SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Interns Summer 2013

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »
  • If this goes ahead, as the EU will "speak" for all... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Sistema de revisión abierta de solicitudes de patentes puede convertirse en modelo para las oficinas de patentes

    Published on 12 December 2008 @ 1:50 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Liza Porteus Viana para Intellectual Property Watch
    Un sistema piloto de revisión abierta de solicitudes de patentes en Estados Unidos podría servir como modelo para las oficinas de patentes de todo el mundo.

    La New York Law School (NYLS), en colaboración con la Oficina de Patentes y Marcas de Estados Unidos (USPTO), emprende el segundo año de la innovadora iniciativa Peer To Patent , que abre el proceso de examen de patentes al público. El sistema en línea permite que el público presente elementos del estado de la técnica a fin de evaluar las reivindicaciones de solicitudes de patentes en trámite. El objetivo es proporcionar a los evaluadores de las patentes la mayor cantidad de información disponible y, a la postre, procurar mejorar la calidad de las patentes que se conceden.

    Durante el primer año de la iniciativa piloto, el enfoque se centró en las patentes de programas informáticos y productos tecnológicos; para el segundo año, que comenzó en julio, se pretende centrarlo en las patentes respecto de métodos comerciales.

    En el caso de los métodos comerciales, el estado de la técnica más completo generalmente no se encuentra en la literatura sobre patentes, sino en bases de datos que, quizás, los evaluadores de patentes de la USPTO no conozcan o a las cuales no tengan acceso. Además, muchas empresas prefieren no divulgar información sobre sus métodos y técnicas.

    “Las patentes respecto de métodos comerciales son, en cierta medida, singulares en las invenciones que se presentan”, por ejemplo, los métodos de informes fiscales, contables y de seguros, dijo John Doll, Comisionado de Patentes de EE. UU., a Intellectual Property Watch. “Esto brinda al público que comprende este sector de los negocios la oportunidad de presentar los elementos del estado de la técnica pertinentes”.

    Hasta el momento, se han examinado 88 solicitudes mediante este sistema. De las 46 solicitudes que llegaron a la USPTO para su revisión inicial, los evaluadores citaron siete elementos del estado de la técnica que se presentaron a través de la iniciativa Peer to Patent. En otras ocho solicitudes se hizo uso del estado de la técnica hallado por el evaluador y los miembros del sistema de revisión abierta. La empresa de inversiones Goldman Sachs presentó una solicitud de patente respecto de un método comercial para un sistema electrónico que genera una red de compradores y vendedores de productos básicos, la cual permite que los usuarios operen en el marco de todas las directrices bancarias federales.

    Se alienta a los innovadores a presentar hasta 25 solicitudes de patentes en el segundo año, en comparación con las 15 del año previo.

    El sistema es beneficioso para los innovadores, dado que solicitudes de patentes de mayor calidad y mayores recursos disponibles para los evaluadores se traducen en la concesión de patentes más fuertes. Mientras menor sea la calidad de la patente, habrá mayores posibilidades de que culmine en los tribunales. El proceso de los litigios es costoso, al igual que los acuerdos extrajudiciales.

    “Existe la gran preocupación de que se aprueben numerosas patentes que, en realidad, no merecen serlo”, señaló Manny Schecter, Asesor Jurídico General en materia de propiedad intelectual de IBM, uno de los principales patrocinadores. “Las empresas gastan miles de millones de dólares cada año para defenderse de infracciones de patentes que se reivindican contra ellas, y las patentes resultan ser inválidas; esto va en menoscabo de la economía”.

    El mayor desafío, explicó Chris Wong, Director de Proyectos, es incrementar la participación; este año nos pondremos en contacto con ejecutivos de licencias y otros interesados en la protección por patente de métodos comerciales.

    “El primer año, nos centramos en determinar si el sistema de revisión abierta era realmente valioso… Hemos demostrado que lo es”, afirmó Wong. “Ya no realizamos la ‘venta agresiva’ de la iniciativa Peer to Patent, a lo sumo decimos ‘debería participar’ y ‘¿de qué manera podemos lograr que más personas participen en esto?’”.

    Interés internacional

    Otros países han seguido el ejemplo de Estados Unidos. Durante el verano boreal, la Oficina de Patentes de Japón lanzó su propia versión de un sistema de revisión denominado Community Patent Review (Revisión de patentes de la comunidad). En dicho sistema, administrado por el Institute of Intellectual Property (IIP) de Japón, se han examinado 39 solicitudes de patentes; todavía ninguna de ellas ha sido sometida a la revisión completa de la Oficina de Patentes de este país. Está previsto que la evaluación de las solicitudes finalice el próximo mes, según informó Takashi Ishihara, investigador del IIP.

    Posteriormente los investigadores analizarán los resultados y elaborarán informes sobre su éxito.

    Antes de lanzar Community Patent Review, Japón realizó consultas con la NYLS acerca del funcionamiento de la iniciativa Peer to Patent, las actividades de acercamiento a la comunidad y maneras de evaluar el proceso.

    “Hasta ahora, no existen obstáculos significativos en el proceso”, afirmó Ishihara. “Lo que deseamos es que más revisores activos participen en Community Patent Review”.

    Asimismo, la NYLS evalúa un proyecto piloto similar junto con la Oficina de Propiedad Intelectual del Reino Unido. La aprobación final del acuerdo se espera para dentro de los próximos días. La Oficina Europea de Patentes tiene conocimiento de la iniciativa Peer to Patent, pero, hasta el momento, no ha expresado demasiado interés por lanzar un proyecto similar.

    Mark Webbink, Director Ejecutivo del Center for Patent Innovations de la NYLS, afirmó que se están llevando a cabo “debates iniciales” con algunas oficinas de patentes acerca de un sistema de revisión abierta. Sin embargo, dichas deliberaciones son aún muy prematuras y apuntan principalmente a instruir a otras oficinas en su labor.

    “Evidentemente otras oficinas nacionales de patentes muestran interés por adoptar el mismo tipo de enfoque”, sostuvo Webbink. “Hallar todos los elementos del estado de la técnica siempre ha sido parte de la premisa del programa: poder establecer contacto con otras oficinas internacionales de patentes, además de la oficina de patentes estadounidense, dado que todas afrontan problemas similares en torno a algunas de las nuevas tecnologías”.

    Si bien son pocos los que critican las aspiraciones de Peer to Patent (se celebra toda contribución que pueda mejorar el proceso de examen de patentes), algunos se muestran escépticos respecto del nivel de asistencia que se brindará.

    Michael J. Meurer, profesor de derecho de la Boston University School of Law, respalda el experimento y espera que éste mejore el proceso, pero le preocupa que la tarea poco glamorosa que deben efectuar los revisores de las solicitudes debilite el interés. “Muchas personas” comparten esta preocupación, manifestó.

    También señaló que el sistema “no soluciona el problema más grave que afronta el sistema de patentes”, es decir, no se sabe con certeza qué derechos de propiedad se reivindican y muchas patentes se interpretan de manera demasiado amplia. Un evaluador puede interpretar una solicitud en forma limitada, observar el estado de la técnica y decidir que no es pertinente; sin embargo, es posible que un tribunal posteriormente analice la reivindicación de manera más amplia. Asimismo, considera que más sanciones deberían imponerse a las solicitudes de mala calidad.

    El sistema de patentes debería funcionar como un régimen de propiedad, afirmó Meurer, autor del libro “Do Patents Work? The empirical evidence that today’s patents fail as property and discourage innovation, and how they might be fixed” (¿Funcionan las patentes? La prueba empírica de que las patentes de la actualidad fracasan como propiedad y ponen freno a la innovación, y cómo podrían mejorarse).

    “Para comprobar que uno es propietario de un lote de tierra, se puede consultar la escritura, que está a disposición del público, se puede visitar la propiedad… Como el derecho de bienes inmuebles es relativamente estable y predecible, es posible descifrar qué propiedad, qué tierra poseo”, explicó. “Si se desea realizar una inversión que implique un lote de tierra, se pueden llevar a cabo operaciones en las propiedades colindantes, efectuar inversiones que no interfieran en mis derechos, o yo podría vender mis derechos”.

    Meurer agregó: “En muchos casos, el sistema de patentes realiza ambas acciones de manera ineficiente”.

    Para este artículo se contó con la colaboración de Paul Volodarsky.

    Traducido del inglés por Fernanda Nieto Femenia

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.196.23.239