SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Latest Comments
  • So simply put, we have the NABP saying that all ph... »
  • The original Brustle decision was widely criticise... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    El caso Egyptian Goddess devuelve fuerza efectiva a derechos de diseños industriales de EE. UU.

    Published on 19 November 2008 @ 12:30 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Steven Seidenberg para Intellectual Property Watch
    En las últimas dos décadas, los derechos de diseños industriales fueron escasamente respetados en Estados Unidos. Pero eso terminó.

    Según diversos especialistas, la reciente resolución judicial en el caso Egyptian Goddess, Inc. contra Swisa, Inc. ha reforzado drásticamente los derechos de diseños industriales en Estados Unidos, lo que ha reajustado las protecciones nacionales de tales derechos a las normas internacionales.

    La resolución fue emitida a fines de septiembre por el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de EE. UU., a menudo llamado el “tribunal de patentes”. En una opinión unánime del tribunal en pleno, desestimó varias de sus propias decisiones que se remontan a hace más de dos décadas. Tales decisiones habían creado una prueba de infracción de dos partes, lo que para los demandantes era extremadamente difícil de satisfacer. Impedía de hecho que muchos titulares de derechos de diseños industriales pudieran hacer valer sus derechos en los tribunales.

    El caso Egyptian Goddess reemplaza la prueba de dos partes por una norma de una sola parte, lo que facilita en gran medida probar las infracciones de los derechos de diseños industriales, según afirman numerosos especialistas.

    “Le devuelve fuerza efectiva a la ley”, señaló Michael McCabe hijo, socio del estudio jurídico Oblon, Spivak, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt, de Alexandria, en Virginia.

    Los distintos países dan diferentes nombres a los derechos de diseños industriales. En Europa, se los llama “derechos de diseños industriales”; en Estados Unidos, “patentes de diseño”; y en gran parte de Asia, como en Japón, “derechos de diseños”.

    Independientemente del nombre que reciban, estos derechos de propiedad intelectual protegen los aspectos ornamentales de productos manufacturados. Para que puedan ser protegidos, los diseños deben ser nuevos y originales.

    En la mayor parte del mundo, estos derechos han ganado importancia en las últimas dos décadas. Las empresas se basan en ellos para proteger los aspectos ornamentales de una gama cada vez más amplia de productos: desde calzado deportivo hasta frascos de perfumes y productos electrónicos.

    “Los derechos de diseños industriales tienen mayor importancia y un uso más extendido fuera de Estados Unidos”, afirmó McCabe. “Estos derechos se consideran un valioso tipo de protección de la propiedad intelectual: otra herramienta para resguardar las innovaciones y para competir”.

    Sin embargo, en Estados Unidos estos derechos de propiedad intelectual han sufrido un desprestigio en los últimos 24 años. “Hace mucho tiempo que las patentes de diseños se consideran las más desprestigiadas ramas del mundo de las patentes, y con justa razón”, expresó Christopher Carani, socio del estudio jurídico McAndrews Held & Malloy, de Chicago.

    El problema comenzó en el año 1984, cuando el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones emitió su resolución en el caso Litton Systems, Inc. contra Whirlpool Corp. El tribunal sostuvo que la prueba tradicional de infracción de patentes de diseños era insuficiente para que un demandante pudiera demostrar una similitud substancial entre su diseño patentado y el diseño de la infracción. A la prueba de infracción le agregó una segunda parte. En consecuencia, a fin de probar una infracción, el demandante debía mostrar qué aspecto específico de su diseño era diferente de diseños anteriores y demostrar que el diseño del demandado violaba este aspecto novedoso.

    Esta prueba del “aspecto novedoso” tenía como objetivo proteger a los demandados, cuyas obras eran sustancialmente similares a las de los demandantes simplemente porque los diseños de ambas partes contenían elementos de diseños previos no patentados. De ese modo, la prueba imponía límites razonables a los titulares de patentes de diseños, pues les impedía que de hecho hicieran valer derechos de patente por elementos de diseño no patentables.

    Lamentablemente, el aspecto novedoso tuvo consecuencias mucho mayores: hizo que muchas patentes de diseños no fueran exigibles.

    Por ejemplo, supongamos que el diseño de un demandante fuera particularmente original y tuviera muchos aspectos novedosos. Un demandado podía eludir su responsabilidad en la medida en que su diseño no copiara todos los aspectos novedosos, incluso si copiara la mayoría de tales aspectos y su diseño general fuera casi idéntico al diseño patentado, afirmó el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones en el caso Egyptian Goddess.

    Los presuntos infractores podían adoptar otro enfoque. “Los demandados podían echar por tierra un diseño con solo demostrar que diferentes aspectos del diseño se encontraban en distintas partes del estado de la técnica”, explicó Patricia Rogowski, socia del estudio jurídico Connolly Bove Lodge & Hutz, de Wilmington, en Delaware. El diseño de los demandantes quedaba sin aspectos novedosos y, en consecuencia, no podía ser exigible.

    “Se podía tener un diseño que fuera una copia exacta de una patente de diseño, pero no se lo consideraba una infracción”, señaló McCabe. “Era absurdo… La prueba del aspecto novedoso se convirtió en un verdadero obstáculo para el valor de las patentes de diseño”.

    Egyptian Goddess, Inc. y Swisa, Inc. son empresas privadas de productos de belleza. Ambas producen pulidores de uñas, entre otros artículos. Egyptian Goddess obtuvo una patente de diseño para su pulidor y alegó que su diseño era infringido por el de Swisa. El tribunal del juicio determinó que ambos diseños eran lo suficientemente diferentes, por lo que no existía infracción. Egyptian Goddess apeló. El Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones aplicó una norma jurídica diferente, más favorable a los titulares de patentes, pero la sentencia judicial igualmente consideró que el pulidor de Swisa no cometía infracción.

    En el caso Egyptian Goddess, el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones reconoció los problemas generados por la aplicación de la prueba del aspecto novedoso y la obvió como un elemento separado para establecer la infracción. El tribunal en gran medida volvió a la prueba de la infracción establecida por el Tribunal Supremo de Estados Unidos en el caso Gorham Co. contra White de 1871: existe infracción si “para el observador común, según la atención que un comprador normalmente presta, ambos diseños [el del demandante y el del demandado] son sustancialmente el mismo…”.

    No obstante, el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones no abandonó completamente la prueba del aspecto novedoso, según lo expresan los especialistas. “El tribunal combina con la prueba del observador común el requisito de que el observador tenga conocimientos del estado de la técnica”, indicó Rogowski. “No basta decir que los diseños [el del demandante y el del demandado] son parecidos. El observador común debe conocer el estado de la técnica del sector”.

    Sin embargo, al eliminar la prueba del aspecto novedoso, el caso Egyptian Goddess constituye un importante impulso para hacer valer las patentes de diseño. “Gracias a la resolución, resulta más fácil para los titulares de las patentes de diseños probar las infracciones”, dijo Rogowski.

    Ello, a su vez, alienta a que las empresas soliciten patentes de diseños estadounidenses, según los especialistas.

    “Con el tiempo, el caso Egyptian Goddess tendrá el efecto de incrementar la importancia y el uso de estos derechos de propiedad intelectual en Estados Unidos”, opinó McCabe. “Las patentes de diseños volverán a ser consideradas una importante herramienta para las empresas”.

    Según Carani, “Muchas más empresas utilizarán patentes para proteger sus diseños en Estados Unidos”.

    Traducido del inglés por Fernanda Nieto Femenia

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.227.67.175