SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Analysis: Monkey In The Middle Of Selfie Copyright Dispute

The recent case of a monkey selfie that went viral on the web raised thorny issues of ownership between a (human) photographer and Wikimedia. Two attorneys from Morrison & Foerster sort out the relevant copyright law.


Latest Comments
  • are you aware that within the photographic industr... »
  • A VPN is a virtual private network, which generall... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    OMS : l’espoir d’un consensus sur les contrefaçons reporté à l’Assemblée du mois de mai

    Published on 29 January 2009 @ 11:01 am

    By , Intellectual Property Watch

    La semaine dernière, un rapport et un projet de résolution de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) sur les produits médicaux contrefaits ont donné lieu à un débat animé, bien qu’aucun compromis n’ait encore été trouvé pour mettre fin aux désaccords quant au processus de consultation caché derrière le rapport sur les contrefaçons et au risque de se tromper de débat entre un problème de violation de la propriété intellectuelle et la question du danger que peuvent représenter de faux médicaments.

    Lors d’une réunion du Conseil exécutif de l’OMS, qui s’est tenue le 23 janvier, les membres ont convenu que l’organisation devrait établir d’autres rapports sur l’impact des médicaments contrefaits sur la santé publique et présenter d’autres notes d’information (sans résolution) qui seront discutés lors de l’Assemblée mondiale de la santé en mai prochain. Si les États membres ne parviennent pas à un consensus à ce moment-là, ces derniers envisageront la mise en place d’un groupe de travail intergouvernemental qui se réunira entre les différentes sessions.

    La réunion du Conseil exécutif de l’OMS s’est déroulée du 19 au 27 janvier.

    Le 23 janvier, alors que tous les États membres ont souligné l’importance de protéger la santé publique contre les risques que présentent les médicaments contrefaits, certains ont cherché à savoir si le projet de résolution (présenté le 18 décembre et consultable ici [pdf]) protègerait véritablement les intérêts publics ou s’il préserverait de façon disproportionnée ceux des titulaires de droits de propriété intellectuelle. D’autres se sont demandé si, à trop se pencher sur la question des contrefaçons, on ne détournerait pas les yeux d’autres problèmes de santé publique, comme les lots de médicaments autorisés non conformes ou de mauvaise qualité.

    Les principales inquiétudes soulevées ont concerné le débat de fond sur la définition précise d’une « contrefaçon » dans le contexte de l’OMS et le débat sur la procédure suivie par le groupe de travail international de lutte contre la contrefaçon de médicaments IMPACT (International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce), créé en 2006. Le travail technique de ce dernier [pdf en anglais] a beaucoup influencé le projet de rapport, mais certains pays en développement ont eu l’impression que leur voix n’était pas assez représentée au sein du groupe.

    Le Directeur général de l’OMS, Margaret Chan, a assuré au Conseil que les nouveaux rapports qui seraient publiés par l’organisation aborderaient les questions soulevées par les États membres lors des débats du 23 janvier. Ces rapports traiteront du processus parallèle de la Stratégie et du plan d’action mondiaux de l’OMS pour la santé publique, l’innovation et la propriété intellectuelle, afin de voir si son texte (qui a déjà fait l’objet d’un consensus) peut répondre aux questions de propriété intellectuelle liées aux produits médicaux contrefaits.

    La définition d’une « contrefaçon »

    « Une contrefaçon est une violation d’un droit de propriété intellectuelle [et] cause du tort au détenteur d’une marque commerciale », a rappelé le Paraguay au nom du Groupe des États d’Amérique latine et des Caraïbes, à l’ouverture des débats. « La caractérisation de cette infraction ne comporte pas de critère de santé ».

    La définition juridique d’une contrefaçon dans l’Accord de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce sur les aspects des droits de propriété intellectuelle qui touchent au commerce (Accord sur les ADPIC), qui établit un lien explicite avec la violation d’une marque, a suscité des inquiétudes chez de nombreux États membres et organisations non gouvernementales.

    Ce qui préoccupe les États et les ONG, c’est que le lien fait entre ces deux concepts conduise l’OMS à s’impliquer dans l’application des droits de propriété intellectuelle et mette les fabricants de médicaments génériques dans une situation difficile. La récente affaire de l’arrestation aux Pays-Bas d’un chargement de médicaments génériques contre l’hypertension en partance de l’Inde et à destination du Brésil a contribué à alimenter ces inquiétudes. De nombreux pays demandent plutôt de l’aide pour renforcer les capacités de leurs autorités de réglementation des médicaments et pour pouvoir se concentrer sur les médicaments contrefaits, de mauvaise qualité et portant de fausses étiquettes.

    Le rapport de l’ONG Third World Network intitulé « WHO: Approach to “counterfeit” drugs may affect access to medicines » (OMS : l’approche concernant les médicaments contrefaits pourrait nuire à l’accès aux médicaments) expose certaines des préoccupations liées au fait que les définitions établies par l’OMS pourraient restreindre l’utilisation des médicaments génériques.

    Certains ont évoqué ce que l’Égypte a appelé un « manque de clarté dans les définitions ». « Nous ne savons pas ce que « contrefaçon » signifie dans le contexte de la mission de l’OMS », a confié le Brésil, ajoutant ensuite qu’il s’agissait « d’une faute cruciale dans le processus » et qu’il n’était « pas possible de poursuivre [les négociations] avant d’avoir compris cela ».

    D’autres étaient préoccupés par ce qui s’est avéré être une erreur dans le rapport original de l’OMS, qui déclarait que « les conflits liés aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou la violation de ces droits ne doivent pas être confondus avec la contrefaçon ». Dans la version proposée par le groupe IMPACT, le mot « brevets » a remplacé « droits de propriété intellectuelle ».

    « Nous avons été dérangés par le fait qu’au départ, l’OMS a distribué un document qui élargissait considérablement la portée des exclusions à tous les droits de propriété intellectuelle », ont expliqué les États-Unis.

    L’OMS a procédé à une correction [pdf] en remplaçant l’ancienne formulation par « brevets ».

    « La falsification d’un médicament » est considérée comme « un crime abominable », a confié le Brésil, et l’OMS est là pour trouver le moyen de garantir la qualité, la sécurité et l’efficacité des médicaments. Mais, a ajouté le délégué brésilien, elle n’est pas la tribune appropriée pour les débats sur l’application des droits de propriété intellectuelle (bien que les discussions sur la politique en matière de propriété intellectuelle telles qu’elles sont définies par la Stratégie mondiale y ont leur place).

    L’idée selon laquelle l’application des droits de propriété intellectuelle est mieux gérée par les organisations internationales spécialisées dans ce domaine a été reprise par d’autres délégations, comme l’Argentine, le Bangladesh, l’Égypte, la Thaïlande et l’Uruguay.

    L’un après l’autre, deux pays en développement ont confié à Intellectual Property Watch que la situation rappelait les pressions faites par le passé pour donner davantage de pouvoir d’exécution en matière de propriété intellectuelle aux gardes-frontières à travers l’Organisation mondiale des douanes, autre organisation internationale qui n’est normalement pas impliquée dans les questions de propriété intellectuelle.

    Mais « nous ne cherchons pas ici à faire appliquer les droits de propriété intellectuelle », a assuré à Intellectual Property Watch le délégué d’un pays développé qui avait soutenu le rapport original. Même si les actions visant à lutter contre les contrefaçons de médicaments « favorisent indirectement les détenteurs de marques », l’objectif principal est bien de protéger la santé publique et il n’est pas question d’un « programme d’action caché ».

    « Les droits de propriété intellectuelle, comme leur mise en application, sont des outils que nous utilisons pour combattre la contrefaçon de produits médicaux lorsque nous pensons que c’est opportun, mais notre intérêt est de sauver les patients », a expliqué Aline Plançon, responsable d’un projet de coopération entre IMPACT et l’organisation internationale de police INTERPOL. Mme Plançon travaille à plein temps avec l’OMS depuis mars 2008 dans la lutte contre la contrefaçon de médicaments. « Nous utilisons également les lois sur la réglementation des médicaments ou celles sur le blanchiment de capitaux, soit tous les outils juridiques à notre disposition », a-t-elle précisé. Un représentant de l’industrie est allé dans le même sens en affirmant que « les marques servent à lutter contre le faux étiquetage ».

    Étant donné qu’il serait politiquement impossible de changer le terme « contrefaçon », la délégation suisse a proposé d’employer l’expression « produit médical contrefait » et une définition propre à l’OMS afin de réduire tout risque de confusion.

    L’initiative IMPACT

    La Hongrie a déclaré au nom de l’Union européenne qu’elle « soutenait activement les efforts de l’OMS et son rôle directeur auprès du groupe de travail IMPACT ». Les États-Unis ont déclaré que le groupe avait rempli son rôle en luttant contre la contrefaçon de manière « exceptionnelle » et le Royaume-Uni l’a félicité pour avoir « largement contribué à sensibiliser et à éveiller l’intérêt des acteurs concernés ».

    Mais les autres délégations ont semblé moins convaincues. Les collaborateurs d’IMPACT sont « principalement issus de pays développés et de l’industrie pharmaceutique, et les pays en développement sont sous-représentés », a déploré l’Indonésie, s’exprimant au nom du Bureau régional de l’Asie du Sud-Est.

    D’après sa dernière brochure de présentation [pdf en anglais], la commission d’IMPACT est composée de membres des gouvernements allemand, américain, australien, nigérian et singapourien. La commission regroupe également des représentants de la Fédération internationale de l’industrie du médicament (FIIM) et de la Fédération internationale pharmaceutique (FIP), ainsi que deux employés de l’OMS et un d’INTERPOL.

    L’une des principales protestations a porté sur le fait que le groupe de travail a entamé des négociations en dehors de l’OMS et n’a par conséquent pas suivi la procédure habituellement dirigée par les États membres selon laquelle les documents sont normalement rédigés. Le Bangladesh s’est montré préoccupé, « du fait que les décisions devraient toutes être discutées et prises par les États membres ». Le Brésil, l’Indonésie (au nom du Bureau régional de l’Asie du Sud-Est), la Thaïlande et le Venezuela ont exprimé des inquiétudes similaires.

    « L’Égypte est également préoccupée au sujet d’IMPACT », a déclaré une déléguée du pays, « car le groupe n’a été mandaté par aucun des organes directeurs de l’OMS ». Par ailleurs, le Chili a demandé d’où venaient les financements de l’initiative et pourquoi le groupe se réunissait « partout sauf à Genève ». L’Argentine, quant à elle, a rejeté l’idée d’une harmonisation internationale des mécanismes de contrôle des contrefaçons.

    La Suisse a salué les questions portant sur les motivations, le mandat, le principe d’inclusion et le financement d’IMPACT, et a également souligné le fait que la qualité du travail technique du groupe n’était jamais mise en doute. Le pays a ajouté que « l’absence de résolution en mai permettrait aux fabricants et aux distributeurs de produits contrefaits de continuer leurs activités ». Le président a acquiescé et renchéri en disant que le fait de « ne pas avoir de résolution [du Conseil exécutif] est préoccupant, car cela met les contrefacteurs dans une position confortable ».

    Mme Plançon, qui coordonne l’exécution du travail d’IMPACT par l’OMS, a rappelé que « le groupe est ouvert et tous les États qui souhaitent en faire partie sont les bienvenus ». Après avoir décrit la lutte contre la contrefaçon comme « une course » contre le crime organisé, elle a ajouté que « si l’on souhaite vraiment faire la différence, on ne peut pas se permettre de passer des semaines à débattre de points de détails. Plus de temps on perd, plus ils en gagnent ».

    Un préjudice causé aux médicaments autorisés ?

    S’adressant à Intellectual Property Watch, un diplomate issu d’un pays en développement a souligné que la question de l’accès aux médicaments de bonne qualité à un prix abordable n’était pas examinée dans le rapport, laissant entendre que l’on n’accordait pas à la promotion des médicaments autorisés la même priorité.

    « Nous ne connaissons pas l’impact qu’ont les prix élevés sur la contrefaçon », a rappelé le Brésil. Le Sultanat d’Oman, quant à lui, a demandé des informations sur la durée de protection des brevets et l’importance du trafic illicite de médicaments.

    Si l’on se concentre trop sur les contrefaçons, on risque de se détourner de problèmes plus importants, a affirmé une source non gouvernementale. Parmi ces autres questions importantes, on trouve le trafic de médicaments non frauduleux mais de mauvaise qualité en raison d’un problème de production ou de stockage, ou parce que le contrôle de la qualité dans le pays d’où ils proviennent est moins exigeant.

    Les médicaments de mauvaise qualité ont davantage de conséquences sur la santé publique que les contrefaçons, a affirmé l’Égypte. Dans une récente étude [pdf en anglais], l’organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) était arrivée aux mêmes conclusions.

    « Il ne doit pas s’agir d’un jeu politique », a déclaré un délégué africain. Ce dont nous avons besoin, c’est de financement pour pouvoir renforcer les capacités des autorités de réglementation et arrêter l’afflux de médicaments de mauvaise qualité en Afrique, qui est en train de devenir une véritable « décharge ».

    Traduit de l’anglais par Griselda Jung

    Avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.227.231.229