SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Pascal Lamy invite les membres de l’OMC mécontents à utiliser le réexamen de l’Accord sur les ADPIC et la santé publique

    Published on 12 December 2008 @ 6:58 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Par William New
    Mardi, face aux allégations de longue date qui nient l’efficacité des règles de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) visant à améliorer l’accès aux médicaments dans les pays pauvres, le Directeur général de l’OMC, Pascal Lamy, a appelé les membres mécontents à utiliser le mécanisme de réexamen annuel de ces règles.

    « C’est précisément pour régler ce genre de situations que les membres de l’OMC ont créé le système de réexamen périodique », a expliqué M. Lamy lors d’un rassemblement de l’industrie des génériques. « Je tiens à préciser que les membres de l’OMC n’ont manifesté aucune préoccupation lors du dernier réexamen annuel. Avec le Groupe africain à leur tête, ils ont même réaffirmé leur soutien au système deux ans après son adoption ».

    C’est lors de la 11e conférence annuelle de l’alliance internationale du médicament générique (International Generic Pharmaceutical Alliance), qui s’est déroulée à Genève du 8 au 10 décembre, que M. Lamy s’est exprimé. Son mandat de quatre ans en tant que Directeur général de l’OMC se terminera à la fin de l’année prochaine, après quoi il se présentera pour un nouveau mandat qu’il semble pour l’instant être le seul à briguer.

    L’Accord de l’OMC sur les aspects des droits de propriété intellectuelle qui touchent au commerce (Accord sur les ADPIC), qui date de 1994, établit les règles d’accès aux médicaments. En août 2003, le Conseil général de l’OMC a adopté une décision relative à la mise en œuvre du paragraphe 6 de la déclaration de Doha de 2001 sur l’Accord sur les ADPIC et la santé publique. Le paragraphe 6 appelle à résoudre le problème des pays qui manquent de moyens pour fabriquer des produits pharmaceutiques et qui ont besoin d’accéder à des médicaments bon marché grâce à des licences obligatoires. Cette décision de 2003 a créé une dérogation à la règle de l’OMC qui spécifie que les produits fabriqués sous licence obligatoire doivent être utilisés principalement pour l’approvisionnement du marché intérieur.

    Le paragraphe 8 de la décision de 2003 indique que Conseil des ADPIC devra réexaminer chaque année le fonctionnement du système décrit dans la présente décision afin d’assurer son application effective et présenter chaque année un rapport sur son application au Conseil général.

    Selon M. Lamy, jusqu’à présent, aucun pays n’a exprimé de préoccupation dans le cadre de ce réexamen.

    Après le discours du Directeur général, le porte-parole d’un pays en développement a, quant à lui, mis en doute la pertinence du processus de réexamen. « Quel réexamen ? a-t-il contesté. Il n’y a pas de vrai réexamen ».

    En cinq ans, seul un pays en développement a eu recours au processus du paragraphe 6. Il s’agissait du Rwanda, en septembre, avec le Canada. Les défenseurs de la santé ont affirmé à plusieurs reprises que la dérogation était trop mal formulée pour être utile et efficace.

    Lorsqu’Intellectual Property Watch a demandé à M. Lamy si les pays développés exerçaient une forme de pression sur les États plus modestes pour les dissuader de faire usage des souplesses du système, ce dernier a répondu que l’exemple du Rwanda prouvait le contraire.

    Par ailleurs, dans son discours, M. Lamy n’a pas exclu que les processus d’amélioration constante de l’OMC pourraient finalement conduire à des changements plus importants. « Comme n’importe quel accord de l’OMC, le système du paragraphe 6 doit être régulièrement réexaminé. Des leçons doivent être tirées de ces évaluations afin de permettre à l’OMC de continuer à utiliser ce processus pour contribuer à améliorer l’accès aux médicaments », a-t-il déclaré.

    Les fabricants de médicaments génériques sont souvent sceptiques vis-à-vis des règles de protection des titulaires de brevets qui, pour la plupart, se trouvent dans les pays développés. Ces dernières années, les critiques ont dénoncé de plus en plus vivement le fait que les brevets empêchent la distribution efficace des médicaments essentiels aux plus pauvres.

    Cependant, la réponse de M. Lamy face à ces accusations a été celle souvent avancée par l’industrie des marques : les droits de propriété intellectuelle « ne constituent qu’un rouage du mécanisme qui détermine le niveau d’accès aux médicaments dans un pays ». Les autres éléments incluent les infrastructures et le système national de santé, ou encore les modes d’approvisionnement. M. Lamy a par ailleurs repris l’argument évoqué par l’industrie qui dénonce les problèmes posés par les droits de douane sur les importations de produits de santé, puis il a évoqué la nécessité de renforcer la protection contre les contrefaçons.

    Autres points de vue

    D’autres participants à la conférence ont mis l’accent sur les inconvénients que présentent le système actuel de propriété intellectuelle et les ADPIC en matière d’accès aux médicaments. Michelle Childs, de Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), a dénoncé la pratique du « patent linkage » (mise en lien avec le brevet), qui consiste pour les industries pharmaceutiques américaines et européennes à faire pression sur les autorités de réglementation des médicaments afin de lier l’autorisation de mise sur le marché de médicaments génériques au statut du brevet qui protège le produit de référence. Cette méthode a pour effet le renforcement sans discernement des brevets ; elle va à l’encontre de l’utilisation de la flexibilité permise par l’Accord sur les ADPIC et constitue une disposition ADPIC-plus, a-t-elle signalé.

    Mme Childs a ensuite mentionné une proposition de communauté de brevets appliquée aux médicaments, proposée par UNITAID et approuvée par les organes clés de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé. Selon elle, cette proposition est porteuse de profits pour les fabricants de médicaments génériques.

    Certains intervenants, parmi lesquels Christoph Spennemann de la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le commerce et le développement, ont décrit l’impact de l’exclusivité des données sur la production de médicaments génériques. Par le passé, certaines entreprises ont réussi à obtenir des droits exclusifs sur les résultats de leurs essais pendant 5 à 10 ans, ce qui a retardé la commercialisation des génériques même après l’expiration des brevets.

    Julia Pike, directrice du service de propriété intellectuelle et juriste au sein du groupe de distribution de médicaments génériques Hospira, a témoigné de la bataille juridique qui fait rage entre l’industrie des marques et celle des génériques. Yehuda Livneh, conseiller juridique spécialiste des brevets chez Teva Pharmaceutical, une entreprise de production de génériques, et Mme Pike ont expliqué que pour dissuader les titulaires de brevets d’abuser de leurs droits, il est nécessaire de leur faire prendre la mesure des pertes financières qu’ils subiront s’ils perdent une affaire. Prendre l’exemple de tiers et évaluer les dégâts causés permet de mieux apprécier les enjeux. Pourtant, comme l’a fait remarquer un participant, Teva a remporté une grosse affaire contre Abbot aux Pays-Bas mais, pour Abbot, le coût ne s’est pas avéré très élevé.

    S’exprimant en son nom, Roger Kampf, de l’OMC, a émis des doutes sur le fait que les industries seraient attirées par l’idée d’une communauté de brevets, avant d’ajouter que la proposition de Mme Pike de créer un cadre européen de règlement des litiges grâce à des procédures communes constituerait une mesure ADPIC-plus. « Cela prouve que les propositions ADPIC-plus n’émanent pas toujours de l’industrie de la recherche et du développement, mais qu’elles peuvent aussi provenir de temps en temps de votre côté », a-t-il lancé.

    Enfin, un participant chinois a présenté des statistiques montrant qu’en 2012, l’industrie des génériques de la Chine se placerait au deuxième rang mondial derrière celle des États-Unis.

    Lamy : le « gardien de la flexibilité de l’Accord sur les ADPIC »

    Lors de la conférence, M. Lamy a réaffirmé le droit des membres de l’OMC à utiliser les mécanismes de flexibilité de l’Accord sur les ADPIC pour des raisons de santé publique. Ces mécanismes sont très importants pour l’industrie du générique et l’un des organisateurs a donc surnommé M. Lamy le « gardien de la flexibilité de l’Accord sur les ADPIC ».

    Le Directeur général de l’OMC a reconnu que les dispositions dites « ADPIC-plus », dont la portée dépasse ce qui a été convenu dans l’Accord sur les ADPIC, peuvent avoir un impact négatif sur les accords bilatéraux passés avec de petits pays. « Effectivement, certaines dispositions pourraient avoir une influence sur l’accès aux médicaments et sur l’industrie du générique », a-t-il déclaré. Cependant, les pays développés qui souhaitent faire appliquer de telles dispositions ont récemment insisté sur le fait qu’elles « ne sont pas destinées à empêcher les parties de prendre des mesures de protection de la santé publique ».

    Finalement, M. Lamy a invité l’industrie des génériques, qui détient une grande part du marché mondial, à participer davantage aux débats sur l’accès aux médicaments en tant qu’acteur de ce domaine. La situation s’est améliorée, mais il reste encore beaucoup à faire.

    « Nous sommes disposés à remettre les choses en question, à examiner ce qui est efficace et ce qui ne l’est pas et à en tirer des leçons », a conclu M. Lamy. « Pour le reste, j’accepte d’être considéré comme le gardien de la flexibilité de l’Accord sur les ADPIC ».

    Négociations à l’OMC : les ADPIC sur la touche

    Pendant ce temps, à l’OMC, les questions liées aux ADPIC semblent avoir été laissées de côté alors que les négociations sur l’agriculture et les biens industriels progressent et que l’organisation d’une conférence ministérielle la semaine prochaine est en train d’être décidée. Le ministre norvégien des Affaires étrangères, Jonas Store, a une nouvelle fois été sollicité par M. Lamy pour diriger les discussions relatives aux ADPIC. Cependant, selon le porte-parole d’un pays ayant proposé un amendement de l’Accord sur les ADPIC, le ministre préfère attendre de venir dans le cadre de ses fonctions.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Griselda Jung

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.211.1.204