SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »
  • 'Business methods were generally not patentable in... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Difícil aplicación de metas de biodiversidad y seguridad alimentaria en tratado internacional sobre semillas

    Published on 15 August 2008 @ 8:49 pm

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Catherine Saez
    Mientras el mundo lucha contra una crisis global de alimentos, la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO) está trabajando para apoyar la biodiversidad, como una forma de contribuir a la seguridad alimentaria.

    Con ese fin, la FAO ha lanzado una iniciativa para garantizar que esta diversidad genética mundial sea accesible, con la esperanza de que ello promueva una agricultura sostenible y una mayor seguridad alimentaria.

    El Tratado Internacional sobre los Recursos Fitogenéticos para la Alimentación y la Agricultura, que aborda la necesidad de la diversidad promoviendo la conservación y el uso sostenible de recursos fitogenéticos para la alimentación y la agricultura y una distribución equitativa de los beneficios que se derivan de su utilización, fue adoptado por la Conferencia de la FAO en noviembre de 2001 y entró en vigor en junio de 2004. A mediados de julio del presente año, 118 países, o partes contratantes, habían firmado el acuerdo, según el sitio web.

    El Tratado procura recolectar y distribuir recursos fitogenéticos mundiales a fin de patrocinar la diversidad genética y garantizar la seguridad alimentaria. Sus principales componentes son: los derechos del agricultor, el sistema multilateral de acceso y distribución de beneficios, y una estrategia de financiación.

    Derechos del agricultor y distribución de beneficios

    El Tratado reconoce la contribución que los agricultores han aportado a la diversidad de los cultivos. En el artículo 9, describe un sistema mundial para dar a los agricultores, fitomejoradores y científicos acceso a material fitogenético, y asegura que los receptores compartan los beneficios derivados del uso de tales materiales genéticos.

    También asegura que diversos recursos genéticos no sólo se conserven, sino que además se utilicen para “mejorar el rendimiento y la calidad… para afrontar las enfermedades de las plantas y los cambios climáticos, y para satisfacer las necesidades de las personas, en constante evolución”.

    El Tratado alienta a los gobiernos de las partes contratantes a “según proceda… adoptar las medidas pertinentes para proteger y promover los Derechos del agricultor”, incluido el derecho a participar en la adopción de decisiones sobre recursos fitogenéticos en el ámbito nacional, el derecho a proteger los conocimientos tradicionales y el derecho a participar equitativamente en la distribución de los beneficios. Asimismo, reconoce que los agricultores pueden tener el derecho a conservar, utilizar, intercambiar y vender material de siembra conservado en las fincas, aunque esto depende de las disposiciones de las legislaciones nacionales, según Shakeel Bhatti, Secretario Ejecutivo del Tratado.

    Sistema multilateral y transferencia de recursos genéticos

    Según el Tratado, las partes contratantes acuerdan poner a disposición de todos su información sobre diversidad genética y aspectos relacionados que conciernan a los cultivos almacenados en sus bancos genéticos. La herramienta para ello es un sistema multilateral de acceso y distribución de beneficios, el cual se llevó a la práctica en 2007. Durante los primeros ocho meses de su existencia, se lo utilizó para realizar 89.000 transferencias de material, informó Bhatti.

    El sistema genera una base de datos en Internet con capacidad de búsqueda de recursos genéticos contenidos en los bancos genéticos de los países signatarios. Se aplica a 64 cultivos y forrajes principales (cultivos alimentarios para ganado de pastoreo, como el vacuno), tales como arroz, trigo, lentejas, manzanas, sorgo y ñame.

    Los materiales incluidos en el sistema multilateral se encuentran bajo la gestión y el control de las partes contratantes y, en su mayoría, son del dominio público. No obstante, podrían existir algunos derechos de propiedad intelectual sobre el material que fue incluido voluntariamente en el sistema por sus titulares ante la invitación de las partes contratantes.

    Según el Tratado, los receptores de materiales genéticos no reclamarán ningún derecho de propiedad intelectual sobre los recursos fitogenéticos o sus partes genéticas, en la forma recibida del sistema multilateral. El Tratado también hace concesiones respecto del acceso a material genético aún protegido por leyes de propiedad intelectual, pues establece que las normas internacionales de propiedad intelectual deben seguirse, pero que los países en desarrollo y menos adelantados deben contar con términos favorables para acceder a tecnologías sostenibles.

    En caso de que un receptor genere otra planta con materiales genéticos obtenidos a través del sistema multilateral, las partes contratantes acuerdan que los beneficios derivados de su uso deben distribuirse de manera justa y equitativa, especialmente los que se deriven de la comercialización.

    “Los fondos se destinarán exclusivamente para el beneficio de agricultores de países en desarrollo”, explicó Bhatti. La distribución de beneficios también se realiza a través del acceso facilitado a material genético para todos los usuarios, la transferencia de tecnología para la conservación, la caracterización, la evaluación y el uso de recursos genéticos, y la creación de capacidades mediante la educación técnica y científica, y la capacitación en conservación y en utilización sostenible.

    Las transferencias de materiales genéticos se llevan a cabo mediante acuerdos normalizados de transferencia de material entre proveedores y receptores. El acceso a materiales genéticos está permitido solamente para la utilización y conservación destinadas a la investigación, el mejoramiento y la capacitación para alimentación y agricultura. No se admiten las aplicaciones químicas ni farmacéuticas.

    Fitomejoradores reacios a utilizar el sistema multilateral

    Las condiciones en las cuales los materiales se obtienen a través del sistema multilateral no parecen cumplir con las expectativas de los fitomejoradores, según la Federación Internacional de Semillas (ISF, por su sigla en inglés). Con miembros en más de 70 países desarrollados y en desarrollo, la ISF sostiene que representa una gran mayoría del comercio mundial de semillas y de la comunidad de fitomejoradores.

    Aunque en un documento de posición de 2007 la ISF manifestó su “firme respaldo al sistema multilateral y al principio de la transferencia normalizada de material”, Bernard Le Buanec, asesor superior y secretario general de la organización hasta diciembre de 2007, expresó su preocupación por la ausencia de un umbral para el nivel de incorporación del material al que se accede en el producto final.

    “Cuando integramos material genético en un programa de investigación, nos gustaría pagar regalías solamente a partir de un cierto porcentaje del material utilizado. Por debajo de dicho porcentaje, deberíamos estar exentos de las regalías”, afirmó Le Buanec.

    Otro problema importante, según Le Buanec, es que no hay un plazo para los acuerdos normalizados de transferencia de material. “Muy pocas empresas están dispuestas a comprometerse durante un lapso infinito”, explicó y agregó que en dichos acuerdos debería existir una cláusula que permita la rescisión del contrato. “El órgano rector deberá revisar este asunto en los próximos años”, indicó, pues es improbable que las empresas privadas utilicen el sistema en su estado actual. Según su entender, la mayoría de dichos acuerdos han sido firmados por universidades o empresas públicas.

    Los fitomejoradores pueden distribuir los beneficios derivados de la utilización del sistema multilateral de dos maneras. Si deciden no patentar una nueva variedad de semilla que hayan creado, ésta es accesible a todos, señaló Le Buanec, y representa un beneficio en especie. “Para nosotros, esto es una distribución de beneficios”, manifestó Pierre Roger, abogado principal en materia de propiedad intelectual para Groupe Limagrain. Si patentan su creación, habrá una distribución de los beneficios comerciales.

    ONG cuestionan la eficacia del Tratado para los derechos de agricultores

    Según Philippe Cullet, del Centro de Investigación sobre el Derecho Ambiental Internacional, el Tratado no logra el objetivo de fortalecer los derechos de los agricultores. El derecho a conservar, utilizar e intercambiar estipulado en el Tratado “básicamente repite cosas tan obvias que debería hacer sonrojar a los elaboradores de políticas”, indicó. “Eso, en cierto sentido, quiere decir que los agricultores tienen derecho a los cultivos que sembraron en sus propias tierras”.

    Según Cullet, el problema reside en que el Tratado no pone obstáculos para la celebración de acuerdos sobre “uso de tecnología” que impedirían, como una condición de venta, que los agricultores vuelvan a plantar semillas de segunda generación de una compra.

    GRAIN, una ONG que promueve la gestión y el uso sostenibles de la biodiversidad agrícola, informó en noviembre de 2007 que unas 30 organizaciones de agricultores y de la sociedad civil solicitaron formalmente, en una reunión de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Tratado, que se interrumpiera el intercambio de materiales genéticos porque consideraban que los gobiernos no estaban cumpliendo con sus obligaciones. Algunos agricultores expusieron que el Tratado favorecía a las empresas multinacionales de semillas al darles acceso a semillas de agricultores sin beneficios recíprocos, según GRAIN.

    Muchas tensiones pendientes rodean al Tratado, según Hope Shand, del grupo no gubernamental ETC Group, el cual participó en las negociaciones de siete años que condujeron a dicho instrumento.

    “ETC Group considera que la interpretación que el Tratado hace de los derechos de los agricultores debe reforzarse en el contexto de la soberanía alimentaria. Los gobiernos deben comprometerse con dinero y energía en una estrategia a largo plazo para la conservación y el mejoramiento de las fincas”, agregó.

    El derecho a conservar, utilizar e intercambiar semillas es un asunto complejo. En una declaración de organizaciones de la sociedad civil presentes en la segunda reunión del órgano rector del Tratado celebrada en noviembre de 2007, los agricultores vincularon sus derechos a reutilizar, conservar, proteger, intercambiar y vender sus semillas con sus derechos a acceder libremente a los recursos genéticos, para poder contribuir a la conservación y a la renovación de la biodiversidad, informó GRAIN. Sin embargo, en varios países signatarios del Tratado está prohibido guardar, conservar y vender semillas. Las organizaciones de la sociedad civil señalaron que era responsabilidad del Tratado brindar asistencia a los Estados para que apliquen las leyes que ratifican estos derechos.

    Luego de observar en 2007 que “existe incertidumbre en muchos países respecto de cómo pueden aplicarse los derechos de los agricultores”, el órgano rector adoptó una resolución sobre los derechos de los agricultores y comenzó a recopilar información, manifestó Bhatti. Se ha solicitado que se brinde información sobre cómo se aplican los derechos de los agricultores en distintos países y sobre cómo tales países planean proceder, afirmó.

    Estrategia de financiación: la iniciativa noruega

    La financiación del Tratado parece ser una operación difícil, pues no se espera que se obtengan beneficios monetarios procedentes de la comercialización de nuevas variedades durante varios años, debido a los prolongados procesos de investigación y a la evidente falta de financiación gubernamental.

    En marzo de 2008, Noruega anunció que pretende realizar una contribución anual al fondo de distribución de beneficios del Tratado. La contribución será del 0,1% del valor de todas las semillas que se vendan a través de la industria agropecuaria noruega y que sean compradas por agricultores noruegos. Noruega alienta a otros países a realizar contribuciones similares.

    Steve Suppan, del Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, dijo que, a juzgar por los informes gestionados por listserv, la aplicación del Tratado ha sido difícil debido, en parte, a la falta de financiación proveniente de las partes contratantes.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 23.20.211.153