SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Siguen en aumento las solicitudes de patente en el mundo, pero podrían estabilizarse. Las naciones pequeñas decaen

    Published on 12 August 2008 @ 8:59 am

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por William New
    A escala mundial, en particular en algunas naciones, la presentación de solicitudes de patente sigue creciendo, a medida que aumentan los problemas de procesamiento de solicitudes de gran volumen y de aseguramiento de calidad. Sin embargo, debe prestarse más atención a la introducción de las economías pequeñas en los sistemas de patentes, y el proceso correspondiente podría desacelerarse en épocas de dificultades económicas, manifestaron la semana pasada funcionarios de la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual (OMPI).

    En el Informe Anual de la OMPI sobre Patentes publicado recientemente, se demostró que las solicitudes de patente en el ámbito mundial crecieron casi el 5% en 2006 con respecto al año anterior, y las patentes concedidas treparon más del 18%, a 727.000 patentes concedidas en 2006 (las últimas cifras disponibles). Estas cifras representan nuevos derechos de propiedad y pueden haber aumentado ostensiblemente debido a mejoras en la eficiencia del procesamiento, explicó en una reunión de información para la prensa el 31 de julio Francis Gurry, Director General Adjunto de la OMPI.

    Existe un problema relacionado con una gran concentración en pocos países, ya que cinco naciones representan el 76% de todas las solicitudes de patente: Japón, Estados Unidos, Corea, Alemania y China. Dicha concentración se acrecienta, lo cual sugiere que las economías pequeñas posiblemente aún no encuentran formas de participar. Esto será una prioridad para la OMPI, indicó Gurry.

    Por otro lado, la Oficina de Patentes y Marcas de Estados Unidos se transformó en la “oficina de patentes más grande” del mundo, con la mayor cantidad de solicitudes, por primera vez desde 1963, dado que Estados Unidos volvió a alcanzar a Japón después de varias décadas.

    En 2006, Estados Unidos recibió 425.966 solicitudes de patente, seguido por Japón con 408.674 (una leve disminución). La oficina de patentes de China recibió 210.501 solicitudes; Corea, 166.189; y la Oficina Europea de Patentes (OEP), 135.231. Los países europeos muestran una tendencia creciente de presentar solicitudes a través de la OEP en lugar de usar sus oficinas nacionales.

    Los mayores aumentos de porcentaje en la cantidad total de solicitudes de patente presentadas en todo el mundo se encuentran en China, con 32,1%; Corea, con 6,6%; y Estados Unidos, con 6,7%.

    En 2007, las solicitudes de patente presentadas a través del Tratado de Cooperación en materia de Patentes (PCT) se calculan en 158.400, con un aumento casi del 6% respecto de 2006.

    Las economías débiles podrían afectar la concesión de patentes

    Un gráfico del informe de tendencias en el total de patentes otorgadas mostró que la cantidad de concesiones se reduce cuando la economía cae, como en 1991 y 2002, lo cual quizá vuelva a ocurrir en 2008 ó 2009.

    Sin embargo, no queda claro si persistirá la prolongada tendencia ascendente de patentes a la luz de la economía mundial tambaleante. “Aún no lo sabemos”, afirmó Gurry, quien observó que una patente se retira al final de la investigación.

    Considerando las disminuciones de 1991 y 2002, William Meredith de la OMPI dijo: “Es de esperar que lo mismo ocurra con la crisis actual, es decir, que las solicitudes de patente disminuyan”.

    Otro dato estadístico reveló que las patentes rara vez permanecen vigentes durante los 20 años de monopolio que se les concede. Funcionarios de la OMPI sugirieron que esto podría deberse a que para mantener una patente se debe pagar una tasa, y posiblemente el titular decide dejar de hacerlo si la patente no le genera suficiente beneficio comercial.

    Aproximadamente 6,1 millones de patentes estaban vigentes en 2006, que incluyen 1,8 millones en vigor en Estados Unidos (aunque la mayoría de las patentes vigentes son propiedad de solicitantes de Japón).

    Modelos de utilidad para el desarrollo

    Un nuevo enfoque para aumentar la participación en el sistema de propiedad intelectual entre los países menos adelantados es promover la adopción de modelos de utilidad. Éstos son una manera especial de reconocer los derechos de propiedad sobre un pequeño progreso de una tecnología existente durante un plazo más corto que las patentes, y son más fáciles de obtener. Los modelos de utilidad tienden a mostrar un movimiento inverso al aumento de las patentes en un país, señaló Gurry. A modo de ejemplo, citó la modificación de un arado, el cual es una tecnología existente.

    La OMPI está estudiando los modelos de utilidad como una forma de abordar el problema de la concentración de patentes, a fin de estimular una mayor participación en el sistema de propiedad intelectual. Los países en desarrollo podrían emplear los modelos de utilidad para ingresar en el sistema, afirmó Gurry.

    En términos generales, se presentan más solicitudes de patente internacionales a través del PCT de la OMPI, que permite que una solicitud presentada en un Estado miembro se aplique en otros. Las solicitudes de patente presentadas por no residentes aumentaron del 35,7% al 43,6%, pero provienen principalmente de unas pocas naciones, sostuvo la OMPI.

    En cuanto a residentes que son titulares de patentes, Japón es el líder, con 1,6 millones, seguido por Estados Unidos, con 1,2 millones. Una tendencia clave es que se presentan más patentes en países que no son el país del titular ni de la empresa. Más del 90% de las solicitudes presentadas en las oficinas de patentes de Hong Kong, Israel, México y Singapur fueron de no residentes.

    Se observó correlación entre las solicitudes de patente y el gasto en investigación y desarrollo. Las solicitudes de patente presentadas por residentes por gasto en investigación y desarrollo fueron encabezadas por Corea, Rusia, Japón, China y Nueva Zelanda.

    Los sectores con más patentes en 2005 (el año más reciente) fueron la tecnología informática, las telecomunicaciones y las maquinarias eléctricas. La industria farmacéutica aumentó levemente, pero las patentes de biotecnología disminuyeron en un 2,7%.

    Otra vez trabajo atrasado y cuestiones relativas a la calidad

    La calidad de las patentes es una preocupación creciente para las partes interesadas. Gurry observó que la OMPI carece de medidas para evaluar la calidad de las patentes, lo cual dificulta la generación de las estadísticas correspondientes. Explicó que un criterio para medir la calidad de una patente podría ser la cantidad de veces que se la invalidó en tribunales de justicia. Otro criterio podría ser la calidad del proceso utilizado. Y un tercer criterio podría ser el “nivel de resonancia generado en todo el mundo” después de concedida, especialmente si se considera que la patente en cuestión cubre un aspecto demasiado básico.

    Por otro lado, el volumen de trabajo atrasado es un problema grave. El trabajo atrasado en materia de solicitudes de patente solamente en Estados Unidos era de más de un millón en 2006, y desde entonces ha aumentado, precisó Gurry. Se necesitarían 2 años y medio para procesar esa cantidad de solicitudes, incluso si no se presentara ninguna otra solicitud, agregó.

    “Un problema muy importante corresponde al exceso de la demanda y a la capacidad de las oficinas de patentes para procesar dicha demanda”, dijo Gurry. “Es un tema que la comunidad internacional de patentes debe atender”.

    En el ámbito internacional, se está debatiendo cómo podría repartirse el trabajo de manera más eficiente, a fin de que cada oficina no necesite repetir la labor ya realizada por otra. “Creo que deberíamos observar algún cambio en esta área en uno o dos años”, estimó.

    El Tratado de Cooperación en materia de Patentes se creó, en parte, para abordar este problema, pero los países ven la necesidad de repetir las solicitudes, observó. Además, la OMPI está ocupándose de las diferencias lingüísticas, que surgen debido a la creciente variedad de los solicitantes principales de patentes. La traducción de una solicitud y de los documentos al idioma local puede ser muy difícil y costosa para las empresas pequeñas.

    Algunas opciones que se están estudiando para solucionar esta cuestión incluyen la posibilidad de adaptar el PCT, armonizar las leyes y las prácticas en diferentes países (lo cual ha sido bloqueado en las negociaciones) y acelerar el examen de las patentes mediante la iniciativa piloto Patent Prosecution Highway (lo cual se logra bilateralmente y permite que una solicitud se procese en un país y se acelere en el otro). “Creo que ya es hora de que veamos una solución”, expresó Gurry.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.87.44.72