SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Subscribing entitles a reader to complete stories on all topics released as they happen, special features, confidential documents and access to the complete, searchable story archive online back to 2004.
IP-Watch Summer Interns

IP-Watch interns talk about their Geneva experience in summer 2013. 2:42.

Inside Views

Submit ideas to info [at] ip-watch [dot] ch!

We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

Latest Comments
  • So simply put, we have the NABP saying that all ph... »
  • The original Brustle decision was widely criticise... »

  • For IPW Subscribers

    A directory of IP delegates in Geneva. Read more>

    A guide to Geneva-based public health and intellectual property organisations. Read More >


    Monthly Reporter

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter, published from 2004 to January 2011, is a 16-page monthly selection of the most important, updated stories and features, plus the People and News Briefs columns.

    The Intellectual Property Watch Monthly Reporter is available in an online archive on the IP-Watch website, available for IP-Watch Subscribers.

    Access the Monthly Reporter Archive >

    La nouvelle organisation du droit d’auteur Sud/Est Afrique vise la protection et l’innovation locale

    Published on 19 July 2008 @ 11:11 am

    Intellectual Property Watch

    Par Wagdy Sawahel pour Intellectual Property Watch
    Dans une invitation à renforcer la collaboration régionale dans les domaines de l’industrie de la création, du droit d’auteur et des droits connexes, dix-sept ministres africains de l’art et de la culture, ont officiellement lancé le Southern and Eastern Africa Copyright Network (Seaconet), organisation du droit d’auteur des régions du Sud et de l’Est de l’Afrique, récemment créée.

    « Le besoin de créer Seaconet a émergé en raison de l’absence d’un forum régional où pourraient être débattues les questions relatives à la promotion et la protection de l’industrie de la création, du droit d’auteur et des droits connexes », a rapporté Serman Chavula, directeur éxécutif de COSOMA, société du droit d’auteur du Malawi.

    Cette annonce a été faite le 30 mai dernier, au cours d’une réunion ministérielle organisée à Lilongwe, au Malawi.

    Seaconet, dont les bureaux se trouvent au Malawi, se concentrera sur des questions prioritaires telles que l’adoption d’une constitution, la création d’un secrétariat, l’harmonisation des lois relatives au droit d’auteur et la lutte contre le piratage au travers de l’introduction de mécanismes anti-piratage adoptables dans toute la région. Une base de données sera également créée au niveau régional pour rendre disponibles des informations destinées aux activités culturelles et artistiques ainsi qu’aux campagnes de sensibilisation sur le rôle de l’industrie de la création, du droit d’auteur et des droits connexes dans le développement national et régional. Enfin, un programme de formation sera élaboré dans le but de développer les ressources humaines dans le domaine des droits de propriété intellectuelle.

    Le groupe inclut l’Afrique du Sud, l’Angola, le Botswana, le Kenya, le Lesotho, Madagascar, le Malawi, le Mozambique, la Namibie, l’Ouganda, la République de Maurice, les Seychelles, le Soudan, le Swaziland, la Tanzanie, la Zambie et le Zimbabwe. Considérée comme organisation régionale, il s’agira d’un lieu où seront débattues les questions entourant la promotion et la protection de l’industrie de la création, du droit d’auteur et des droits connexes.

    L’élection du secrétariat et du conseil éxécutif de Seaconet a eu lieu au cours de la réunion. Yustus Mkinga de COSOTA (Copyright Society of Tanzania) a été élu président, Serman Chavula de COSOMA a été chargé du secrétariat. Le conseil éxécutif se compose de Peter Wasamba de KOPIKEN (Reproduction Rights Society of Kenya), de John Max de NASCAM (Namibia Society of Composers and Authors of Music), de Joel Baloyi de SAMRO (Southern African Music Rights Organisation) et de Kenneth Musamva, originaire de la Zambie, qui s’est vu confier les registres de droit d’auteur.

    La création de Seaconet a été proposée pour la première fois lors d’un atelier sous-régional de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’éducation, la science et la culture (UNESCO) sur le droit d’auteur et les droits connexes, ainsi que sur l’établissement d’un mécanisme pour la coopération régionale dans le domaine de l’industrie de la création, du droit d’auteur et des droits connexes, organisé du 25 au 28 avril 2005.

    Des organisations similaires existent déjà en Amérique latine, en Afrique Centrale, en Afrique de l’Ouest et en Asie, aux Caraïbes et aux États-Unis, dans les pays nordiques et dans les pays européens.

    Eltayeb Mohamed Abdelgadir, chercheur au sein de l’Agricultural Research Corporation au Soudan a expliqué à Intellectual Property Watch qu’un tel mouvement pouvait entraîner des modifications législatives.

    Selon lui, en tant que membres de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC), les pays de l’Afrique du Sud et de l’Est vont sans doute modifier leur législation afin d’introduire des standards plus élevés en matière de protection de la propriété intellectuelle. Il a cependant fait savoir que ces mêmes pays ont été desavantagés depuis le début par l’Accord de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce sur les aspects des droits de propriété intellectuelle qui touchent au commerce (Accord sur les ADPIC). En effet, les négociations menées de manière opaque ont entraîné un manque d’informations relatives à l’Accord sur les ADPIC, qui étaient nécessaires à l’interprétation des normes proposées. Seaconet jouera ainsi un rôle vital dans l’élaboration de programmes de formation ayant pour objectif la connaissance du contexte de l’Accord sur les ADPIC, ses fondements et ses objectifs.

    Monsieur Abdelgadir à indiqué que Seaconet devrait également promouvoir l’action coordonnée à l’intérieur des pays du Sud et de l’Est de l’Afrique afin d’éviter des efforts inutiles. Une synergie avec d’autres organisations et agences intergouvernementales similaires devrait aussi être mise en place afin de tirer profit de leur expérience.

    Les habitants du Sud et de l’Est africain ont un patrimoine riche d’un mélange de cultures, d’arts, de folklores, de langues et de diversité biologique qui s’exprime au travers du savoir traditionnel et des systèmes l’entourant, ainsi que des innovations mises au point par les autochtones. Il existe néanmoins un manque de reconnaissance et de protection juridique de ce savoir.

    Toujours selon monsieur Abdelgadir, Seaconet devrait jouer un rôle majeur à l’échelle de l’Afrique grâce à l’établissement d’un mécanisme et d’un modèle de législation visant à reconnaître et à protéger les savoirs et l’innovation. Ces outils, dérivés des systèmes encadrant le savoir traditionnel et des droits des communautés locales, devraient respecter les modes de vies et les structures sociales uniques présentes dans le Sud et l’Est africain.

    Une industrie maladroite ?

    Les pays de ces régions doivent faire face à un double défi : combattre le piratage des droits d’auteur des autres, comme on le leur demande, et protéger les droits d’auteur issus de leur territoire. « On ne peut pas demander la protection de notre savoir traditionnel et utiliser des logiciels de manière illégale », a expliqué monsieur Abdelgadir.

    Selon l’industrie étrangère, les pirates africains pénètrent rapidement le marché des pays membres de Seaconet. En effet, le Botswana, la Zambie et le Zimbabwe ont été ajoutés en 2007 sur la liste des 23 pays où le piratage est le plus actif, comme l’explique un rapport publié par Business Software Alliance (BSA), groupe parapluie de l’industrie des pays développés.

    Monsieur Abdelgadir s’appuie sur les chiffres de BSA pour constater que le piratage est aujourd’hui endémique dans de nombreux pays africains, ce qui représente une menace pour les industries du droit d’auteur. Les études de BSA ont ainsi indiqué qu’une réduction de dix pour cent du piratage d’ici 2009 pourrait permettre une croissance des technologies de l’information et engendrer quelques 22,5 milliards de dollars de recettes fiscales au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique. Il n’a toutefois pas mentionné le fait que les chiffres de BSA ont été remis en question ces dernières années.

    Selon lui, pour répondre aux inquiétudes de l’industrie, Seaconet doit se munir de moyens innovants de sensibilisation du public aux effets néfastes du piratage et de la contrefaçon. Des stratégies devront également être proposées afin de donner d’avantage de pouvoir aux investisseurs industriels et de renforcer et faire appliquer les lois en matière de propriété intellectuelle, l’objectif étant de promouvoir l’utilisation par l’Afrique des technologies de l’information comme outil du développement durable.

    Monsieur Abdelgadir a conclu en déclarant que « Seaconet est une bonne chose pour les pays d’Afrique du Sud et de l’Est, mais ce doit être une organisation solide, active et efficace, et non pas un atelier de discussion simplement là pour la décoration ».

     


    Leave a Reply

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website. By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    We welcome your participation in article and blog comment threads, and other discussion forums, where we encourage you to analyse and react to the content available on the Intellectual Property Watch website.

    By participating in discussions or reader forums, or by submitting opinion pieces or comments to articles, blogs, reviews or multimedia features, you are consenting to these rules.

    1. You agree that you are fully responsible for the content that you post. You will not knowingly post content that violates the copyright, trademark, patent or other intellectual property right of any third party or which you know is under a confidentiality obligation preventing its publication and that you will request removal of the same should you discover that you have violated this provision. Likewise, you may not post content that is libelous, defamatory, obscene, abusive, that violates a third party's right to privacy, that otherwise violates any applicable local, state, national or international law, that amounts to spamming or that is otherwise inappropriate. You may not post content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual preference, disability or other classification. Epithets and other language intended to intimidate or to incite violence are also prohibited. Furthermore, you may not impersonate others.

    2. You understand and agree that Intellectual Property Watch is not responsible for any content posted by you or third parties. You further understand that IP Watch does not monitor the content posted. Nevertheless, IP Watch may monitor the any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove, edit or otherwise alter content that it deems inappropriate for any reason whatever without consent nor notice. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on our site. IP Watch is not in any manner endorsing the content of the discussion forums and cannot and will not vouch for its reliability or otherwise accept liability for it.

    3. By submitting any contribution to IP Watch, you warrant that your contribution is your own original work and that you have the right to make it available to IP Watch for all purposes and you agree to indemnify IP Watch, its directors, employees and agents against all damages, legal fees and others expenses that may be incurred by IP Watch as a result of your breach of warranty or of these terms.

    4. You further agree not to publish any personal information about yourself or anyone else (for example telephone number or home address). If you add a comment to a blog, be aware that your email address will be apparent.

    5. IP Watch will not be liable for any loss including but not limited to the following (whether such losses are foreseen, known or otherwise): loss of data, loss of revenue or anticipated profit, loss of business, loss of opportunity, loss of goodwill or injury to reputation, losses suffered by third parties, any indirect, consequential or exemplary damages.

    6. You understand and agree that the discussion forums are to be used only for non-commercial purposes. You may not solicit funds, promote commercial entities or otherwise engage in commercial activity in our discussion forums.

    7. You acknowledge and agree that you use and/or rely on any information obtained through the discussion forums at your own risk.

    8. For any content that you post, you hereby grant to IP Watch the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual, exclusive and fully sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part, world-wide and to incorporate it in other works, in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

    9. These terms and your posts and contributions shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of Switzerland (without giving effect to conflict of laws principles thereof) and any dispute exclusively settled by the Courts of the Canton of Geneva.

     

     
    Your IP address is 54.81.236.36