SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    El esperado consenso en torno al informe y al proyecto de resolución sobre falsificación de la OMS se aplaza hasta la Asamblea de mayo

    Published on 29 January 2009 @ 2:05 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Kaitlin Mara
    La semana pasada, un informe y un proyecto de resolución sobre la falsificación de productos médicos de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) generaron acalorados debates, aunque aún no se han logrado avenencias para salvar las distancias en lo relativo al proceso de consultas que subyace en dicho informe y el riesgo de confundir las violaciones de la propiedad intelectual con la falsificación potencialmente peligrosa de medicamentos.

    En la reunión del Consejo Ejecutivo de la OMS llevada a cabo el 23 de enero, los Estados miembros aceptaron que la Secretaría de la OMS realizara un informe más detallado a fin de abordar las dimensiones de los medicamentos falsificados en términos de salud pública, y presentara textos informativos adicionales (sin resolución) con el fin de deliberar sobre ellos durante la Asamblea Mundial de la Salud que ha de celebrarse en mayo. Si no se lograra un consenso para entonces, los Estados miembros podrían considerar la posibilidad de crear un grupo de trabajo intergubernamental para que se reúna entre las sesiones.

    El Consejo Ejecutivo de la OMS se reunió del 19 al 27 de enero.

    Si bien el 23 de enero todos los Estados miembros hicieron hincapié en la importancia de proteger la salud pública contra los peligros que suscita la falsificación de medicamentos, algunos cuestionaron el hecho de si el proyecto de resolución (publicado el 18 de diciembre y disponible aquí [pdf]) protegería el interés público o si, por el contrario, desviaría la atención hacia la protección de los derechos de los titulares de propiedad intelectual. Otros expresaron sus dudas sobre si un enfoque en la falsificación no restaría importancia a otras cuestiones en materia de salud pública, tales como los lotes de calidad inferior o los defectos de calidad en medicamentos legítimos.

    Entre las inquietudes expresadas se destacaron los debates sustantivos sobre la precisa definición de falsificación en el contexto de la OMS y los debates procedimentales sobre la labor del Grupo Especial Internacional contra la Falsificación de Productos Médicos (IMPACT, por su sigla en inglés). Creado en 2006, el IMPACT representa una colaboración de organismos contra la falsificación. La labor técnica del grupo [pdf en inglés] influyó en gran medida en el proyecto de informe; sin embargo, algunos países en desarrollo consideraron que sus intereses no estaban representados adecuadamente en dicho grupo.

    Margaret Chan, Directora General de la OMS, señaló al Consejo que el nuevo informe de la organización abordará las cuestiones planteadas por los Estados miembros durante los debates entablados el 23 de enero. También se examinará el proceso paralelo sobre la estrategia mundial y plan de acción sobre salud pública, innovación y propiedad intelectual de la OMS a fin de determinar si el texto, sobre el cual ya se alcanzó un consenso, puede informar sobre asuntos relativos a la propiedad intelectual con respecto a los productos médicos falsificados.

    El problema de la “falsificación”

    “La falsificación constituye una infracción de un derecho de propiedad intelectual [y] perjudica al titular de una marca”, sostuvo el representante de Paraguay en nombre del Grupo de Estados de América Latina y el Caribe (GRULAC, por su sigla en inglés) al inicio del debate. “La tipificación de esta infracción no incluye criterios en materia de salud”, agregó.

    Varios Estados miembros y organismos no gubernamentales expresaron su gran preocupación por el significado jurídico de falsificación en virtud del Acuerdo sobre los Aspectos de los Derechos de la Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio (ADPIC), que la vincula explícitamente con la violación de marcas. Para obtener más información, consulte IPW, WHO, 16 de enero de 2008.

    La preocupación reside en el hecho de que tal asociación no sólo abre las puertas para que la OMS participe en las actividades de observancia de la propiedad intelectual, sino también genera el riesgo de que los fabricantes de medicamentos genéricos afronten impugnaciones relativas a propiedad intelectual. El reciente caso sobre un envío de medicamentos genéricos antihipertensivos que se dirigía de la India a Brasil y que fue interceptado en los Países Bajos ha sustentado tal inquietud. Por ende, numerosas naciones solicitan asistencia para crear capacidad en sus organismos de reglamentación farmacéutica y centrar la atención en los medicamentos falsificados, con etiquetas falsas y de calidad inferior.

    Un informe elaborado por la organización no gubernamental Third World Network titulado “WHO: Approach to ‘counterfeit’ drugs may affect access to medicines” (OMS: el enfoque en la ‘falsificación’ de fármacos puede afectar el acceso a los medicamentos) especifica algunas de las preocupaciones sobre las maneras en que las definiciones de la OMS pueden restringir el uso de medicamentos genéricos.

    Otros mencionaron lo que Egipto denominó una “falta de claridad respecto de los asuntos definitorios”. “No sabemos lo que significa la falsificación en el contexto del mandato de la OMS”, afirmó el representante de Brasil, y agregó que se trata de “un pecado capital en el proceso” y que “no podemos proseguir [con las negociaciones] hasta comprenderlo”.

    Otros mostraron preocupación por lo que resultó ser un error en el informe original de la OMS que versaba: “no cabe confundir las falsificaciones con las violaciones de derechos de propiedad intelectual o las controversias con ellas relacionadas”. La versión del IMPACT dice “patentes”, y no “derechos de propiedad intelectual”.

    “Nos preocupa que la OMS haya hecho circular originalmente un documento que amplía de manera considerable el alcance de las exclusiones a todos los derechos de propiedad intelectual”, manifestó el delegado de EE. UU.

    La OMS publicó una corrección [pdf] en la que se cambió el texto a “patentes”.

    “La falsificación de medicamentos” se considera “un delito atroz”, declaró el representante de Brasil, y la OMS constituye el foro mediante el cual se procuran modos de garantizar la calidad, la seguridad y la eficacia de los medicamentos. Sin embargo, agregó el delegado, no representa el foro para llevar a cabo debates sobre la observancia de los derechos de propiedad intelectual, a pesar de que se entablen, de hecho, deliberaciones sobre políticas de propiedad intelectual según se definen en la estrategia mundial.

    La observancia de la propiedad intelectual se aplica de manera más adecuada mediante los organismos internacionales especializados, opinión compartida por otras delegaciones, entre ellas, Argentina, Bangladesh, Egipto, Tailandia y Uruguay.

    Por separado, los delegados de dos países en desarrollo señalaron a Intellectual Property Watch que esta situación se asemejaba a un anterior esfuerzo por otorgar facultades de observancia de la propiedad intelectual a las guardias de frontera a través de la Organización Mundial de Aduanas, otro organismo internacional que no participa normalmente en las políticas en materia de propiedad intelectual.

    Sin embargo, un delegado de un país desarrollado que respaldó el informe original dijo a Intellectual Property Watch que “la observancia no es nuestro objetivo”. Si bien las acciones destinadas a poner fin a la falsificación de productos médicos “podrían ayudar indirectamente a los titulares de marcas”, el principal propósito es la salud pública y no existe un “orden del día secreto”.

    “Los derechos de propiedad intelectual constituyen una herramienta que utilizamos, a modo de observancia, en la lucha contra la falsificación de productos médicos cuando lo consideramos apropiado, pero el interés primordial es salvar vidas”, afirmó Aline Plançon, directora de proyectos de una cooperación conjunta entre el IMPACT y la Organización Internacional de Policía Criminal (INTERPOL). Plançon ha trabajado a tiempo completo con la OMS desde marzo de 2008 en la lucha contra los productos médicos falsificados. “También aplicamos las leyes sobre reglamentación farmacéutica o sobre lavado de dinero: todo instrumento jurídico que esté a nuestro alcance”, agregó. Un representante de la industria coincidió y agregó que “las marcas son útiles para combatir el etiquetado falso”.

    El delegado de Suiza sugirió que, dado que el cambio del término “falsificación” podría no ser factible políticamente, el uso de la frase “falsificación de productos médicos”, con la inclusión de una definición específica de la OMS, podría llegar a reducir la confusión.

    En nombre de la Unión Europea, el delegado de Hungría del proceso del IMPACT afirmó que “respalda activamente los esfuerzos y la función de liderazgo de la OMS en el grupo IMPACT”; el representante de EE. UU., por su parte, señaló que el grupo había cumplido su función de combatir la falsificación “de manera excepcional”; y el delegado del Reino Unido felicitó al grupo por su “importante contribución con la tarea de fomentar la concienciación y hacer participar a las partes interesadas”.

    No obstante, otras partes no mostraron tal confianza. El consejo del IMPACT “está formado principalmente por países desarrollados y representantes del sector farmacéutico; los países en desarrollo están subrepresentados”, manifestó el delegado de Indonesia, que se pronunció en nombre de la Oficina Regional para el Asia Sudoriental (SEARO).

    Los miembros del consejo del IMPACT, según se desprende de su más reciente publicación [pdf en inglés], provienen de los gobiernos de Alemania, Australia, EE. UU., Nigeria y Singapur. Otros miembros del consejo son representantes de la Federación Internacional de Asociaciones de Industriales Farmacéuticos (IFPMA) y la Federación Farmacéutica Internacional, además de dos funcionarios de la OMS y uno de la INTERPOL.

    Uno de los reclamos principales es que el grupo entabló negociaciones sin la participación de la OMS y, por lo tanto, no respetó el proceso impulsado por los Estados miembros mediante el cual se elaboran normalmente los documentos. Bangladesh mostró “preocupación [porque] los Estados miembros deberían ser los responsables de deliberar y adoptar todas las decisiones”. Brasil, Indonesia (en nombre de la SEARO), Tailandia y Venezuela expresaron opiniones similares.

    Existen “inquietudes en Egipto acerca del IMPACT”, sostuvo un delegado de esta nación, dado que dicho grupo “no cuenta con un mandato otorgado por ninguno de los órganos rectores de la OMS”. Chile preguntó de dónde provenían los fondos del grupo y por qué sus sesiones se celebraban “en cualquier lugar, excepto en Ginebra”; por otro lado, el representante de Argentina manifestó que este país se opone a la armonización internacional de mecanismos para controlar la falsificación.

    Suiza reconoció los cuestionamientos relativos a la motivación, el mandato, la integración y el financiamiento del IMPACT, pero también destacó que no se puso en tela de juicio la calidad de la labor técnica del IMPACT. Además, “en caso de no contar con una resolución en mayo, se estaría dando luz verde a los fabricantes y los distribuidores de productos falsificados para que continúen con sus actividades libremente”. El Presidente del Consejo Ejecutivo asintió y mostró preocupación por el hecho de “no contar con una resolución emanada del [Consejo Ejecutivo]”, dado que ello “representa una gran cooperación con los falsificadores”.

    Plançon, quien coordina la labor de observancia del grupo de la OMS, sostuvo que “el grupo está abierto y cualquier Estado puede participar si así lo desea”. Tras denominar a la lucha contra la falsificación “una carrera” contra el crimen organizado, agregó que “si se desea marcar una diferencia práctica, no es posible dedicar semanas enteras a la deliberación sobre nimiedades. Mientras más perdemos nosotros, más ganan ellos”.

    ¿Se perjudica a los medicamentos legítimos?

    Un diplomático de un país en desarrollo señaló a Intellectual Property Watch que en el informe no se mencionó el acceso a medicamentos de calidad a precios asequibles, lo que sugiere que el fomento de medicamentos legítimos no constituye una prioridad tan válida.

    Por otro lado, el delegado de Brasil dijo: “Desconocemos el impacto de los precios elevados en la falsificación”, y el representante de Omán solicitó información sobre el período de validez de las patentes y el grado de comercialización de los fármacos ilícitos.

    El enfoque en la falsificación puede desviar la atención de otras cuestiones más importantes, manifestó una fuente no gubernamental. Por ejemplo, tales cuestiones pueden incluir el comercio de medicamentos que no son falsos, pero son de baja calidad debido a problemas de fabricación o de almacenamiento, o debido a controles de calidad deficientes en los productos exportados de un país.

    Los medicamentos de calidad inferior tienen un impacto mayor en la salud pública que los productos falsificados, señaló el representante de Egipto. En un reciente estudio realizado por Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) [pdf en inglés] se llega a la misma conclusión.

    “No debería tratarse de un juego político”, dijo un delegado de África. Lo que necesitamos, agregó, es financiar el incremento de capacidad en los organismos reglamentarios a fin de detener la afluencia de medicamentos de mala calidad, para los cuales África representa un “vertedero”.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 184.72.69.79