SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Latest Comments
  • So simply put, we have the NABP saying that all ph... »
  • The original Brustle decision was widely criticise... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Ambas partes se proclaman victoriosas en el litigio del intercambio de archivos en la industria discográfica estadounidense

    Published on 6 October 2008 @ 2:50 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Bruce Gain para Intellectual Property Watch
    Después de cinco años y de más de 30.000 demandas judiciales, ambas partes de la batalla legal de la industria discográfica contra el intercambio ilegal de archivos en EE. UU. se adjudican la victoria.

    De un lado, la Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), que representa a EMI, Sony BMG, Warner Brothers y filiales, afirma que los pleitos actuales actúan como factor disuasivo para los posibles infractores. Según dicha asociación, los litigios forman parte de una campaña de concienciación general, cuyo objetivo es transmitir el mensaje de que la descarga y el intercambio de archivos protegidos por el derecho de autor son ilegales.

    Del otro lado, los que se oponen a los litigios sostienen que las demandas judiciales son un castigo excesivo para aquéllos a quienes apuntan los abogados de la RIAA y que no constituyen, en realidad, un elemento disuasivo que evite el intercambio de archivos en EE. UU.

    No obstante, que los litigios hayan logrado prevenir o no el intercambio ilegal de archivos depende de la interpretación de los datos estadísticos.

    Citando las estadísticas del NPD Group, la RIAA señala que la cantidad de hogares que usan redes de persona a persona para descargar música “apenas” ascendió a 7,8 millones en marzo de 2007, en comparación con los 6,9 millones de abril de 2003, antes de que comenzaran los litigios, mientras que en el mismo período, la penetración de la banda ancha creció más del doble.

    Aunque la RIAA reconoce que los litigios tienen aún que recorrer un largo camino hasta que se elimine el intercambio ilegal de archivos protegidos por el derecho de autor, hace hincapié en que la campaña judicial ha servido como una eficaz campaña de relaciones públicas. Los pleitos han fomentado la concienciación acerca de la ilegalidad de descargar y distribuir archivos protegidos por el derecho de autor, agrega la RIAA.

    De acuerdo con una encuesta de la RIAA, el 37% de los encuestados en 2003 opinaban que era ilegal poner música a disposición del público de forma gratuita en Internet. La misma institución asegura que ahora el porcentaje de personas que consideran ilegal la descarga gratuita de música es del 73%.

    Jonathan Lamy, portavoz de la RIAA, en una declaración brindada a Intellectual Property Watch, afirmaba lo siguiente: “Indudablemente, este programa ha ayudado a moldear el mercado digital legal de la actualidad. Hay una concienciación generalizada de que sitios como LimeWire que ofrecen música en forma gratuita son ilegales”. Agregó: “Este programa ha ayudado a estimular innovadores negocios virtuales que, de otro modo, nunca habrían tenido la posibilidad de surgir, y mucho menos de prosperar”.

    La RIAA se negó a hacer declaraciones específicamente para este artículo.

    Sin embargo, las estadísticas que presentó la RIAA “no prueban nada”, afirmó Fred von Lohmann, abogado de la Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), un grupo que protege los derechos del consumidor de artículos digitales con sede en California.

    “La cuestión no reside en las razones que dan quienes han desistido de su accionar, sino en cuántas personas no han desistido, a pesar de enterarse de las demandas judiciales”, explicó von Lohmann. “Por supuesto, aquéllos que desisten dicen que temen a los pleitos —después de todo, ellos son quienes dejan de usar redes de persona a persona—, aunque algunas encuestas demuestran que hay más usuarios preocupados por el spyware (programas espías) que por las demandas.

    Tampoco se aclara qué hacen los individuos después de que desisten de intercambiar archivos en redes de persona a persona”.

    Fundamentalmente, “no hay suficientes pruebas que respalden la afirmación de la RIAA de que las demandas judiciales representan un ‘factor disuasivo eficaz’”, afirmó von Lohmann. “Estoy seguro de que las demandas judiciales han disuadido a algunas personas —quizás esto ha provocado que infrinjan de maneras menos públicas, por ejemplo, intercambiando archivos entre amigos—, pero es indiscutible que el intercambio vía redes de persona a persona ha seguido creciendo durante los cinco años de la campaña judicial”.

    En el momento de la publicación de este artículo, la EFF publicaba un informe titulado “La RIAA contra el pueblo: cinco años después”.

    De todos modos, la mayoría de los usuarios consiguen música gratuitamente en Internet, según John Palfrey, profesor adjunto de derecho de la Harvard Law School y codirector ejecutivo del Berkman Center for Internet and Society. La tendencia a descargar e intercambiar archivos de música y otros medios en forma gratuita, aclaró Palfrey, prevalece especialmente entre los usuarios más jóvenes que Palfrey describe en el reciente libro de su coautoría Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives (Nacidos digitales: cómo comprender la primera generación de los nacidos en la era digital). Estos usuarios más jóvenes que nacieron después del comienzo de la denominada “era digital” tendrán un profundo efecto en el modo en que todos los medios digitales se distribuirán en el futuro, cuando sean mayores de edad, explicó.

    “[La RIAA dice que] ‘los castigos continuarán hasta que la moral se fortalezca’ en relación con las demandas judiciales y esta población de jóvenes”, indicó Palfrey. “Pero si se sigue castigando a estos jóvenes, la moral no mejorará”.

    La controversia

    Desde que la RIAA inició su campaña de litigios en septiembre de 2003, su uso del sistema judicial estadounidense para reclamar daños y perjuicios mediante la aplicación de la Ley sobre Derecho de Autor de EE. UU. ha suscitado considerable controversia, especialmente cuando en algunos casos se apuntó a quienes no correspondía.

    En un caso muy publicitado, una mujer soltera llamada Tanya Andersen salió victoriosa de una larga batalla judicial. El bufete jurídico que representa a la RIAA reclamaba 1 millón de dólares por daños y perjuicios, o 750 dólares por cada una de las 1.400 canciones que supuestamente Andersen intercambió, mientras que Andersen sostenía que ella nunca había siquiera escuchado los títulos de las canciones y mucho menos las había descargado.

    En otros casos, la RIAA se equivocó al demandar a personas que estaban muertas, que estaban incapacitadas en el momento en que se llevaron a cabo las actividades que se les atribuían o que no tenían acceso a Internet cuando una cuenta de un servidor de Internet se asociaba al intercambio de archivos.

    En la mayoría de los casos, los demandados en EE. UU. generalmente llegan a un acuerdo extrajudicial, sean inocentes o no, por un monto habitualmente superior a los 5.000 dólares, pues este costo es inferior a lo que significaría contratar los servicios de un abogado, explicó Ray Beckerman, abogado especialista en temas de Internet que ha representado con éxito a individuos que la RIAA demandó por intercambio ilegal de archivos en EE. UU.

    Un caso que tuvo mucha publicidad, Capitol contra Thomas, previamente considerado una victoria legal de la RIAA, será llevado nuevamente a juicio después de que el juez desestimó el veredicto del jurado que determinaba 222.000 dólares por daños y perjuicios pagaderos por una madre de Minnesota que intercambió 24 temas musicales.

    Después de desestimar el veredicto, el juez de distrito Michael J. Davis solicitó la intervención del Congreso para que enmendara la Ley sobre Derecho de Autor, la cual, según él, no se aplica al intercambio de archivos realizado por usuarios.

    “Lamentablemente, cuando usó Kazaa, Thomas [la demandada] procedió como muchos otros usuarios de Internet. Sus supuestos actos fueron ilegales, pero comunes”, escribió el juez. “Su condición de consumidora que no procuraba dañar a sus competidores ni perseguía fines de lucro no es una excusa para su comportamiento. Pero la indemnización de cientos de miles de dólares por daños y perjuicios es opresiva y carece de antecedentes”.

    El veredicto fue desestimado por lo que, según Beckerman, fueron erróneas instrucciones dadas al jurado.

    “Es decir, el juez impartió instrucciones erróneas, el jurado presentó un veredicto impropio y, unos ocho meses después, el juez se percató de que había cometido un evidente error de derecho cuando dio las instrucciones incorrectas al jurado, y en su decisión mencionó que ninguno de los abogados le había informado sobre ello”, señaló Beckerman.

    El año pasado, la RIAA comenzó a centrarse en las universidades estadounidenses como parte de una “iniciativa de educación y disuasión”. La RIAA les envió cartas en las que solicitaba que proporcionaran las direcciones IP de los supuestos infractores. De manera similar a la campaña de litigios que se dirigió hacia individuos en EE. UU., en las cartas se advertía que la RIAA podría demandar por daños y perjuicios de hasta 750 dólares por canción y luego se solicitaba un acuerdo extrajudicial de unos 3.000 dólares para evitar el pleito.

    Sin embargo, Beckerman considera que la RIAA tiene problemas para ganar los casos contra estudiantes universitarios que llegan a la instancia de juicio.

    “La ola se revirtió en aquellos casos [contra las universidades y sus usuarios] porque supongo que los tribunales estadounidenses no estaban preparados para esta arremetida”, estimó Beckerman. “Se encontraron con inmensos paquetes de documentos de grandes bufetes jurídicos, y abundante y sobrecogedora jerga tecnológica. No entendían cuán ilegítimos eran estos litigios”.

    ¿No es la solución final?

    La RIAA y los miembros de la asociación de la industria discográfica que ella representa están de acuerdo en que las demandas judiciales son apenas una pequeña parte del futuro de la distribución musical, habida cuenta del modo en que Internet y la digitalización de la música han creado un nuevo canal de medios que está reestructurando la industria. Incluso actualmente, los formatos de música digital, como las descargas y las ventas de tonos de llamada, representan 2,4 mil millones de dólares en EE. UU. y el 23% de los ingresos de la industria discográfica, según los datos de fines de 2007 de la RIAA.

    Ahora que la industria de la música digital se ha convertido en un sector multimillonario a escasos años de su creación, existen numerosos servicios de suscripciones, descargas y transmisión continua interactiva, según Patrick Ross, director ejecutivo de Copyright Alliance.

    “En la era digital, las industrias creativas deben ser flexibles para satisfacer los deseos del consumidor y, a su vez, garantizar que se compense a los creadores”, indicó Ross. “En este ámbito hemos presenciado mucha experimentación en el mercado (servicios autorizados a operar sin ninguna idea real de cuál sería el rendimiento, si lo hubiera) junto con una campaña de educación sobre las infracciones a la que siguieron pleitos ocasionales”.

    No obstante, las infracciones continúan siendo un gran problema, evaluó Ross, especialmente en los campus universitarios.

    “Incluso con una gran cantidad de servicios legales asequibles a disposición del público, no todo el mundo está dispuesto a usarlos para operar legalmente”, expresó Ross. “La industria deberá permanecer alerta, pero ya se ha asegurado por medio de la ley de que los sellos discográficos no pierdan estos derechos”.

    Traducido por Fernanda Nieto Femenia

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.211.47.170