consultores utilizados por la OMPI sobre cuestiones de desarrollo entre 2005 y 2008, que contiene los nombres de una gran variedad de empresarios, académicos y abogados. Su publicación es indicio de una mayor transparencia, pero no incluye mucha información acerca de los proveedores de asistencia técnica.

    Durante la semana se abordaron las siguientes recomendaciones: la 1, 3, 4, 6 y 7, además de la 19, 24 y 27. Estas se suman a las actividades de aplicación de las recomendaciones aprobadas en la última sesión del CDIP, en julio de 2008.

    Los proyectos propuestos irán ahora al Comité del Programa y Presupuesto de la OMPI, que se reunirá entre el 17 y el 19 de junio.

    La Secretaría publicó durante la semana un documento sobre las condiciones de un enfoque de proyectos temáticos. Se aclaró que las recomendaciones originales se conservarían intactas con las modificaciones de los Estados miembros, se mantendrían abiertas incluso si un proyecto termina, podrán formularse proyectos adicionales, se pondrán a disposición recursos financieros suficientes, podrían necesitarse actividades para la aplicación de algunos principios, habrá flexibilidad para la revisión de proyectos, y podrán incluirse recomendaciones individuales en más de un proyecto.

    La Secretaría circuló asimismo proyectos de documentos sobre una conferencia acerca de “la movilización de recursos para el desarrollo”, prevista a realizarse entre el 5 y el 9 de noviembre en Ginebra. Estos documentos pueden consultarse en www.ip-watch.org.

    Coordinación y evaluación

    Una de las cuestiones clave examinadas hacia finales de la semana fue la relativa a los mecanismos de coordinación, evaluación y presentación de informes sobre el trabajo realizado.

    Pakistán, respaldada por los miembros del Grupo Asiático, propuso que los presidentes de los comités de la OMPI informaran a las Asambleas Generales anuales sobre la forma como sus órganos ponen en práctica las recomendaciones del Programa para el Desarrollo. En la propuesta de Pakistán se pide a las Asambleas que en sus reuniones de septiembre “se exija a todos los comités de la OMPI que incorporen en su labor todas las recomendaciones del Programa de Desarrollo”.

    En la propuesta se pidió asimismo al Director General de la OMPI que formulara observaciones introductorias en las reuniones de las asambleas y comités de la OMPI sobre patentes, derechos de autor y derechos conexos, recursos genéticos, conocimientos tradicionales y folclore, programa y presupuesto, y marcas y observancia.

    Francis Gurry, Director General de la OMPI, se dirigió al CDIP para reiterar su compromiso con el Programa para el Desarrollo. Dijo que la coordinación de la Secretaría se llevará a cabo a través de la División de Coordinación del Programa para el Desarrollo, que le informa a él directamente.

    La Secretaría preparó la nueva metodología después de escuchar las preocupaciones de los miembros en cuanto a que las recomendaciones podrían solaparse, que no contenían suficiente información financiera detallada, y que se estaban moviendo con demasiada lentitud, dijo.

    Durante la semana de reuniones, las organizaciones no gubernamentales estuvieron presentes y dispuestas a hacer declaraciones sobre los temas objeto de debate. Algunas distribuyeron sus declaraciones en la reunión, con la intención de que quedaran incorporadas en el acta de la reunión. Entre las organizaciones estaba la Free Software Foundation Europa, y varios grupos internacionales de bibliotecas.

    En esa semana se celebraron además varios actos paralelos, entre ellos uno organizado por el Centro del Sur sobre la recomendación No. 22 del Programa para el Desarrollo, que proporciona una lista de cuestiones que deben tenerse en cuenta en las actividades normativas de la OMPI a fin de que sirvan de apoyo a los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio de la ONU.

    La próxima reunión del CDIP está prevista a realizarse entre el 16 y el 20 de noviembre.

    Traducido del inglés por Giselle Martínez

    William New may be reached at wnew@ip-watch.ch.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.237.77.132