SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Latest Comments
  • So simply put, we have the NABP saying that all ph... »
  • The original Brustle decision was widely criticise... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Droits de propriété intellectuelle et organismes génétiquement modifiés : une combinaison fatale selon les activistes

    Published on 9 December 2008 @ 8:44 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Par Catherine Saez
    L’extension des brevets aux organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM) et leur production dans de nombreux pays menacent les droits des agriculteurs et la biodiversité, la sécurité alimentaire dépendant de plus en plus d’une poignée d’entreprises transnationales de biotechnologie, selon les intervenants à un atelier qui s’est déroulé récemment à Genève.

    L’atelier a été organisé par l’association 3D -> Trade – Human Rights – Equitable Economy en marge d’une manifestation qui s’est tenue du 24 au 26 novembre à l’initiative de l’Institut pour une politique de l’agriculture et du commerce (IATP) sur le thème de l’impact du commerce et de l’investissement sur le droit à l’alimentation.

    Les droits de propriété intellectuelle, qui pendant longtemps ne s’appliquaient pas au domaine de l’agriculture, sont au coeur de l’expansion des OGM. Avant l’adoption de l’Accord de l’OMC sur les aspects des droits de propriété intellectuelle qui touchent au commerce (ADPIC), les pays avaient la possibilité d’exclure certains secteurs industriels et technologiques de la protection des droits de propriété intellectuelle. Selon Sangeeta Shashikant de Third World Network, la plupart des pays avaient choisi d’exclure les produits pharmaceutiques, l’alimentation et les boissons.

    L’article 27.3b est l’un des articles les plus controversés de l’Accord sur les ADPIC. Cet article prévoit que les membres pourront exclure de la brevetabilité «les végétaux et les animaux autres que les micro-organismes, et les procédés essentiellement biologiques d’obtention de végétaux ou d’animaux, autres que les procédés non biologiques et microbiologiques », mais leur demande de prévoir la protection des variétés végétales par des brevets ou par un système sui generis efficace. D’après Sangeeta Shashikant, il favorise l’industrie des biotechnologies des pays développés dans la mesure où il exige l’octroi de brevets sur des mirco-organismes, domaine dans lequel ces pays bénéficient d’un avantage.

    «La question est de savoir si cette règle s’applique aux organismes génétiquement modifiés et pas aux microorganismes naturels », s’est-elle interrogée, ajoutant que la définition proposée de la notion de micro-organisme ne permettait pas de donner une réponse claire.

    Une procédure de réexamen est en cours concernant l’article 27.3b et certains pays, notamment le Brésil, l’Inde et la Thaïlande demandent à ce qu’il soit clarifié, à précisé Sangeeta Shashikant.

    Les accords bilatéraux de libre échange permettent également de réduire les flexibilités prévues dans l’accord sur les ADPIC. Ainsi, les accords de libre échange conclus par les Etats-Unis exigent la ratification de la dernière version de la Convention internationale pour la protection des nouvelles variétés de plantes (UPOV), connue sous le nom de UPOV 91, qui a été adoptée en 1991. Cette convention est la quatrième version de la convention qui a été adoptée pour la première fois en 1961. Son objectif est, selon le site Internet, la protection des obtentions végétales par un droit de propriété intellectuelle.

    Selon Maria Julia Oliva, du Centre international pour le commerce et le développement durable (ICTSD), chaque version de la convention adoptée au cours des dernières décennies a contribué à renforcer les droits des semenciers au détriment des fermiers traditionnels en matière de recherche et de développement. L’UPOV 91 leur confère une protection importante et « prévoit pour la première fois la possibilité d’une double protection des variétés de plantes au moyen d’un certificat en admettant l’idée que les pays pourront, voire devront, accorder une protection additionnelle par le biais de brevets . Les flexibilités qui existaient concernant les certificats de plantes ont disparu avec ce système. »

    Un manque de transparence?

    Le principal problème pour la société civile consiste à trouver un moyen de participer davantage aux discussions concernant l’UPOV et aux débats qui ont lieu au sein de l’Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle. Il est relativement aisé de participer aux débats au sein de l’OMPI; obtenir un statut d’observateur n’est pas trop difficile et le Plan d’action de l’OMPI pour le développement (qui a été adopté récemment afin d’intégrer la composante de développement dans tous les travaux de l’Organisation) montre que l’adoption d’une approche proactive peut s’avérer payante, a indiqué Maria Julia Oliva. L’accès à l’UPOV est autrement plus difficile. «Seuls les semencier peuvent participer aux discussions», a-t-elle précisé.

    «Aucun membre de la société civile n’est représentée dans l’UPOV et la plupart des documents ne sont pas accessibles au grand public», a indiqué Sangeeta Shashikant. L’UPOV ne donne pas vraiment lieu à des discussions. Les décisions sont adoptées rapidement et les pays qui souhaitent devenir membres doivent s’assurer que leur législation sont conformes aux règles de la Convention. D’après elle, le problème est d’autant plus important que de plus en plus de pays ont signé l’UPOV 91.

    Selon un participant, un certain nombre de pays en développement membres de l’UPOV (bien que liés par l’accord de 1978) abritent de grandes industries agroalimentaires, ce qui explique que contrairement à la plupart des autres aspects de propriété intellectuelle en discussion à l’OMPI, des divergences de vue importantes existent entre les pays en développement sur cette question.

    L’UPOV soumet régulièrement des rapports au Conseil des ADPIC de l’OMC sur ses activités en matière de coopération technique. Ces rapports contiennent de nombreuses informations sur les pays bénéficiant des conseils juridiques de l’UPOV, ainsi que des compte rendus des séminaires, ateliers et formations organisés par les pays en développement, a indiqué ce participant. «Nous disposons de beaucoup d’informations qui peuvent être analysées et utilisées pour défendre nos intérêts et contribuer aux discussions», a-t-il ajouté.

    La nécessité d’une assistance technique

    L’Accord sur les ADPIC a prévu de nouvelles protections dans des domaines auxquels les pays en développement n’étaient pas habitués. La protection des variétés de plantes est un domaine dans lequel la plupart de ces pays avaient peu d’expertise, a déclaré Ahmed Abdel Latif, responsable des questions concernant les droits de propriété intellectuelle au Centre international pour le commerce et le développement durable. Nombre d’entre eux ont demandé à bénéficier d’une assistance technique, notamment de conseils juridiques, lors de l’élaboration des lois nationales de mise en œuvre des obligations de l’Accord.

    L’Article 27.3b donne aux pays en développement la possibilité de choisir la manière de protéger les variétés de plantes, sans définir a priori quel système ils devraient adopter, a-t-il indiqué.

    «Dans cette perspective, l’adoption du Plan d’action de l’OMPI pour le développement représente une avancée positive dans la mesure où elle garantit que les conseils dispensés aux pays en développement concernant la mise en œuvre de leurs obligations internationales tiendront compte des flexibilités contenues dans l’Accord sur les ADPIC, notamment dans le domaine de la protection des différentes variétés de plantes où l’approche choisie par ces pays doit être guidée avant tout par leurs niveaux de développement, leurs priorités et leurs besoins », a commenté Ahmed Abdel Latif à Intellectual Property Watch.

    Les brevets : un moyen pour les grandes entreprises de biotechnologie d’étendre leur influence

    Sans les droits de propriété, les organismes génétiquement modifiés n’auraient pu s’étendre de manière aussi large et rapide, selon Sarojeni Rengam, directrice du Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Asia and the Pacific. [Correction: le nom de cette intervenante a été incorrectement transmis comme étant Esther Bett de l’organisation Resources Oriented Development Initiatives au Kenya, le nom correct de l'intervenante a été inséré dans le reste de l'article]. Les grandes entreprises sont en train de consolider leur position sur le marché des semences, à l’image de Monsanto, qui contrôle aujourd’hui 33 pour cent du marché mondial. En 2007, 10 sociétés contrôlaient 67 pour cent du marché des semences dont la valeur est estimée à 22 milliards de dollars. Non seulement Monsanto achète des entreprises locales de semences, mais la société concède également des licences sur ses organismes génétiquement modifiés à d’autres entreprises.

    Selon Sarojeni Rengam, de nouvelles tendances se font jour dans le domaine des brevets sur l’agriculture, notamment en ce qui concerne la sélection de caractères génétiques qui permet aux semenciers de breveter deux ou trois caractéristiques de la même plante. C’est le cas du maïs génétiquement modifié de Mosanto qui comprend deux gènes insecticides et un gène tolérant aux herbicides.

    Les licences obligatoires sont également en augmentation; elles s’accompagnent d’une plus grande collaboration entre les grandes entreprises qui souhaitent réduire les coûts liés aux revendications de brevet afin de consolider leur pouvoir et d’étendre leurs parts de marché dans les pays en développement, a indiqué Sarojeni Rengam. Monsanto et BASF ont annoncé avoir conclu un projet de collaboration d’une valeur de 1,5 milliard de dollars dans le domaine de la recherche et du développement. «Il en résultera une augmentation des prix pour les fermiers mais aussi une réduction des possibilités qui seront offertes et un manque d’innovation sur le marché», a-t-elle précisé.

    Enfin, a-t-elle conclu, on assiste à une augmentation massive de brevets portant sur ce que l’on appelle les gènes climatiques. Les entreprises cherchent à acquérir un monopole sur les brevets de plantes capables de résister à des conditions climatiques difficiles telles que la sécheresse ou les problèmes de salinité. À ce jour, plus de 500 brevets ont été déposés par des entreprises telles que Monsanto, BASF, DuPont, Syngenta et Bayer. Malgré l’engagement marqué de ces entreprises envers la protection de l’environnement, l’utilisation des pesticides est en augmentation constante, faisant peser des risques sur la santé humaine, selon les participants à l’atelier.

    Forte opposition à la brevetabilité des semences traditionnelles et des ressources animales

    Les semences traditionnelles et les ressources animales sont directement concernés par les brevets, a indiqué Christina Goethe de Swissaid. Des centaines de brevets portant sur ces aspects ont été déposés à l’Office européen (OEB) et une affaire importante est actuellement en cours d’examen devant la Chambre de recours élargie de l’Office. Cette affaire, connue sous le nom « d’affaire du brocoli », concerne un brevet portant sur un procédé permettant d’obtenir des nouvelles variétés de brassica, en particulier de brocolis. Les brevets ont été contestés par deux sociétés dont la société française Limagrain.

    Cinq organisations non gouvernementales (la Déclaration de Berne, Greenpeace, Swissaid, Misereor et Kein Patent auf Leben) ont lancé un appel mondial et ont écrit une lettre conjointe à la Chambre de recours élargie de l’OEB afin de rappeler leur opposition à la brevetabilité de semences traditionnelles et de ressources animales. Ils se sont joints à plus de 50 organisations de fermiers et espèrent recevoir le soutien des grandes organisations de défense des agriculteurs partout dans le monde.

    Ces organisations considèrent que la décision rendue par la Chambre de recours élargie constituera un précédent pour toutes les demandes ultérieures de brevets portant sur des plantes cultivées à partir de méthodes traditionnelles et des ressources animales.

    Traduit de l’anglais par Véronique Sauron

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.226.188.142