SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Quantitative Analysis Of Contributions To NETMundial Meeting

A quantitative analysis of the 187 submissions to the April NETmundial conference on the future of internet governance shows broad support for improving security, ensuring respect for privacy, ensuring freedom of expression, and globalizing the IANA function, analyst Richard Hill writes.


Latest Comments
  • Why should anyone care what James Anaya thinks? In... »
  • If this goes ahead, as the EU will "speak" for all... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Propiedad intelectual y organismos modificados genéticamente: una combinación que los activistas consideran fatídica

    Published on 8 December 2008 @ 12:11 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Catherine Saez
    Según los oradores de un reciente taller llevado a cabo en Ginebra, debido a la expansión del alcance de las patentes de organismos modificados genéticamente (OMG) y la aplicación de dichos cultivos en la mayoría de los países, los derechos de los agricultores y la biodiversidad están en riesgo, mientras que la seguridad alimentaria ha pasado a depender de unas pocas empresas biotecnológicas transnacionales.

    3D -> Trade – Human Rights – Equitable Economy presentó dicho taller durante un evento sobre el impacto del comercio y las inversiones en el derecho a los alimentos organizado por el Institute for Trade and Agriculture Policy del 24 al 26 de noviembre.

    Los derechos de propiedad intelectual constituyen un aspecto fundamental de la expansión de los OMG, aunque la agricultura no siempre estuvo amparada por tales derechos. Según señaló Sangeeta Shashikant de Third World Network, antes de la existencia del Acuerdo sobre los Aspectos de los Derechos de la Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio (ADPIC), los países podían excluir algunos sectores industriales y tecnológicos de la protección de la propiedad intelectual, y, en su mayoría, los sectores elegidos eran los medicamentos, los alimentos y las bebidas.

    En el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC, uno de los artículos más controvertidos es el 27.3b. Dicho artículo está relacionado con el derecho de los miembros a excluir de la patentabilidad “las plantas y los animales excepto los microorganismos, y los procedimientos esencialmente biológicos para la producción de plantas o animales, que no sean procedimientos no biológicos o microbiológicos”, pero, a su vez, exige la protección de las variedades de plantas, ya sea mediante patentes o a través de un sistema sui generis eficaz. Según afirmó Shashikant, el artículo favoreció la industria biotecnológica de los países desarrollados al exigir la concesión de patentes de microorganismos, lo que, en el caso de estos países, constituye una ventaja.

    “La cuestión reside en determinar si esto se aplica a los organismos modificados genéticamente y no a los microorganismos naturales”, expresó, y agregó que la definición de microorganismos no deja en claro a qué se hace referencia.

    Actualmente el artículo 27.3b se encuentra bajo revisión y algunos países, tales como Brasil, la India y Tailandia, solicitan mayor claridad en éste, sostuvo.

    Por otra parte, los acuerdos de libre comercio bilaterales también llevan a una reducción de las flexibilidades previstas en el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC, reflexionó. Por ejemplo, los acuerdos de libre comercio de Estados Unidos requieren de la ratificación de la última acta del Convenio Internacional para la Protección de las Obtenciones Vegetales (Unión Internacional para la Protección de las Obtenciones Vegetales [UPOV]), conocido como Convenio UPOV 91, desde su adopción en 1991. Ésta es la cuarta acta del convenio [pdf en inglés] desde su entrada en vigor en 1961. El principal objeto de la UPOV, según se desprende de su sitio de Internet, es “proteger las obtenciones vegetales por medio de los derechos de propiedad intelectual”.

    En las últimas décadas, cada versión del convenio ha fortalecido los derechos de los cultivadores de plantas a expensas de los agricultores tradicionales o de mayores actividades de investigación y desarrollo, sostuvo Maria Julia Oliva del Centro Internacional para el Comercio y el Desarrollo Sostenible (ICTSD). El Convenio UPOV 91 confiere una importante protección a los cultivadores de plantas y “por primera vez permite la doble protección de las variedades de plantas, es decir, no solamente el certificado de obtención vegetal, sino también el reconocimiento de que los países concederán, conceden y, quizás, hasta deberían conceder patentes como protección adicional. Sea cual fuere el grado de flexibilidad disponible con los certificados de obtención vegetal, se está perdiendo en el marco de este sistema”.

    ¿Una UPOV poco transparente?

    El principal problema de la sociedad civil es hallar la mejor manera de interactuar con la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual (OMPI) y la UPOV. Participar en la OMPI es bastante sencillo, obtener la condición de observador no presenta mayores dificultades y el Programa para el Desarrollo de la OMPI (recientemente aprobado para conferir una dimensión de desarrollo a toda la labor realizada en el seno del organismo) constituye un buen ejemplo de cómo puede funcionar un enfoque anticipatorio, sostuvo Oliva. Por otro lado, la participación en la UPOV ha demostrado ser por demás difícil. “Es necesario cultivar plantas para poder participar”, manifestó.

    “En la UPOV, no existe representación de la sociedad civil de interés público y la mayoría de los documentos de dicho organismo no se encuentran disponibles públicamente”, afirmó Shashikant. “La UPOV no entabla realmente debates. Las decisiones se adoptan rápidamente y los países que desean ser miembros deben asegurarse de que sus leyes guarden conformidad con las normas de la UPOV. Esto se está convirtiendo en un gran problema a medida que aumenta la cantidad de países signatarios del Convenio UPOV 91”, concluyó.

    Según informó un participante, existen varios países en desarrollo con importantes industrias agroalimentarias que son miembros de la UPOV (aunque, en su mayoría, están regidos por el Convenio UPOV 1978), situación que propicia una mayor diversidad en la posición de los países en desarrollo, en comparación con los demás asuntos de propiedad intelectual que se abordan en la OMPI.

    La UPOV presenta informes periódicos ante el Consejo de los ADPIC de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) acerca de las actividades de cooperación técnica que lleva a cabo. Dichos informes contienen vasta información sobre los países a los que la UPOV presta asesoramiento legislativo, así como sobre los seminarios, los talleres y las actividades de capacitación que organiza en los países en desarrollo, señaló el participante. “Es abundante el material disponible que se puede utilizar y analizar a los fines de fomentar la promoción y la participación”, manifestó.

    La asistencia técnica es clave para la aplicación del Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC

    El Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC incluyó nuevas áreas de protección de la propiedad intelectual con las que muchos de los países en desarrollo no estaban familiarizados, y la protección de las variedades de plantas fue una de las áreas en las que la mayoría de estos países exhibieron pocos conocimientos técnicos, afirmó Ahmed Abdel Latif, Director del Programa de Propiedad Intelectual del ICTSD. Por lo tanto, muchos países en desarrollo se basaron en gran medida en la asistencia técnica y, específicamente, en el asesoramiento legislativo a la hora de elaborar las leyes nacionales para cumplir con las obligaciones estipuladas en el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC.

    El artículo 27.3b brinda a los países en desarrollo la posibilidad de seleccionar la forma de proteger las variedades de plantas, pero no define qué sistema sui generis deben adoptar, agregó.

    “Desde esta perspectiva, el Programa para el Desarrollo de la OMPI representa un adelanto positivo que procura garantizar que el asesoramiento provisto a los países en desarrollo para que cumplan con sus obligaciones internacionales integre las flexibilidades estipuladas en el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC, incluso en áreas como la protección de las variedades de plantas, donde la elección del enfoque de protección por parte de los países en desarrollo debe obedecer principalmente a su nivel de desarrollo, sus prioridades y sus necesidades”, declaró posteriormente Latif a Intellectual Property Watch.

    Las grandes empresas biotecnológicas amplían su influencia por medio de patentes

    Sin la existencia de derechos de propiedad intelectual, los OMG no podrían haberse extendido con tal amplitud y rapidez, señaló Sarojeni Rengam, Directora Ejecutiva de Pesticide Action Network (PAN) de Asia y el Pacífico. [Corrección: se propocionó incorrectamente el nombre de esta oradora como Esther Bett de Resources Oriented Development Initiatives de Kenya. Se ha insertado el nombre correcto a lo largo del artículo]. Las grandes empresas han consolidado su influencia en el mercado de las semillas, como es el caso de Monsanto, que en la actualidad cuenta con el 33% del mercado mundial de semillas, sostuvo. En 2007, 10 empresas controlaban el 67% de un mercado de $22 mil millones de dólares estadounidenses. Monsanto no solamente adquiere empresas de semillas locales en su esfuerzo de expansión, sino que, además, concede licencias de semillas modificadas genéticamente a otras empresas

    Algunas nuevas tendencias comienzan a observarse en la protección por patente de los productos agrícolas, señaló Rengam, como la acumulación de características genéticas, que permite al cultivador patentar dos o tres características modificadas genéticamente en la misma planta. Por ejemplo, el maíz modificado genéticamente de Monsanto incluye dos genes insecticidas además de un gen de tolerancia al herbicida.

    Asimismo, se ha incrementado la concesión de licencias cruzadas debido a la creciente colaboración entre las grandes empresas, cuyo objetivo es reducir los costosos litigios sobre propiedad intelectual y, al mismo tiempo, consolidar su poder y expandir sus mercados en los países en desarrollo, agregó Rengam. Monsanto y BASF anunciaron una colaboración de $1.500 millones de dólares estadounidenses destinados a la investigación y el desarrollo. “Eso trae aparejados precios más elevados para los agricultores, pero menos opciones disponibles y falta de innovación en el mercado”, concluyó la funcionaria.

    Por último, señaló que existe una masiva protección por patente de los denominados “genes climáticos”. Las empresas procuran obtener el monopolio de patentes de aquellas plantas que resisten condiciones climáticas adversas, tales como la sequía o la salinidad. A la fecha, empresas como Monsanto, BASF, DuPont, Syngenta y Bayer han presentado aproximadamente 500 solicitudes de patentes. Si bien las empresas biotecnológicas hacen pública su preocupación por el medio ambiente, el uso de pesticidas continúa en auge, lo que atenta contra la salud de los seres humanos, según manifestaron los participantes del taller.

    Fuerte oposición a la protección por patente de animales y semillas convencionales

    Los animales y las semillas convencionales también se ven afectados directamente por la protección por patente, expresó Christina Goethe de Swissaid. Se presentan cientos de solicitudes de patentes ante la Oficina Europea de Patentes, y actualmente la Alta Cámara de Recurso de la EPO estudia un importante caso. El denominado “caso del brécol” involucra una patente que hace referencia a los métodos de producción de nuevas plantas de la familia Brassica, específicamente el brécol. La patente ha sido solicitada por dos empresas, entre las cuales se encuentra la francesa Limagrain.

    Cinco organizaciones no gubernamentales (Berne Declaration, Greenpeace, Swissaid, Misereor y Kein Patent auf Leben) han realizado un llamamiento mundial y, además, planean presentar una carta conjunta ante la Alta Cámara de Recurso de la EPO en la que reafirman su oposición a las patentes de animales y semillas convencionales. Cuentan con el apoyo de cerca de 50 organizaciones agrícolas y esperan obtener mayor respaldo de las principales organizaciones agrícolas de todo el mundo.

    Según afirman, la decisión de la Alta Cámara de Recurso será vinculante para todas las demás solicitudes de patentes de animales y plantas cultivadas convencionalmente que se encuentran en trámite.

    Traducido del inglés por Fernanda Nieto Femenia

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.205.160.82