SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • 'Business methods were generally not patentable in... »
  • Big win for humanity! It's great to see that in Ec... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Progresa la reunión sobre preparación para la gripe aviar; el tema de la PI aún sin resolver

    Published on 23 December 2008 @ 1:27 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Kaitlin Mara
    Se logró un gran avance en la reunión sobre preparación para una gripe pandémica, celebrada por la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) en diciembre: los delegados presentes buscaron –y encontraron– una manera de satisfacer a los Estados Miembros cuyos puntos de vista divergen en cuanto a la necesidad de tener acceso a los virus y materiales biológicos relacionados así como también a las vacunas y otros beneficios.

    No obstante, los temas polémicos –incluidos los derechos de propiedad intelectual (DPI) y las definiciones– aún permanecen sin resolver. Los delegados esperan que el trabajo que se efectúe de manera informal entre períodos de sesiones facilite la búsqueda de consenso cuando se reanude la reunión el próximo mes de mayo.

    El texto de compromiso acordado en materia de intercambio de virus y compartición de beneficios dice lo siguiente: [los Estados Miembros] “reconocen su compromiso de compartir en igualdad de condiciones el subtipo H5N1, otros virus gripales potencialmente pandémicos para el hombre y los beneficios resultantes, considerando que éstos son de igual importancia en la acción colectiva para la salud pública mundial”. La redacción de este texto fue percibida como un éxito mayor en la reunión intergubernamental sobre preparación para una gripe pandémica celebrada del 8 al 13 de diciembre.

    Las versiones anteriores fueron objeto de debates sobre el marco “voluntario” y el marco “obligatorio” sin que se logre obtener el consenso. Sin embargo, los debates informales entre Estados Miembros clave –principalmente Estados Unidos e Indonesia– culminaron con la aceptación recíproca de un texto que muchos saludaron como uno de los avances primordiales de esta reunión.

    Indonesia, apoyado por otros países en desarrollo y varias organizaciones no gubernamentales, cree que sus DPI sobre las cepas víricas que se originan en su territorio le permiten determinar las condiciones de su utilización. Indonesia sostiene que a cambio de “donar” cepas víricas de gripe aviar a los laboratorios de investigación y fabricantes de vacunas, necesita una garantía que asegure la compartición de las vacunas que se obtengan a partir de dichas cepas a precios asequibles. Otros Estados opinaron que el intercambio de virus es necesario, en especial cuando los países no tienen capacidad de desarrollo de vacunas.

    El vínculo entre intercambio de virus y compartición de beneficios había sido la “manzana de la discordia” entre Estados Unidos e Indonesia, comentó Abdulsalam Nasidi, responsable de la salud pública en Nigeria.

    El texto de compromiso constituyó “un gran avance”, afirmó otro delegado. No obstante, agregó que las cuestiones en materia de DPI “aún quedan pendientes” y tratarlas será complicado puesto que las posiciones al respecto representan dos puntos de vista opuestos.

    El tema de la Propiedad Intelectual aún sin resolver

    La propiedad intelectual (PI) es “otro tema complejo”, uno que era “demasiado extenso” como para abordarlo en esta reunión, afirmó Widjaja Lukito, asesor del Ministro de Sanidad y Orden Público de Indonesia. Pero agregó que lograr la compartición de beneficios es una prioridad inicial y llegar a un compromiso al respecto representa un progreso significativo.

    Esta reunión esencialmente “evitó [las cuestiones de PI] sabiendo lo polémicas que son”, comentó el delegado de un país desarrollado. Sin embargo, este tema deberá abordarse en un Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material para los movimientos de materiales biológicos, un logro fundamental de la reunión intergubernamental que todavía debe finalizarse, añadió.

    Las cuestiones de PI que los Estados Miembros consideran fundamentales son qué tipo de material puede patentarse (virus enteros, partes de virus o tecnologías y otros productos que pueden desarrollarse a partir de estos virus o partes) y sobre cuáles beneficios un país de origen o un investigador puede reivindicar DPI, indicó la Presidente de la reunión, Jane Halton, de origen australiano, a los delegados presentes durante una sesión plenaria en la mañana del 12 de diciembre. Y añadió que todavía es necesario esclarecer ciertos aspectos técnicos para que sea posible redactar el texto sobre PI.

    “Estas cuestiones de PI son tan cruciales”, afirmó un delegado de Estados Unidos durante la sesión plenaria, “que subsisten inquietudes incluso con respecto a si este es o no el foro indicado para tratarlas”.

    Sin embargo, un delegado de Brasil afirmó que “este es el foro apropiado”, y recordó a la sesión plenaria que, este mismo año, se aprobó una Estrategia Mundial sobre Salud Pública, Innovación y Propiedad Intelectual que cambió el mandato de la OMS. Asimismo, el delegado sostuvo que “Brasil mantiene su posición a favor de tratar todo lo relativo a la salud pública en la OMS”.

    Tal vez la “PI no sea el asunto más importante”, comentó Nasidi tras la última sesión plenaria. Si se pudiera convenir en que los fabricantes de vacunas otorguen licencias exentas de regalías a todos los países capaces de desarrollar vacunas, en particular en caso de pandemia, y con el propósito de salvar vidas, entonces la salud pública podría ser una prioridad sin que sea necesario reivindicar DPI.

    Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material y definiciones

    Una vez finalizada la reunión del 13 de diciembre, el delegado de un gran país en desarrollo advirtió que no se debe ser “demasiado optimista” dado que, aunque se está realizando un muy buen trabajo, todavía quedan muchos retos por delante. Uno de ellos es, en especial, el tema de la aplicabilidad del marco acordado a aquellos organismos y centros de investigación que pueden recibir materiales biológicos de preparación para una gripe pandémica (materiales biológicos PIP) pero que no pertenecen a la Red OMS, comentó el delegado. Esto requeriría que el Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material, que aún no se ha finalizado, establezca un mecanismo.

    La dificultad de establecer el Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material reside en parte en que aún no se ha logrado un acuerdo en cuanto a lo que debe abarcar la definición de los “materiales biológicos PIP”, y esto es esencial para determinar el ámbito de aplicación de varias disposiciones del Marco de preparación para una gripe pandémica, en particular el Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material. Estados Unidos está presionando para que la definición de dichos materiales sea reducida. Está a favor de que, entre otras cosas, la definición se centre en los virus gripales “salvajes” o aislados víricos, y excluya a proteínas virales y otras partes de los virus, información sobre secuencias genéticas, células y partes celulares así como anticuerpos y proteínas derivados del virus.

    Según una fuente, la posición que toma Estados Unidos consiste en seguir focalizándose en la salud pública y no en las políticas puesto que una definición más amplia incita a que se produzcan debates sobre DPI. Estados Unidos piensa que la definición que propone es la mínima requerida para alcanzar los objetivos de salud pública así como también la que podría ser objeto de consenso.

    Sin embargo, otros Estados Miembros se inquietan de que una definición reducida limite el alcance de los logros de la reunión intergubernamental. Un delegado indonesio opinó que la definición de materiales biológicos debería estar vinculada a la verdadera utilización de dichos materiales en el desarrollo tecnológico. Por ejemplo, las muestras de sangre contaminada contienen material genético útil además de sólo un virus salvaje. La definición debería incluir todo este tipo de material, añadió el delegado.

    El delegado de un gran país en desarrollo manifestó su inquietud con respecto al hecho de reducir la definición porque esto crearía una laguna jurídica para obviar las obligaciones establecidas en un Marco de preparación para una gripe pandémica que hace uso de la definición.

    Asimismo, hubo un debate sobre si las instituciones, organizaciones y entidades que proporcionan o reciben materiales biológicos en conformidad con el Marco podrían buscar reivindicar DPI de estos materiales. Estados Unidos indicó en una sesión plenaria que quiere asegurarse de que el Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material no afectará “las obligaciones o restricciones que imponen” los DPI. Brasil intervino igualmente para decir que quiere garantías de que no se reivindicarán DPI sobre materiales biológicos compartidos con arreglo al sistema.

    Nigeria dijo que podría aceptar la PI si se otorgan licencias exentas de regalías a petición de los países en desarrollo “en todo momento […] para utilizar los procesos o productos desarrollados a partir de […] materiales biológicos” compartidos de conformidad con el Marco.

    El Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material es un acuerdo obligatorio en forma de anexo de un marco de recomendaciones no vinculante, explicó un participante. Esto agrega un elemento contradictorio en la negociación y, según otra fuente, significa que los aspectos del Marco que no se contemplen en el Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material tendrán mucho menos peso.

    Durante la última sesión plenaria se decidió suspender la reunión intergubernamental y celebrarla al mismo tiempo que la próxima Asamblea Mundial de la Salud, programada actualmente para mayo de 2009. El informe de la reunión sobre los progresos realizados indica que la reunión intergubernamental así como dos Grupos de Trabajo han avanzado en relación con el texto de la Presidencia, el cual es un proyecto de Marco de preparación para una gripe pandémica para el intercambio de virus gripales y el acceso a las vacunas y otros beneficios. Además, casi se han terminado una serie de principios orientadores para el Marco, entre los cuales se destaca el compromiso de intercambiar virus y compartir beneficios.

    Mientras tanto, se ha solicitado al Director General que emprenda varias medidas técnicas con vistas a prepararse para la continuación del período de sesiones, entre otras cosas, que lleve a cabo el trabajo necesario para perfeccionar un sistema de rastreo de los virus, preparar los mandatos para los Centros Colaboradores, los Laboratorios de Referencia de la OMS para el H5, los Laboratorios reguladores «esenciales» y los Centros Nacionales de la Gripe de la Red OMS, así como también elaborar una versión revisada de la parte técnica del Acuerdo Modelo de Transferencia de Material y un informe que identifique las necesidades y las prioridades (incluidas las opciones de financiación) en cuanto a los beneficios propuestos en el texto del Marco de preparación para una gripe pandémica.

    Traducido del inglés por Analín Pedroni

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.196.132.201