SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

The Politicization Of The US Patent System

The Washington Post story, How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss (July 30), is a vivid account of how patent reform has divided the US economy, preempting a possible replacement for David Kappos who stepped down 18 months ago. The division is even bigger than portrayed. Universities have lined up en masse to oppose reform, while main street businesses that merely use technology argue for reform. Reminiscent of the partisan divide that has paralyzed US politics, this struggle crosses party lines and extends well beyond the usual inter-industry debates. Framed in terms of combating patent trolls through technical legal fixes, there lurks a broader economic concern – to what extent ordinary retailers, bank, restaurants, local banks, motels, realtors, and travel agents should bear the burden of defending against patents as a cost of doing business.


Latest Comments
  • “We want everybody to agree on the science telling... »
  • So this is how we mankind will become extinct? No ... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    Aumentan las actividades de PI de la UNCTAD gracias al mandato renovado; mayor colaboración

    Published on 4 August 2008 @ 10:37 am

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Por Catherine Saez
    Las cuestiones relacionadas con la propiedad intelectual (PI) parecen ser un claro enfoque de políticas de la Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre Comercio y Desarrollo (UNCTAD), ya que la 12.va conferencia cuatrienal de la UNCTAD celebrada en abril reconfirmó el mandato sobre PI; la organización fue nombrada por otros dos organismos importantes de Naciones Unidas como una parte interesada clave en esta área que aporta una perspectiva única.

    “Brindamos una perspectiva de desarrollo a la cuestión de la PI”, afirmó Kiyoshi Adachi, asesor jurídico de la UNCTAD. La mayor participación se debe, en parte, al interés de los Estados miembros, y el equipo de PI pretende cumplir su mandato respaldándose en los conocimientos técnicos de su personal sobre asuntos jurídicos y desarrollo, señaló.

    El mandato sobre PI se indicó en el párrafo 153 del Acuerdo de Accra (pdf), el texto resultante de la conferencia de la UNCTAD que se lleva a cabo cada cuatro años, la más reciente se celebró en abril, en Ghana. El párrafo versa: “Teniendo en cuenta el Programa de la OMPI para el Desarrollo y sin perjuicio de la labor que se realice en otros foros, la UNCTAD, dentro de su mandato, debería seguir realizando investigaciones y análisis sobre los aspectos comerciales y de desarrollo de la propiedad intelectual, en particular en las esferas de la inversión y la tecnología”.

    La organización también fue nombrada en el Programa para el Desarrollo de la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual (OMPI) adoptado por la Asamblea General de 2007 de la OMPI. La UNCTAD se menciona en primer lugar entre los organismos con los que se solicita mayor cooperación en el párrafo 40 de las recomendaciones adoptadas, las cuales se encuentran en proceso de aplicación a través del Comité sobre Desarrollo y Propiedad Intelectual.

    Asimismo, la UNCTAD forma parte del plan de acción (pdf) adoptado por la última Asamblea Mundial de la Salud. El hecho de que se mencione en la resolución WHA 61.21, con el fin de participar en la creación y el fortalecimiento de la capacidad para administrar y aplicar la propiedad intelectual de acuerdo con las necesidades de los países en desarrollo, también parece confirmar la función de asesoría de la UNCTAD en asuntos relacionados con la propiedad intelectual.

    La UNCTAD, establecida en 1964, posee tres funciones fundamentales: proporcionar un foro para las deliberaciones intergubernamentales; realizar investigaciones, el análisis de las políticas y la recopilación de datos para los debates de los gobiernos; y proveer asistencia técnica a los países en desarrollo, con el propósito de fomentar su integración en la economía mundial. La organización confirma su interés y función constantes en la política de propiedad intelectual.

    Según dejaron trascender algunos funcionarios, el mayor interés por las capacidades de la UNCTAD parece haberse fortalecido por el hecho de que sus equipos se presentan en talleres y actividades relacionadas con la PI, donde ofrecen sus conocimientos técnicos en materia de desarrollo y PI.

    Proyecto conjunto con el ICTSD

    Actualmente la UNCTAD también lleva a cabo un proyecto junto con el Centro Internacional para el Comercio y el Desarrollo Sostenible (ICTSD), el proyecto de creación de capacidad en relación con los derechos de propiedad intelectual y el desarrollo sostenible, cuyo origen se remonta a 2001.

    Con el apoyo de fondos externos, el proyecto conjunto funciona “de diversas maneras como una empresa mixta” entre una organización no gubernamental y una organización intergubernamental, sostuvo Adachi. El proyecto generó diversos escritos y documentos de trabajo sobre políticas, un manual de referencia (en inglés) acerca del Acuerdo sobre los Aspectos de los Derechos de la Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio (ADPIC) de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) y el desarrollo, y estudios de casos. Además, estas organizaciones organizan eventos conjuntos, tales como el debate de expertos llevado a cabo en junio acerca de una aplicación más eficaz del artículo 66.2 del Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC que se centra en el fomento de la transferencia de tecnología.

    En el marco del proyecto conjunto con el ICTSD, la UNCTAD también elabora informes titulados la Dimensión de desarrollo de la PI. Constituyen informes de asesoría preparados para los gobiernos que los solicitan. La UNCTAD analiza sus sistemas de PI, aclara los objetivos y propone cambios en dichos sistemas a fin de alcanzar las metas de desarrollo de los gobiernos.

    Asimismo, la UNCTAD acude a otras partes interesadas para obtener información y organiza debates en colaboración con el grupo de expertos de Stockholm Network, una organización paneuropea que se orienta al mercado. En 2007, se organizaron dos debates, uno de los cuales abordó los derechos de PI y los productos farmacéuticos. Los grupos de expertos fueron bastante equilibrados, ya que congregaron a una amplia gama de puntos de vista, señaló Adachi.

    Asesoría a gobiernos sobre la adaptación de sus sistemas de PI

    La UNCTAD brinda asesoría a los gobiernos de países en desarrollo, en particular sobre patentes y productos farmacéuticos. “Muchos gobiernos muestran interés por esta área”, Adachi dijo a Intellectual Property Watch. Se hace especial hincapié en el uso de las flexibilidades previstas en el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC, en las instancias en las que los gobiernos tienen un margen de flexibilidad en la aplicación de las normas estipuladas por dicho acuerdo.

    Se han organizado varios talleres sobre este tema en África y Asia Sudoriental, que se llevarán a cabo este año y cuyo objetivo es la producción local de productos farmacéuticos. “Representa un ángulo levemente diferente del simple acceso a los medicamentos”, destacó Christoph Spennemann, experto jurídico de la UNCTAD.

    “África se está adentrando cada vez más en el tema” y se están realizando numerosas enmiendas a las leyes que contienen normas excesivamente rigurosas sobre PI a fin de incorporar las flexibilidades, sostuvo.

    Los gobiernos están creando plantas para la fabricación de medicamentos sobre la base de una exención en favor de los países menos adelantados (PMA) mediante la decisión de junio de 2002 del Consejo de los Aspectos de los Derechos de Propiedad Intelectual relacionados con el Comercio de la OMC, según la cual se exime a los PMA de conceder protección por patente a los productos farmacéuticos hasta 2016 o, en el caso de los países en desarrollo, usar las flexibilidades previstas para los genéricos, señaló.

    “Si se aplicaran estratégicamente las flexibilidades previstas en el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC, los productores de genéricos tendrían incentivos para radicarse en los PMA”, dijo Spennemann. Por ejemplo, Cipla, una importante empresa india de medicamentos genéricos, está interesada por una asociación conjunta para medicamentos genéricos contra el VIH en Uganda, señaló y agregó, sin embargo, “la decisión de si una empresa se instala en un país trasciende la esfera de la PI”.

    “Los gobiernos nos solicitan que examinemos sus leyes de PI a fin de garantizar que sean favorables a un entorno en el que se permita el desarrollo de la producción de genéricos”, sostuvo Spennemann.

    La UNCTAD atiende diversas solicitudes gubernamentales de asistencia técnica, en particular, ayuda a los países en desarrollo a establecer sistemas nacionales de PI que faciliten un mayor acceso a medicamentos asequibles, y apoya la creación de capacidades de suministro y producción farmacéutica en los ámbitos local y regional.

    La Organización de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo Industrial (ONUDI), con sede en Austria, realiza evaluaciones económicas de los países para garantizar que la fabricación de un producto sea viable desde la perspectiva económica, mientras que la UNCTAD se centra en asuntos jurídicos, señaló el funcionario. El enfoque de la ONUDI apunta a la creación de capacidad comercial, según se desprende de su sitio web.

    Nuevo interés por el acceso a los conocimientos

    El acceso a los conocimientos constituye un interés relativamente nuevo de la organización. “Avanzamos lentamente en esta área”, afirmó Spennemann.

    Por ejemplo, en Uganda, es posible que una asociación de editoriales esté considerando aumentar el acceso de los estudiantes a los libros de texto. Si bien se oponen a que se fotocopien los contenidos de los libros, están dispuestos a intentar nuevas actividades, por ejemplo, poner ciertos textos a disposición de las universidades de manera gratuita, renunciando así a algunos derechos de PI. El gobierno posiblemente brinde un incentivo al ofrecer un contrato público de suministro por separado en caso de que la editorial acepte ayudar a la universidad.

    La UNCTAD le brinda al gobierno asesoría acerca del acceso a los conocimientos y su uso de las flexibilidades previstas en el Acuerdo sobre los ADPIC, en el marco del derecho de autor. “El punto de partida siempre es el objetivo de desarrollo”, afirmó.

    Dos de los principales intereses del equipo de PI de la UNCTAD son el enfoque en los productos farmacéuticos financiados por los gobiernos británico y alemán, y el proyecto con el ICTSD, que abarca diversas áreas, tales como asuntos de derecho de autor, medicamentos, transferencia de tecnología y variedades de plantas. El equipo también analiza las repercusiones de los acuerdos bilaterales y regionales de comercio e inversiones en las políticas de PI de los países en desarrollo. “Nuestro mandato es muy amplio”, señaló Adachi.

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.211.1.204