SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »
  • 'Business methods were generally not patentable in... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    El siempre creciente “movimiento” de acceso a los conocimientos busca fortalecerse mediante la diversidad

    Published on 8 September 2008 @ 8:16 am

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Kaitlin Mara
    La inclusión de un texto sobre el “acceso a los conocimientos” en un acuerdo sobre derechos de propiedad intelectual y desarrollo a finales del año pasado fue percibida por los partidarios de esta iniciativa como un gran éxito. Algunas propuestas, que hace unos años habrían sido consideradas como demasiado radicales, quedaron entonces codificadas en una iniciativa multilateral de desarrollo.

    El Programa de la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual para el Desarrollo, acordado en octubre de 2007, incluye entre sus 45 disposiciones la obligación de ayudar a los países en desarrollo a obtener acceso a la información, y que los regímenes internacionales de propiedad intelectual no sólo incentiven la creación de conocimientos, sino también la difusión de los mismos.

    Pero a medida que el vagamente definido movimiento de acceso a los conocimientos (A2K, por el inglés Access to Knowledge), que se apoya en gran medida en miembros de la comunidad académica y bibliotecarios, organizaciones no gubernamentales y defensores de los consumidores, intenta llevar adelante el logro de sus objetivos, las opiniones difieren en cuanto a lo que significa el acceso y la forma de alcanzarlo. El movimiento cuenta con participantes clave, visión y apoyo del público, pero carece de un eje central claro o de un consenso sobre la forma de afianzar su posición en la sociedad mundial.

    Algunos de estos elementos podrían llegar a definirse durante la tercera conferencia anual del A2K, que se celebrará en Ginebra entre el 8 y el 10 de septiembre. La Conferencia del A2K, organizada por la Facultad de Derecho de Yale y otros asociados, se celebró por primera vez en 2006.

    La gran victoria hasta la fecha para los partidarios del A2K parece estar en el discurso. Susan Sell, Profesora de la Universidad George Washington, dijo que los defensores del A2K plantearon nuevamente el tema de la propiedad intelectual como una cuestión ética de la misma manera que los primeros proponentes del Acuerdo sobre los Aspectos de los Derechos de Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio (Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC) de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) habían replanteado originalmente el asunto de la PI respecto al comercio internacional.

    “Las palabras importan”, escribió Sell, “si aumentan los costos políticos de apoyar el status quo”.

    El razonamiento de base de un sistema de propiedad intelectual siempre comprendía dos objetivos: incentivar la innovación, que supone proteger los derechos de los innovadores, e incentivar el intercambio de las innovaciones. Existe, por lo tanto, un componente de propiedad y un componente de acceso.

    Algunos participantes en el A2K han reiterado que el movimiento no se opone a la propiedad intelectual como tal, pero intenta tan sólo restablecer el equilibrio de un sistema desproporcionado tras tantos años de fortalecimiento de la observancia de la PI. El Profesor Jerome Reichman, de la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Duke, sostiene que el A2K es un contrapeso necesario al “trinquete unidireccional” que emplean las empresas multinacionales a favor de mayores y más estrictos derechos de propiedad intelectual.

    Otros, como Mike Godwin, abogado principal de la Fundación Wikimedia, han expresado la opinión de que el movimiento A2K no es “reactivo” ni se centra tanto en las “limitaciones y excepciones a las actuales normas de propiedad intelectual”, como en lograr que la idea sea reconocida en forma independiente en el ámbito internacional.

    “En los últimos años, el acceso a los conocimientos se ha convertido en un poderoso término del discurso global sobre la gobernanza del conocimiento, la innovación y la gestión de la propiedad intelectual”, afirmó Sisule Musungu, fundador de IQSensato, una organización internacional dedicada a la investigación sobre políticas, y uno de los pensadores originales del movimiento de acceso a los conocimientos.

    El éxito requiere un líder

    En los primeros años el movimiento A2K “tuvo más éxito de lo que cualquiera hubiera podido llegar a imaginar”, dijo Reichman a Intellectual Property Watch. “Podríamos obtener un instrumento no vinculante sobre la base de nuestro éxito”, dijo, pero añadió que la falta de liderazgo claro dentro del movimiento A2K podría convertirse en un problema.

    Katz señaló que el movimiento A2K “no tenía un verdadero centro”, aunque las diversas conferencias organizadas por la Facultad de Derecho de Yale “hallaban la manera de generar gran cantidad de comentarios”, como lo hacían la página web de la organización Knowledge Ecology International (KEI), el portal IPRsonline, un sitio informativo del Centro Internacional de Comercio y Desarrollo Sostenible (ICTSD), y el proyecto de la Biblioteca de Alejandría (Egipto) sobre el acceso a los conocimientos.

    Parte de la cuestión, señaló Musungu, es que el “movimiento” A2K trata de ser un grupo formado por un gran número de individuos informales u organizaciones que en términos generales comparten los mismos ideales, pero cuyas metas y objetivos específicos no necesariamente están en perfecta consonancia.

    Amy Kapczynski, de la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Berkeley, señaló en un reciente artículo publicado en el Yale Law Journal que fue tan sólo en los últimos años que grupos dispares comenzaron a reunirse bajo la rúbrica de A2K, en gran medida impulsados por los intentos de ejercer presión para que la OMPI adoptara el programa para el Desarrollo, “al exigir que el organismo fuera más receptivo a las necesidades de los países en desarrollo y más abierta a establecer mecanismos de innovación que no dependieran de los derechos exclusivos”.

    Es en el Programa de la OMPI para el Desarrollo, según dijo Katz a Intellectual Property Watch, en lo que “se centran actualmente todos los interesados en el A2K”; allí, y en las excepciones y limitaciones al derecho de autor.

    Sin embargo, a Reichman le preocupa que la falta de un organismo central pueda llevar al movimiento A2K a perder sentido. “Yo espero”, dijo, que el movimiento “no esté en proceso de desintegración”.

    La KEI debería desempeñar un papel primordial en la organización del A2K, afirmó Reichman, y añadió que este grupo fue fundamental en “el nacimiento” del movimiento A2K.

    Musungu reiteró que la amplia gama de puntos de vista y objetivos diferentes que existen entre los grupos reunidos bajo la rúbrica A2K es, en sí, “la prueba de que existe un movimiento”.

    Hay un “deseo compartido de que haya un cambio social en la forma como se rigen los conocimientos”, señaló, pero “la coherencia, si [se entiende] como el pleno acuerdo respecto a cada objetivo, no es un requisito para la existencia de un movimiento”.

    Intellectual Property Watch ha venido informando acerca de las políticas relacionadas con el acceso a los conocimientos desde el año 2004 (véase, por ejemplo, IPW Monthly Reporter, abril de 2008; diciembre de 2007; marzo de 2007; mayo de 2006; agosto de 2005; marzo de 2005).

    Alcance, aplicación y metas

    Si bien la utilización del término ‘acceso a los conocimientos’ se ha vuelto más ambiguo, la determinación de cambiar la gobernanza del conocimiento se ha extendido a un número cada vez mayor de disciplinas.

    Por ejemplo, Peter Suber, un profesor de investigación en el Earlham College, conocido por encabezar un movimiento similar sobre el acceso abierto, ha observado “una creciente tendencia de las universidades a exigirle (no sólo a alentarlo) al cuerpo docente” que publique sus artículos en revistas abiertas, conscientes de que hacer pública su investigación favorece sus propios intereses.

    La Science Commons, una organización creada con el objetivo de facilitar la colaboración entre investigadores de la comunidad científica, parte de la idea de que en la investigación el acceso a los conocimientos es un problema relacionado tanto con la facilidad para establecer contactos y con la transferencia de información y de materiales, como con la propiedad intelectual.

    Los partidarios del acceso a los conocimientos también han formado sus propias estructuras y comunidades de innovación, lo que demuestra que la propiedad intelectual puede utilizarse de manera creativa para estimular la invención. Estas iniciativas incluyen el conjunto de licencias Creative Commons y GNU, que facilitan el intercambio y modificación de obras protegidas por el derecho de autor, la innovación entre pares, los portales y enciclopedias establecidas socialmente, el software de fuente abierta y el desarrollo de la biotecnología, y el uso de compromisos de mercado anticipados o premios, en lugar de patentes, para recompensar a los innovadores.

    Sin embargo, Katz también señaló los esfuerzos de promoción del A2K en ámbitos como el de los productos agrícolas y la asistencia sanitaria; los conocimientos tradicionales y los recursos genéticos; las publicaciones de acceso abierto y la exención del pago de los derechos de autor para educadores, bibliotecas y científicos; los archivos digitales; los medios de comunicación culturales, como las bitácoras; el movimiento a favor del software libre y de fuente abierta; las normas abiertas para productos tecnológicos, y las campañas para incrementar la disponibilidad de Internet.

    La búsqueda de definiciones acerca de qué es el A2K, a qué se dedica, y cuáles deberían ser sus metas u objetivos finales continuará, pero queda por ver hacia dónde llevarán estas preguntas al movimiento multifacético.

    Traducido por Giselle Martínez

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 37.59.71.177